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Monday, 23 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • APT 1.6 alpha 1 – seccomp and more

    I just uploaded APT 1.6 alpha 1, introducing a very scary thing: Seccomp sandboxing for methods, the programs downloading files from the internet and decompressing or compressing stuff. With seccomp I reduced the number of system calls these methods can use to 149 from 430. Specifically we excluded most ways of IPC, xattrs, and most importantly, the ability for methods to clone(2), fork(2), or execve(2) (or execveat(2)). Yes, that’s right – methods can no longer execute programs.

  • Debian Policy call for participation -- October 2017

    Here’s are some of the bugs against the Debian Policy Manual. In particular, there really are quite a few patches needing seconds from DDs.

  • Free Software Efforts (2017W42)

    Here’s my weekly report for week 42 of 2017. In this week I have replaced my spacebar, failed to replace a HDD and begun the process to replace my YubiKey.

  • Winners of the Ubuntu 17.10 Free Culture Showcase

    Every new Ubuntu cycle brings many changes, and the arrival of Ubuntu 17.10, the “Artful Aardvark” release, brings more changes than usual. The default desktop has changed to GNOME Shell, with some very thoughtful changes by the desktop team to make it more familiar. And of course, the community wallpapers included with this exciting new release have changed as well!

    Every cycle, talented artists around the world create media and release it under licenses that encourage sharing and adaptation. For Ubuntu 17.10, 50 images were submitted to the Ubuntu 17.10 Free Culture Showcase photo pool on Flickr, where all eligible submissions can be found.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Users Discuss DRM 1 on 1 – Unleaded Hangout

    Linux Users Discuss DRM. Today my Brandon and I discuss encrypted media extensions, digital rights management and our freedom on the Linux desktop. So join Brandon and I as we as Linux Users Discuss DRM.

  • i965 Shader Cache Revised As It Still Might Squeeze Into Mesa 17.3

    Intel's Jordan Justen has sent out his third revision to the recently renewed patches for allowing an OpenGL on-disk shader cache for the "i965" Mesa driver.

    Just a few days back Jordan sent out a revised Intel shader cache implementation for this code that's long been baking on the Intel side but yet to be merged for mainline Mesa while the RadeonSI shader cache and co has been present now for many months.

  • Sunday Linux Gaming Wrap-up
  • retro-gtk: The Future, Marty!

    Let's come back to retro-gtk. In the previous articles I explained how bad retro-gtk was, what I did to start improving it and more importantly what I did to prepare the terrain for further development. This article will detail the aforementioned planed improvements!

  • Ikea’s Open-Source Showrooms

    Ikea Group will also roll out a new digital platform called 'Co-Create Ikea' which mimics its IT division's open-source software development, where customers have the chance help develop and test new products.

  • Glibc Picks Up Some More FMA Performance Optimizations

    The GNU C Library, glibc, has picked up support for some additional functions as FMA-optimized versions.

    The newest functions now getting the fused multiply-add (FMA) support are powf(), logf(), exp2f(), and log2f(). The FMA instruction set is present since Intel Haswell and AMD Piledriver generations and like past FMA optimizations, the benefits can be quite noticeable.

  • Landmark release of Termination of Transfer tool from Creative Commons and Authors Alliance

    For more than a decade, Creative Commons has developed and stewarded legal tools that give creators the opportunity to share their work on open terms. We have focused on tools that empower sharing at the moment of publication, leaving out an important group of creators: what about those who previously signed away their rights to their works long ago, but who now want to share on open terms under a CC license or renegotiate unfavorable publishing terms?

  • The recent catastrophic Wi-Fi vulnerability was in plain sight for 13 years behind a corporate paywall

    The recent Wi-Fi “KRACK” vulnerability, which allowed anyone to get onto a secure network (and which was quickly patched by reputable vendors), had been in plain sight behind a corporate-level paywall for 13 years. This raises a number of relevant, interesting, and uncomfortable questions.

Events: openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017, GStreamer Conference 2017, FSFE Assembly During 34C3

Filed under
OSS
  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017 in Tokyo
  • GStreamer Conference 2017 Videos

    Taking place this weekend in Prague has been the 8th annual GStreamer Conference, which is preceding next week's Linux Foundation Embedded Linux Conference Europe.

  • Call for sessions at the FSFE assembly during 34C3

    With the CCC moving from Hamburg to Leipzig, there are not only logistic changes to be done but also some organisational changes. We are still figuring out the details, but in the context of this call, one of the major changes will be the loss of free available rooms to book for self-organised sessions. Instead, assemblies that match with each other are asked to cluster around 1 of several stages and use that as a common stage for self-organized sessions together. To make the most of this situation, the FSFE will for the first time not join the Noisy Square this year but form a new neighbourhood with other freedom fighting NGOs – in particular with our friends from European Digital Rights. However, at this point of time, we do not yet have more information about the concrete or final arrangements.

GNOME 3.28 Linux Desktop Environment Development Kicks Off with First Snapshot

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME developer Javier Jardón is kicking off the development of the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment with the first snapshot, GNOME 3.27.1, which is now available for public testing.

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How to manage casual contributors to open source projects

Filed under
OSS

Increasingly, people want to contribute to projects casually—when they want to, rather than adhering to a schedule. This is part of a broader trend of "episodic volunteering" noted by a wide range of volunteer organizations and governments. This has been attributed not only to changes in the workforce, which leave fewer people able to volunteer with less spare time to share, but also to changes in how people perceive the act of volunteering. It is no longer seen as a communal obligation, rather as a conditional activity in which the volunteer also receives benefits. Moreover, distributed revision-control systems and the network effects of GitHub, which standardize the process of making a contribution, make it easier for people to contribute casually to free/libre/open source software (FLOSS) projects.

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5 ways to invigorate education with Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

A couple of years ago, I was talking to PayPal senior director of software development Harper Reed at All Things Open in Raleigh, N.C., when he suggested that the best way to invigorate education would be to purchase Raspberry Pis en masse and put them in public libraries.

Although many schools have made sizeable investments in classroom technology, those investments have done little to advance students' understanding of how the technology works. That's where the Raspberry Pi comes in, as it's the ideal vehicle to demonstrate the educational efficacy of open source software and open hardware in the classroom.

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System76 Unveils First Release of Pop!_OS Linux Distro, Based on Ubuntu 17.10

Filed under
OS
Linux
Ubuntu

System76, the maker of Linux-based computers, is proud to announce the first-ever release of Pop!_OS Linux, its own GNU/Linux distribution based on Canonical's Ubuntu OS.

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Lubuntu Next 17.10 Rolls Out to Early Adopters with LXQt 0.11.1 Desktop

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Ubuntu

Lubuntu team announced the release and immediate availability for download of Lubuntu 17.10 and Lubuntu Next 17.10 distributions as part of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system.

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Also: Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 Releases for Chinese Linux Users with Own Video Player, More

Software and howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos

DockerCon EU, Containers and Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Surprise Announcement Changes Container Landscape at DockerCon EU
  • Containers And Chromebooks: The Future Of Chrome OS

    Last month, I penned my thoughts on what the future of Chrome OS could look like and how devices like the Pixelbook could play a big part in the implementation of containers on Chromebooks. Running non-native apps on top of the Chrome operating system without the need for hacky workarounds would be a monumental watershed for Google who has now tossed a hat in the ring to capture their share of the consumer PC market.

    Virtual Machines, like VMWare, aren’t new and as a third-party solution work very well. However, the development we have been tracking goes well beyond a traditional, web-based solution. The work being done here seems to remove the third-parties and eliminate a browser by creating a built-in container system that can run, in theory, any app the hardware will support.

Party Like It's 1987 - PC-MOS/386 Goes Open Source

Filed under
OS
OSS

The idea of a multi-user operating system is almost a tautology today but back in the 1980s it wasn't all that common - at least when it came to personal computing. PC-MOS was a multi-user operating system that, like DR-DOS and others, competed with Microsoft's MS-DOS before eventually disappearing at the Redmond juggernaut crushed almost all its competition. Now, Roeland Jansen, Gary Robertson and Rod Roark have put the operating system onto GitHub as an open source project so we can all mess with its source code.

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Android, Android on Desktops (Android-x86), Samsung Galaxy on Desktop/DeX

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
  • Pixel 2 Has Screen Burn-In Problem, Google Says They’re “Actively Investigating” The Report

    Android Central has reported that their Pixel 2 XL review unit is having screen burn-in issues. That’s a bad thing for the latest made-by-Google flagship which was announced earlier on October 4, ditching the headphone jack.

  • Android-x86 7.1-rc2 Now Supports NVMe SSDs, Better QEMU VirGL

    The Android-x86 project derived from Google's Android Open-Source Project code-base remains officially at Android 6.0, but there is an Android 7.1 "Nougat" build available for testing.

    Quietly released earlier this month was a second release candidate based on Android 7.1. The Android-x86 7.1-RC2 release is based on upstream AOSP 7.1-RC2 / Nougat-MR2 along with some extra improvements for this x86-targeted build.

  • What To Do When The Power Button Of Your Android Phone Is Broken?
  • Samsung is adding Linux support for DeX with the new ‘Linux on Galaxy’ app

    Since Samsung debuted the DeX feature earlier this year with the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ smartphones, the company has been making small changes to improve the whole experience of using your smartphone as a PC. In order to further enhance Samsung DeX, the company has announced “Linux on Galaxy”, an app that will let developers run Linux-based distributions on their mobile device, allowing them to code on-the-go. The app is DeX-enabled, which means developers can code on a bigger device, powered by their Galaxy S8, Galaxy S8+ or Galaxy Note8.

  • You can run any Linux distro on Samsung smartphones using Linux with Galaxy App

    The convergence of a smartphone with a PC/laptop is not new and has been in making for several years. In fact, the idea of such a convergence started with Nokia’s Communicator phone launched in 1996 when it was the undisputed king of feature phone and mobile phone arena.

    Ubuntu devs tried a similar theme with the now-dead Ubuntu for smartphones and tablets. The Ubuntu os was launched with the idea to run full Linux apps on your smartphone. The smartphone even gave users an option to connect a keyboard, mouse, and display. However, that did not sell.

Linux Foundation Announcements: CIP, OpenMessaging, CDLA

Filed under
Linux
  • Civil Infrastructure Platform Announces the Release of CIP Core

    Hosted by The Linux Foundation, CIP addresses the needs of long-term software for the power generation and distribution, water, oil and gas, transportation and building automation industries. CIP members such as Codethink, Hitachi, Plat'Home, Renesas, Siemens and Toshiba are working to create a reliable and secure Linux-based embedded software platform that can be sustained more than 10 years and up to 60 years.

  • Linux Foundation Launches OpenMessaging Project

    ​Through a shared exertion bnb m from endeavors and groups put resources into the cloud, enormous information, and standard APIs, I'm eager to welcome the OpenMessaging project from The Linux Foundation. The OpenMessaging group will likely make a comprehensively embraced, merchant impartial, and open standard for dispersed informing that can be conveyed in the cloud, on-commence, and half and half utilize cases.

  • Linux Foundation Debuts Community Data License Agreement

    he Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced the Community Data License Agreement (CDLA) family of open data agreements. In an era of expansive and often underused data, the CDLA licenses are an effort to define a licensing framework to support collaborative communities built around curating and sharing "open" data.

  • The Linux Foundation Releases Three New Open Source Guides for the Enterprise

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, has released the next three in a series of Open Source Guides for the Enterprise, created to help executives, open source program managers, developers, attorneys and other decision makers learn how to best leverage open source. These three new guides add to the six released last month at Open Source Summit North America.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux OS Patched Against WPA2 KRACK Bug, GCC 6 Now Removed

Filed under
SUSE

If you're using the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system, you should know that one of the latest snapshots removed the GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 6 packages from the default install and patched it against the WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability.

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Librem 5 Linux Phone to Include Nextcloud's End-to-End Encrypted File Storage

Filed under
Linux

Purism and Nextcloud announced partnership to bring Nextcloud's end-to-end encrypted file sync and sharing services to Purism's mobile and desktop computing products

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Also: Librem 5 Privacy-Focused Linux Phone Crowdfunding Campaign Ends with $2 Million

Nextcloud to be available on 'free' smartphone

Red Hat: Public Sector, InFluxData, New Chairman of the Board

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Open source innovation in the public sector

    With digitalization, open source technology is gaining momentum and governments are increasingly embracing open source solutions. In open government initiatives, open source has led to greater citizen participation and contribution. eGov Innovation speaks to Damien Wong, Vice President & General Manager ASEAN, Red Hat, on how government agencies can tap on open source to foster innovation, accelerate digital transformation and benefit citizens.

  • InFluxData Teams With IBM And RedHat To Simplify Analyzing The IOT Data Deluge
  • Career Briefs: Red Hat Inc. Board of Directors Appoints Narendra K. Gupta as Chairman of the Board

    Red Hat Inc. announced that its board of directors has appointed Narendra K. Gupta as chairman of the board. Gupta, who has served on Red Hat’s board of directors since 2005, is a technology industry veteran with more than 40 years’ experience. In 2006, the Indian American entrepreneur co-founded Nexus Venture Partners, a leading venture capital fund, and he currently serves as the firm’s managing director. Gupta co-founded Integrated Systems Inc. in 1980 to develop products for embedded software development. He served as ISI’s president and CEO from its founding until 1994 and as chairman until 2000 when ISI merged with Wind River Systems Inc. He currently serves on the board of trustees of the California Institute of Technology, the advisory board of the Asia Society Northern California, and on the boards of several privately held companies.

ArchLabs Linux Mínimo

Filed under
Reviews

ArchLabs is a great combination of lightweight and, thanks to its Arch base, constantly up-to-date software. While probably not for everyone, ArchLabs is a polished distribution that anyone looking for an Arch-based distribution that has a pre-configured desktop and software selection should check out. The only drawback is that, like many lightweight distributions, selecting applications based on what is deemed best for an individual task can result in an odd hodgepodge of applications that all behave differently. Of course, the choice of what to install is up to the user, so that might not be a problem for some, but having applications from Xfce, GNOME, KDE, etc., can lead to a jumbled user experience.

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A look at Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

I’m going to preface this review, and say that I liked Ubuntu 17.10 after using it for a few days. However, there were multiple issues with it, that ultimately ruined my experience; however, your mileage my vary.

Ubuntu 17.10, code-named Artful Aardvark, is the latest Ubuntu Linux release from Canonical, and was released Oct. 19.

It’s the first desktop release of the pure Ubuntu flavor, to not feature the Unity desktop, since Ubuntu 11.04. Now, Ubuntu uses the GNOME desktop environment now.

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