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Monday, 23 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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ReactOS 0.4.9 released

Filed under
OS

The ReactOS Project is pleased to announce the release of version 0.4.9, the latest in our accelerated cadence targeting a release every three months.

While a consequence of this faster cycle might mean fewer headliner changes, much of the visible effort nowadays comes in the form of quality-of-life improvements in how ReactOS functions. At the same time work continues on the underlying systems which provide more subtle improvements such as greater system stability and general consistency.

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Also: ReactOS 0.4.9 Officially Released As The First Self-Hosting Version, Better Stability

ReactOS 0.4.9 Officially Released with Self-Hosting Capabilities, New Features

Slax 9.5.0 released

Filed under
Slack

I am happy to announce that a next version of Slax Linux has been released. Slax is a minimalistic, fully modular operating system. As usual, this version incorporates all upstream improvements from Debian stable, and fixes few small known bugs.

I am also happy to announce that it is now possible to purchase Slax preinstalled on an USB flash drive with hardware-based AES encryption. This device is universally usable because the encryption is performed directly by the drive itself, there is no software to install needed. Once disconnected, the USB drive automatically locks itself again. Payment is possible only with Bitcoin, because I truly wish to see PayPal and credit card companies to cease to exist soon.

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LibreOffice With Microsoft DRM and a Tax

Filed under
LibO
Microsoft
Legal

Windows vs Linux: Which One’s Better Operating System?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Ever since Linux has taken a huge leap in the computing field, questions have arisen as to which is the better option for our computers. Is it Windows or Linux? Though this is a never-ending debate and there are a ton of users on both sides of the scale here, we try to make it a little easier for you to differentiate between the two.

Here, we try to pull out a few of the features of both the Operating Systems to figure out the better of the two masterpieces:

Read more

Also: 5 Reasons You Should Switch From Windows To Linux Right Now

Cinnamon 4.0 Will Tackle Screen Tearing on Linux Mint

Filed under
GNOME

Linux Mint plans to make more performance improvements to the Cinnamon desktop ahead of its next release.

Similar work featured as part of Cinnamon 3.8, released as part of Linux Mint 19, and improved the responsiveness of launching apps on the desktop.

For the next major release of the Cinnamon desktop environment, the team want to tackle another performance-related bugbear: screen tearing.

“On modern NVIDIA GPUs we’re able to get rid of screen tearing by using “Force Composition Pipeline” in NVIDIA-Settings. With Vsync disabled in Cinnamon we then enjoy a faster desktop environments with no screen tearing,“, writes Cinnamon’s lead developer Clement Lefebvre in a recent blog post.

Read more

4 open source media conversion tools for the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Ah, so many file formats—especially audio and video ones—can make for fun times if you get a file with an extension you don't recognize, if your media player doesn't play a file in that format, or if you want to use an open format.

So, what can a Linux user do? Turn to one of the many open source media conversion tools for the Linux desktop, of course. Let's take a look at four of them.

Read more

Launching Open Source Initiatives Is the Next Battleground In Quantum Computing

Filed under
OSS

At a time when tech giants are ploughing millions of dollars in quantum computing and are striving ahead with breakthroughs, Google, Microsoft and IBM seem to be locked in an intense battle of quantum supremacy. Mountain View search giant announced Cirq — an open-source framework for NISQ computers. Cirq is an open-source initiative that allows developers to create algorithms that can run on a number of machines without having a full background in quantum physics.

The Google blog notes that once installed — Cirq enables researchers to write quantum algorithms for specific quantum processors. “Cirq gives users fine-tuned control over quantum circuits, specifying gate behaviour using native gates, placing these gates appropriately on the device, and scheduling the timing of these gates within the constraints of the quantum hardware,” the blog notes. Cirq supports running these algorithms locally on a simulator and is designed to easily integrate with future quantum hardware or larger simulators via the cloud.

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NetBSD Version 8.0 Released With New Features

Filed under
News

NetBSD has a new major release in its 25th year. NetBSD 8.0 release brings several new features and improvements.
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Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

Review: Peppermint OS 9

Filed under
Reviews

While I have to admit that I am not the target audience for a distribution focused on web-based applications, I found Peppermint 9 to be a solid distribution. Despite pulling components from multiple desktop environments, Peppermint 9's desktop is well integrated and easy to use. It was also easy to add both web-based and traditional applications to the system, so the distribution can be adjusted for users who prefer either.

Peppermint 9 is not for everyone, but users who do most their work in Google Docs or Microsoft Office Online should give Peppermint a try. However, users accustomed to using traditional desktop applications might want to stick to one of the many alternatives out there. Yes, Peppermint 9 can be easily adjusted to use traditional desktop applications, but many of the other distribution options out there come with those kinds of applications pre-installed.

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A Major GNOME Icon Redesign is Getting Underway

Filed under
GNOME

Your favourite GNOME applications will soon have dramatically different icons.

GNOME devs are redesigning the default icons for all GNOME core apps as part a wider overhaul of GNOME design guidelines.

The move hope to make it easier (and less effort) for app developers to provide high-quality and useful icons for their software on the GNOME desktop.

Not that this redesign is much a surprise, as the Adwaita folder icons we highlighted a few weeks back suggested a new tack was being taken on design.

With the GNOME desktop environment shipping on the Purism Librem 5 smartphone, the timing of this revamp couldn’t be better.

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Linux 4.17.9, 4.14.57, 4.9.114, 4.4.143, and 3.18.116

Filed under
Linux

AMD Ryzen 7 2700X: Windows 10 vs. Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Microsoft

Recently there have been several Linux distribution benchmark comparisons on Phoronix to test the latest Linux OS releases, including several comparing to the current Microsoft Windows 10 performance. Those recent tests have all be done with various Intel CPUs, but for those curious about the AMD Windows vs. Linux performance, here are some fresh benchmarks as we approach the end of July.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • NXP i.MX8 SoC Support Hasn't Yet Worked Its Way Into The Mainline Linux Kernel

    While early in the year was talk of introducing NXP i.MX8 SoC support in the Linux 4.17 kernel, that didn't happen. Support for that latest-generation i.MX SoC also didn't make it for Linux 4.18 and it also looks like it will not make it for Linux 4.19.

    There have been patches for the i.MX8 Linux SoC support since January thanks to Pengutronix with GPIO, clock, net, and the core patches being written by the German firm. But unfortunately they haven't yet made it to mainline. For the i.MX8 in the mainline kernel tree as of today with Linux 4.18 there is just the i.MX8QM AHCI SATA support, FEC network driver carried over from earlier Freescale SoCs, and some bits for the the Etnaviv DRM driver with the Vivante GC7000L graphics from the i.MX8M.

  • Microsoft Surface Dial & Dell Totem Support Heading To Linux 4.19

    Back in May we covered the big rewrite of the Linux kernel's HID multi-touch code and in the process supporting the Microsoft Surface Dial and Dell Canvas 27's Totem input device. That work will be landing in the Linux 4.19 kernel.

  • Distributed Services Fabric for Container-Based Applications Powered by Avi Network

    Avi Vantage constantly monitors several metrics that represent load on application instances. Operators can configure an autoscaling policy to automatically scale up or scale down application instances based on load. In addition, Avi Vantage also learns application access patterns and can perform intelligent, predictive autoscaling based on learnt access patterns.

    In our next blog post we will focus on the intelligence and security features that Avi Networks and OpenShift provide for container-based applications.

  • Fedora Needs Some Help If Continuing To Support The LXQt Desktop

    Fedora's LXQt desktop is at risk of being dropped if new packagers do not step up to maintain this lightweight Qt desktop environment's support.

    LXQt for Fedora right now is already outdated and in need of some adjustments for better integration into the Fedora ecosystem. But the core Fedora LXQt packager has since left and another Fedora packager who had stepped up to maintain the LXQt bits is needing to move on due to his university work.

  • GSoC Status Report for Fedora App: Abhishek Sharma
  • MIUI Hidden Settings For Xiaomi Fans | Remove Bloatware From Your Mi Device
  • GNU Parallel 20180722 ('Crimson Hexagon') released [alpha]

    GNU Parallel 20180722 ('Crimson Hexagon') [alpha] has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/

    This release has significant changes and is considered alpha quality.

  • PR: With Blockchain for the Open Source Hardware – ENVIENTA

    The Hungarian rooted ENVIENTA project started its preliminary token issue on 1st July (ICO private token sale).

    The aim of the project is to help to spread the open source philosophy becoming more and more common in hardware development industry and to support the life cycle of the products, made this way, from the idea to the realization. The idea of the open source hardware is not new, however, there has been no attempt to gather all the participants in this field on a common platform in order to support cooperations.

Wine and Games: Wine-Staging 3.13, Bomber Crew, Faeria

Filed under
Gaming
  • Wine-Staging 3.13 Released With Extra Patches

    Following Friday's release of Wine 3.13 is now the adjoining Wine-Staging 3.13 version debut that incorporates various extra/testing patches atop this code-base for running Windows programs/games primarily on Linux and macOS systems.

  • Bomber Crew, the action-filled bomber sim, has gotten quite a few new features recently

    Liam covered Bomber Crew when it first came out and found that bombing the enemy from high wasn’t as easy at he thought it’d be. I’ve since played a little of the game as well and have found it to be an engaging and often wild ride, where even with a competent crew and plenty of good equipment it can be a challenge to make it home. It can be a little overwhelming during it’s action-filled missions but once you get into the groove of the game it’s a rewarding experience.

  • Card-based strategy game Faeria gets massive “2.0” update, moves away from a F2P model

    The rather engaging card battling game has recently gotten a massive new update that changes up the game significantly. Most importantly, the title is no longer free-to-play with new players having to buy into the experience.

KDE and GNOME: KDE 18.08, Usability & Productivity and More

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • KDE Team Announces Major Improvements in Upcoming KDE 18.08 Release

    The developers of Linux’s KDE suite have announced a major slew of updates set to be included in the upcoming KDE 18.08, set for an August 2018 release. Details for these updates revolve around a range of new features and overall polish for the core KDE apps including Gwenview, Spectacle, Konsole, and Dolphin, as well as focusing on the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.14 update due in October.

    Due to KDE’s open-source nature, the devs also have a site up for people interested in getting involved, whether its simple bug reporting or actually being hands-on with the development using C++, Qt, and CMake. You can read more about their community program at KDE – Get Involved.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 28

    Here’s another big week for KDE’s Usability and Productivity initiative. We’re getting ready for the release of KDE Applications 18.08–the second of our three yearly Applications releases. As the numbers in the version suggest, it will be released in August of 2018, about a month from now. As such, there’s been a lot of focus on new features and polish for core KDE apps such as Dolphin, Gwenview, Konsole, and Spectacle. We’re also ramping up our work for KDE Plasma 5.14, which is scheduled for release in October.

  • I’ve built a box

    This is not the typical post I use to write (which is usually about what I do at work, often related to GNOME, so if you’re not interested, just skip it…). But a couple of months ago I did something different that I still want to write about. That thing was a wooden box (sorry if you were expecting a Gavin Box) that I was asked to carve by my brother for his wedding, to be used for carrying the wedding rings.

    The wedding had a Game of Thrones’s theme (there was not blood in it though, if you’re wondering), so naturally my brother wanted some of that in the box. Thus, my initial idea was to just buy a box and carve something to do with GoT and include their names. Something like this, as my brother sent me for inspiration.

  • Bastian Ilsø Hougaard: GUADEC18 Developer Center BoF Part 3: Challenges

    Currently, the Developer Center infrastructure and documentation suffers from low to non-existing maintenance. It’s a sign we need to take serious. Do we need lower the barrier to contributing to the developer documentation? What can we do to make the infrastructure easier to maintain? The underlying issue here likely also ties into why we now see new GNOME documentation hosted on other websites by different maintainers powered by different underlying technologies. I think this challenge needs both thinking from a technical point of view (how we might support editing multi-language documentation and auto-generated documentation) and an organizational point of view (assigning maintainership, reviewing our docs, aligning visions).

Programming: Persepolis, Microsoft EEE, Apache Subversion 1.10.2, SPAKE2 In Golang, AMD AOCC 1.2.1

Filed under
Development
  • Persepolis Download Manager: Impressive Python frontend for aria2

    Persepolis Download Manager is a handy open source download manager written in Python and PyQt. It’s a graphical frontend for aria2 aiming to make downloads both easier and faster.

    This software project commenced development in 2015 with the first release in July 2016. While it was initially only a simple graphical user interface, the software has seen some pretty hefty development since then with a whole raft of additional functionality added, improvements to the user interface, and cross-platform support.

  • Microsoft Visual Studio Code replumbed for better Python taming [Ed: Embrace and extend. Microsoft is trying to push developers of FOSS over to their proprietary IDE that puts spying inside compiled code.]
  • What’s new in Apache Subversion 1.10.2?

    I couldn’t believe if you are unaware of the Apache Subversion. It is an Enterprise-class centralized version control founded in 2000 by CollabNet Inc. One of the most successful opensource project in past many years. Mostly all the opensource projects and enterprise source code are on subversion. It has the rich community of developers and users who are continuously improving subversion.

  • SPAKE2 In Golang: Journey to Cryptoland begins

    Before I can go to detail I should tell why/how I came to implementing SPAKE2 in Golang. Story starts a couple of month back when I started contributing to *magic-wormhole.rs*, a Rust port of original Python project of magic-wormhole. You can read this LWN article to understand more about what magic-wormhole is.

    During contribution my friend Ramakrishnan Muthukrishnan said to me that I should try to port the magic-wormhole to Golang. I was not a expert Go programmer but had understanding of language basics and thought why not use it to improve my language understanding. And this is where it all started.

  • AMD AOCC 1.2.1 Compiler Flings Flang Fixes

    AMD released a minor update to their AMD Optimizing C/C++ Compiler.

    AOCC is the company's downstream of LLVM/Clang with optimizations for their Zen CPU microarchitecture with compiler optimizations/improvements before they work their way into upstream LLVM. AOCC is the replacement for AMD's Open64 compiler used years ago with earlier micro-architectures.

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More in Tux Machines

Windows vs Linux: Which One’s Better Operating System?

Ever since Linux has taken a huge leap in the computing field, questions have arisen as to which is the better option for our computers. Is it Windows or Linux? Though this is a never-ending debate and there are a ton of users on both sides of the scale here, we try to make it a little easier for you to differentiate between the two. Here, we try to pull out a few of the features of both the Operating Systems to figure out the better of the two masterpieces: Read more Also: 5 Reasons You Should Switch From Windows To Linux Right Now

Cinnamon 4.0 Will Tackle Screen Tearing on Linux Mint

Linux Mint plans to make more performance improvements to the Cinnamon desktop ahead of its next release. Similar work featured as part of Cinnamon 3.8, released as part of Linux Mint 19, and improved the responsiveness of launching apps on the desktop. For the next major release of the Cinnamon desktop environment, the team want to tackle another performance-related bugbear: screen tearing. “On modern NVIDIA GPUs we’re able to get rid of screen tearing by using “Force Composition Pipeline” in NVIDIA-Settings. With Vsync disabled in Cinnamon we then enjoy a faster desktop environments with no screen tearing,“, writes Cinnamon’s lead developer Clement Lefebvre in a recent blog post. Read more

4 open source media conversion tools for the Linux desktop

Ah, so many file formats—especially audio and video ones—can make for fun times if you get a file with an extension you don't recognize, if your media player doesn't play a file in that format, or if you want to use an open format. So, what can a Linux user do? Turn to one of the many open source media conversion tools for the Linux desktop, of course. Let's take a look at four of them. Read more

Android Leftovers