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Tuesday, 19 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 12:48pm
Story Linux, the Linux Foundation and Graphics Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 12:46pm
Story 11 Best Linux Gaming Distros You Need To Use In 2018 and Fortnite Coming to Android Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 12:44pm
Story Fedora and Red Hat Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 12:39pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 11:18am
Story Kubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver upgrades - Results! Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 11:16am
Blog entry Unixstickers Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 10:47am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 10:05am
Story DragonFlyBSD 5.2.2 Released To Fix The Lazy State Save/Restore Bug Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 9:55am
Story Canonical/Ubuntu: Canonical's Engineering Tech Lead, Field Product Manager, and Designers'/Developers' Updates Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 9:32am

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 6th Birthday of It’s FOSS: Win Linux Laptop, Stickers and more Gifts
  • Five Useful Features That Are On Their Way To The Chrome OS
  • HackUp is a Desktop Hacker News Client for Linux

    Avid readers of social news sharing site Hacker News might be interested in a new app recently added to Flathub.

    Called HackUp, it is a Hacker News desktop client written in Vala. It lets you browse and read Hacker News submissions without needing to open a web browser (which for a legendary procrastinator like me, is a good thing).

  • Why use Chef for automation and orchestration

    Chef has been a leading open source tool for automating the provisioning and configuration of servers for the better part of a decade. In recent years the company added InSpec and Habitat to the portfolio, open source projects that automate policy compliance testing and the deployment and configuration of applications, respectively. The company’s flagship commercial offering, Chef Automate, brings all of these pieces together.  

  • Xfdesktop 4.13.2 Released As Another Step Towards Xfce 4.14

    As another step towards the long-awaited Xfce 4.14 desktop environment release, Xfdesktop 4.13.2 is now available as the latest development release for this important piece of the Xfce desktop stack.

    Xfdesktop is the component that manages the desktop background, the pop-up list of applications, drawing icons on the desktop, etc. Xfdesktop 4.13.2 is the first development release since Xfdesktop 4.13.1 one year ago.

  • Monday Markdown

    I’ve spent the first portion of the coding period focused on improving the documentation browser for GNOME Javascript. In 2015/16 ptomato began porting GIR sources (the source of most GJS documentation) to [DevDocs.io], an open-source documentation browser, using g-ir-doc-tool in gobject-introspection. He did excellent work and produced a functioning product that now lives at [devdocs.baznga.org]. My goals were to take the current product and incorporate GNOME theming, fix issues with incorrect documentation, rebase the project on upstream, and reorient some of the project’s features to better serve an object oriented and GNOME model.

  • Refactor: Backend and UI

    Fractal is currently structured into two parts: The API part (fractal-matrix-api) and GTK part (fractal-gtk). The first one mostly just does the https calls to the Matrix server, the GTK part does everything else. This post will not talk about the API part since that will remain more or less the same (at least for now).

  • Open source board lets you analyze SPI connections on a USB-connected laptop

    Excamera Labs has launched an open source, $27 and up “SPIDriver” board on Crowd Supply for analyzing and testing SPI-connected displays, sensors, flash, and other components on a laptop or via a built-in color LCD display.

    Monitoring SPI devices such as LCD panels, LED arrays, sensors, and SPI flash may not be quite as gnarly as managing I2C gizmos, but either of these short-distance, serial data transfer protocols can be a hassle. While Arduino boards provide libraries for SPI monitoring, there’s still a lot of guesswork involved due to lack of real-time feedback about the SPI bus state.

  •  

  • Cooperative Learning

    I’ve got some under-utilised KVM servers that I could use to provide test VMs for network software, my original idea was to use those for members of my local LUG. But that doesn’t scale well. If a larger group people are to be involved they would have to run their own virtual machines, use physical hardware, or use trial accounts from VM companies.

    The general idea would be for two broad categories of sessions, ones where an expert provides a training session (assigning tasks to students and providing suggestions when they get stuck) and ones where the coordinator has no particular expertise and everyone just learns together (like “let’s all download a random BSD Unix and see how it compares to Linux”).

    [...]

    There is a Wikipedia page about Cooperative Learning. While that’s interesting I don’t think it has much relevance on what I’m trying to do. The Wikipedia article has some good information on the benefits of cooperative education and situations where it doesn’t work well. My idea is to have a self-selecting people who choose it because of their own personal goals in terms of fun and learning. So it doesn’t have to work for everyone, just for enough people to have a good group.

  • Chinese search giant Baidu creates an open-source A.I. for detecting cancer

    “We hope this open-sourced algorithm can serve as a high-quality baseline for future research in this area,” Li said. “The algorithm is only evaluated on a limited number of public datasets at this stage. However, the algorithm needs to be further assessed using much more clinically relevant data to prove it still maintains higher accuracy than experienced pathologists. Our team will continue improving the algorithm and collaborating with researchers with whom we can share new datasets.”

  • Fynd organizes Hackxagon Open Source Challenge for its Engineers

    As an initiative to give back to the open source community, Fynd, the unique fashion e-commerce portal had launched gofynd.io, a few months ago. This project enabled the engineers of the fashion e-commerce portal to learn new technologies, improve the core infrastructure and enhance the Fynd platform.

  • Netfilter Workshop 2018 Berlin summary

    Lots of interesting talks happened, mostly surrounding nftables and how to move forward from the iptables legacy world to the new, modern nft framework.

    In a nutshell, the Netfilter project, the FLOSS community driven project, has agreed to consider iptables as a legacy tool. This confidence comes from the maturity of the nftables framework, which is fairly fully-compliant with the old iptables API, including extensions (matches and targets).

  • Using W10Privacy To Boost Ubuntu WSL Performance On Windows 10
  • Get the latest in libre from the FSF Bulletin

    The biannual Free Software Foundation (FSF) Bulletin is now available online. We hope you find it enlightening and entertaining!

  • Introducing PyInstaller

    If you're used to working with a compiled language, the notion that you would need to have a programming language around, not just for development but also for running an application, seems a bit weird. Just because a program was written in C doesn't mean you need a C compiler in order to run it, right?

    But of course, interpreted and byte-compiled languages do require the original language, or a version of it, in order to run. True, Java programs are compiled, but they're compiled into bytecodes then executed by the JVM. Similarly, .NET programs cannot run unless the CLR is present.

    Even so, many of the students in my Python courses are surprised to discover that if you want to run a Python program, you need to have the Python language installed. If you're running Linux, this isn't a problem. Python has come with every distribution I've used since 1995. Sometimes the Python version isn't as modern as I'd like, but the notion of "this computer can't run Python programs" isn't something I've had to deal with very often.

  • Demoting multi-factor authentication

    Authentication was done via a Java applet, as there needs to be a verifiably(?)-secure way to ensure the certificate was properly checked at the client without transfering it over the network. Good thing!

    [...]

    Anyway I accepted, as losing so much time to grade is just too much. And... Yes, many people will be happy. Partly, I'm releieved by this (I have managed to hate Java for over 20 years). I am just saddened by the fact we have lost an almost-decent-enough electronic signature implementation and fallen back to just a user-password scheme. There are many ways to do crypto verification on the client side nowadays; I know JavaScript is sandboxed and cannot escape to touch my filesystem, but... It is amazing we are losing this simple and proven use case.

Linux, the Linux Foundation and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux literally loses its Lustre – HPC filesystem ditched in new kernel

    Linux has literally lost its Lustre – the filesystem favoured by HPC types has vanished in the first release candidate of version 4.18 of the Linux kernel.

    Linus Torvalds’ announcement of the new release lauds the fact it’s shrunk markedly, much of which can be attributed to the removal of Lustre.

    “The removal of Lustre may not be all that notable, because it does look like a lot of the development has been happening out of tree, which may be why it never really ended up working as well as people hoped in the staging tree,” Torvalds wrote. “ Greg [ Kroah-Hartman] clearly got pretty frustrated about it, so now it's gone.”

    How frustrated? Kroah-Hartman explained Lustre's omission by saying it has "been in the kernel tree for over 5 years now" but "has not really moved forward into the 'this is in shape to get out of staging' despite many half-completed attempts."

  • Harmonising open source and standards in the telecom world [Ed: Phone surveillance company pays LF and then (mis)appropriates the “Linux” brand to push its “whitepapers” (marketing)]

    Standards have played a major role in telecommunications technology adoption for many years, validating the commercial viability of new technologies, facilitating multi-vendor interoperability, improving product quality, and expediting the introduction of technologies that would otherwise proliferate in a sea of proprietary alternatives.

  • OpenGL Floating Point Textures No Longer Encumbered By Patents, Enabled In Mesa

    Back in 2012 when talking with Gabe Newell of Valve about open-source/Linux challenges one of the topics he was awed about was patents encumbering the open-source graphics driver progress. Six years later, Timothy Arceri working on the Valve Linux graphics driver team has freed Mesa's ARB_texture_float support from being built conditionally due to these patent fears.

  • Vulkan 1.1.78 Released With Various Issues Resolved

    Vulkan 1.1.78 is now available as the newest version of the Vulkan specification.

    The Vulkan 1.1.78 spec update is another fairly small update that doesn't introduce any new VK extensions or any major changes. Vulkan 1.1.78 has minor documentation fixes, resumes publishing of the Vulkan 1.0 + KHR extension documentation, clears up some behavior in some Vulkan usage, and other changes.

  • AMDGPU Performance Tests With New WattMan-Like Settings, Power Capping

    With the recent stable debut of the Linux 4.17 kernel, one of the most common performance test requests coming in has been for checking out the Radeon WattMan-like support that was introduced with the Linux 4.17 AMDGPU code for recent generations of Radeon graphics card. Here are some benchmarks of that and on a somewhat related note also some Linux gaming benchmark results when carrying out some power capping tests to restrict the graphics card to a given Wattage.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.0.1 Is Coming Next Week

    Just a heads up that Phoronix Test Suite 8.0.1 is slated for release next week if there are any last minute bug reports or requests.

11 Best Linux Gaming Distros You Need To Use In 2018 and Fortnite Coming to Android

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • 11 Best Linux Gaming Distros You Need To Use In 2018

    Gaming on Linux scene is improving each year with better hardware support and increasing support from game developers. Apart from established distros like Ubuntu and Arch Linux, gamers are using Linux gaming distros like Steam OS to get a better experience. The other popular gaming operating systems are Sparky Linux – Gameover edition, Ubuntu GamePack, Lakka Linux, etc.

    Apart from many general-purpose Linux distributions, there exists a crop of distros for specific purposes. Gaming Linux distros too belong to one such category. These distros are specifically built to address your gaming needs, thanks to better hardware support and tons of preinstalled tools.

  • Fortnite: After Nitendo Switch, Android Is The Next Stop

    While the E3 concluded with lots of surprises and striking gaming news, Nitendo came up with its own pandora box. In its E3 presentation, Nitendo released Fortnite version for Switch which can be downloaded through Nitendo eShop.

    It is now absolutely clear that next stop of Epic Games Fortnite would be Android Devices. According to the Fortnite blog, developers are very rigid on summer release of its Android version. In the month of March, Fortnite revealed its iOS version adding to the list of platforms including Xbox One, PS4, PC, iOS and now Nitendo Switch.

Fedora and Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Kubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver upgrades - Results!

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

A month later, two upgrades later, Kubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver is a nicer distribution than what I tested shortly after its official release. But then, it's not perfect. The older box with the Nvidia card returned better results overall, although there were some niggles. On the multi-boot laptop, I wasn't too happy with the slow-boot issue, although this is NOT a Kubuntu-specific problem, as you will learn in a few days. But it still does not give me the razor-sharp confidence I need and expect from an LTS.

In general, Ubuntu-family upgrades are reasonably robust, but they can still be more streamlined, including package removal, third-party repos and odd glitches here and there. I wonder how I'd have felt if I tested Beaver fresh, right now. Alas, I cannot delete the memory of my first encounter. With Trusty, it was just right. Here, it might be right, and I may even end up using - and loving - Plasma Bionic in my prod setup, but it will never be the amazing chemistry I had with 14.04.

But if you're wondering, by all means, worth testing and upgrading, and the post-release Kubuntu Beaver is a pretty slick and tight distro. If I had to judge in isolation, i.e. no early-May scars, then when I combine performance, looks, fonts, media, hardware support, and such, 'tis really neat. Something like 9/10. Now, just waiting for the Men In Black mind-zapping eraser thingie, so I can be blissfully happy. And we're done.

Read more

Unixstickers

Filed under
Just talk

Unixstickers

Awesome products, will definitely get another bunch of some more stickers soon Smile

DragonFlyBSD 5.2.2 Released To Fix The Lazy State Save/Restore Bug

Filed under
BSD

DragonFlyBSD 5.2.2 is now available as the latest stable release to this popular BSD operating system.

While there aren't usually two point releases per cycle for DragonFlyBSD, the v5.2.2 release is coming to address the recent "Lazy FPU" vulnerability affecting Intel CPUs due to Lazy State Save/Restore as the newest CPU speculation bug.

DragonFlyBSD began patching their kernel earlier this month and now those fixes are available in stable form with the DragonFlyBSD 5.2.2 release. The OpenBSD folks have also been changing around their kernel and FreeBSD 11.2 RC3 is also mitigated.

Read more

Canonical/Ubuntu: Canonical's Engineering Tech Lead, Field Product Manager, and Designers'/Developers' Updates

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • A Complete Look At Spectre V1/V2/V4 & Meltdown

    Canonical's Engineering Tech Lead, Gavin Guo, has passed along a big slide deck on a presentation he is preparing about the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities.

    Gavin's presentation is mostly focused on Spectre V2 since that is vulnerable to attacking the host system from a guest VM, but the other vulnerabilities are also covered in his 77-page slide deck with great detail.

  • A unified OpenStack for a scalable open infrastructure

    Stu Miniman and John Boyer of theCUBE interviewed Mark Baker, Field Product Manager, Canonical at the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver. Read on to to find out about OpenStack’s increasing maturity.

    The Kubernetes and OpenStack story isn’t simple. Challenges exist, and plenty of pathfinding still needs to take place when it comes to Kubernetes.

    Customers want to take different approaches with how they want to plug together OpenStack components in order to create a unified stack is complex. Some customers want Kubernetes running alongside OpenStack, or on top of OpenStack, or even OpenStack running on Kubernetes.

  • Design and Web team summary – 18 June 2018

    Welcome to the latest work and updates from the design and web team.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 532

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 532 for the week of June 10 – 16, 2018.

How Linux and Open Tech Empower Medical Healthcare

Filed under
Linux

Open Source is not just for IT industry. Linux and Open Source technologies are impacting Medical and Healthcare industries as well.
Read more

Security: Open Source Security Podcast, New Updates, MysteryBot and Grayshift

Filed under
Security

Containers and 'Clouds'

Filed under
Server
  • [Podcast] PodCTL #39 – CI/CD and Kubernetes

    One of the characteristics of the most successful deployments of OpenShift are the CI/CD pipelines that enable application integrations. This week we dove into a question from a listener – “Can you talk more about best practices for integrating CI/CD systems into Kubernetes?“

    Brian and Tyler talk about the latest news from the Kubernetes community, the difference between CI and CD, and various considerations for integrating CI/CD environments with Kubernetes.

  • Partners See Docker's 'Promise Of Choice' As A Unique Inroad To Enterprise Customers
  • Docker’s Name and Operations Could Appeal to Microsoft, Red Hat, VMware

    Docker Inc. owns one of the most prominent names in the cloud container ecosystem. But a recent report from Cowen and Company named a handful of established cloud players as potential acquirers of Docker Inc. Those included Microsoft, Red Hat, and VMware, with the first two deemed most likely to take the plunge.

    “Despite its strong name recognition and customer momentum, Docker’s long-term financial success – at least as an independent company – is hardly a fait accompli,” the Cowen and Company report stated. “We do believe that Docker will have to work hard in order to overcome its smaller footprint with enterprise companies.”

  • Every Silver Lining Has a Cloud

    The savings in cloud computing comes at the expense of a loss of control over your systems, which is summed up best in the popular nerd sticker that says, "The Cloud is Just Other People's Computers."

Mozilla: Motion, Contributors, Testday, ActivityMonitor, San Francisco Oxidation

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox has a motion team?! Yes we do!

    Motion may sometimes feel like an afterthought or worse yet “polish”. For the release of Firefox Quantum (one of our most significant releases to date), we wanted to ensure that motion was not a second class citizen and that it would play an important role in how users perceived performance in the browser.

    We (Amy & Eric) make up the UX side of the “motion team” for Firefox. We say this in air quotes because the motion team was essentially formed based on our shared belief that motion design is important in Firefox. With a major release planned, we thought this would be the perfect opportunity to have a team working on motion.

  • Firefox 61 new contributors

    With the upcoming release of Firefox 61, we are pleased to welcome the 59 developers who contributed their first code change to Firefox in this release, 53 of whom were brand new volunteers!

  • QMO: Firefox 61 Beta 14 Testday Results

    As you may already know, last Friday – June 15th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 61 Beta 14.

    Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place!

  • IOActivityMonitor in Gecko

    This is a first blog post of a series on Gecko, since I am doing a lot of C++ work in Firefox these days. My current focus is on adding tools in Firefox to try to detect what's going on when something goes rogue in the browser and starts to drain your battery life.

    We have many ideas on how to do this at the developer/user level, but in order to do it properly, we need to have accurate ways to measure what's going on when the browser runs.

    One thing is I/O activity.

    For instance, a WebExtension worker that performs a lot of disk writes is something we want to find out about, and we had nothing to track all I/O activities in Firefox, without running the profiler.

    When Firefox OS was developed, a small feature was added in the Gecko network lib, called NetworkActivityMonitor.

  • San Francisco Oxidation meeting notes

    At last week’s Mozilla All Hands meeting in San Francisco we had an Oxidation meeting about the use of Rust in Firefox. It was low-key, being mostly about status and progress. The notes are here for those who are interested.

Games: Riot Games, Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation, Dead Cells

Filed under
Gaming
  • Riot Games' anti-cheat software for League also targets Linux users

    This week Riot Games implemented a new anti-cheat software for the game that is meant to limit the number of players who use third-party programs while playing. Most of these programs help users cheat in-game, such as by inputting movement commands for a player to allow them to dodge enemy skillshots.

    Unfortunately for players who run Linux as their operating system, the new anti-cheat also targets it as a third-party program, preventing them from playing League. Many players took to Reddit and other forums to protest the change, even creating a petition for Riot to add Linux compatibility.

  • Riot Games New Anti-Cheat Could Wipe Out League of Legends Linux Player Base

    ​Riot Games has been working on a new anti-cheat system for League of Legends. There are reports that this update would make the game unplayable for Linux users, because it would make the game incompatible with virtual environments, something Linux users have to employ to play the game.

  • A small but nice update on Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation and Linux support

    We've been waiting quite a while for any real news on the Linux port of Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [Official Site]. While we still don't know when, we do know it's still happening.

  • Dead Cells, a 'RogueVania' now has a Beta available for Linux

    Dead Cells mixes in elements of a Rogue-lite with a MetroidVania to create an interesting mix and it's now available on Linux with a Beta.

    I did notice in the comments of the previous article, that people were debating the choice of article title. I said it was a "rogue-lite metroidvania action-platformer", which was obviously a bit wrong. They've actually coined their own term for it, calling it a "RogueVania".

"Microsoft may find the developers it just paid so much to reach slipping from its grasp."

Filed under
Development
Microsoft
  • Mixed Reaction
  • After Github purchase, Microsoft remains a relatively untrusted open source player to some
  • What is GitHub?

    GitHub is now the de facto home of open-source software. But Microsoft’s acquisition reignited a debate over the platform’s centrality. Microsoft assures users the service is safe under its stewardship, but many are wary. When Mr Ballmer spoke of developers, he had a specific sort in mind: those using Microsoft’s tools to build projects for Microsoft products. He once called open-source Linux a “cancer”, which would spread uncontrollably. In a sense, his words proved prophetic: today, open-source software is everywhere, from websites to financial markets to self-driving cars. Under Mr Nadella’s leadership, Microsoft has embraced open-source development. In buying GitHub it hopes to gain the trust of developers it once spurned. But some wonder if the change is complete, or if Microsoft will use its newly bought dominance of open-source hosting to push its own products. Alternatives to GitHub—some themselves open-source—wait in the wings. If it is not careful, Microsoft may find the developers it just paid so much to reach slipping from its grasp.

Making Free Software Suffer Using New Laws

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • Free software is at risk in the EU -- take action now

    Members of the European Parliament want to turn upload platforms like GitLab into "censorship machines" that require user-uploaded materials to be monitored and automatically filtered, a process which would prevent modified and reused code from being uploaded. This provision is covered under Article 13 of the Copyright Directive.

    If Article 13, embedded within the proposal, becomes official policy, it will be impossible for developers to build off of one another's code -- which is not only a blow to the collaborative development of free software, but a push against the basic freedoms of free software. Software isn't free unless it can be modified and shared. Article 13 will affect all users of free software -- as development of free software suffers, the quality and availability of updates, new features, and new programs will also suffer.

  • Open Source Industry Australia Says Zombie TPP Could Destroy Free Software Licensing

    Without the ability to enforce compliance through the use of injunctions, open source licenses would once again be pointless. Although the OSIA is concerned about free software in Australia, the same logic would apply to any TPP-11 country. It would also impact other nations that joined the Pacific pact later, as the UK is considering (the UK government seems not to have heard of the gravity theory for trade). It would presumably apply to the US if it did indeed rejoin the pact, as has been mooted. In other words, the impact of this section on open source globally could be significant.

    It's worth remembering why this particular article is present in TPP. It grew out of concerns that nations like China and Russia were demanding access to source code as a pre-requisite of allowing Western software companies to operate in their countries. Article 14.17 was designed as a bulwark against such demands. It's unlikely that it was intended to destroy open source licensing too, although some spotted early on that this was a risk. And doubtless a few big software companies will be only too happy to see free software undermined in this way. Unfortunately, it's probably too much to hope that the Australian Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence & Trade will care about or even understand this subtle software licensing issue. The fate of free software in Australia will therefore depend on whether TPP-11 comes into force, and if so, what judges think Article 14.17 means.

Fedora: Anaconda Improvements, Greenboot, Fedora Scientific Vagrant Boxes and Abhishek

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Anaconda improvements in Fedora 28

    Fedora 28 was released last month, and the major update brought with it a raft of new features for the Fedora Installer (Anaconda). Like Fedora, Anaconda is a dynamic software project with new features and updates every release. Some changes are user visible, while others happen under the hood — making Anaconda more robust and prepared for future improvements.

  • Lorbus: Introducing: greenboot

    Not too long ago, I applied to Google Summer of Code for the student scholarship position together with a Fedora project ideated by Peter Robinson, who is the principal IoT architect at Red Hat, named Fedora IoT: Atomic Host Upgrade Daemon. As you may be guessing by now, I was very fortunate and the proposal was accepted! The coding phase started on the 14th of May and in this blog post I’ll try to give a little insight into my first month working on the project.

  • Pre-release Fedora Scientific Vagrant Boxes

    I am very excited to share that sometime back the Fedora project gave the go ahead on my idea of making Fedora Scientific available as Vagrant boxes starting with Fedora 29. This basically means (I think) that using Fedora Scientific in a virtual machine is even easier.

  • [Week 5] GSoC Status Report for Fedora App: Abhishek
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More in Tux Machines

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 12:48pm
Story Linux, the Linux Foundation and Graphics Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 12:46pm
Story 11 Best Linux Gaming Distros You Need To Use In 2018 and Fortnite Coming to Android Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 12:44pm
Story Fedora and Red Hat Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 12:39pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 11:18am
Story Kubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver upgrades - Results! Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 11:16am
Blog entry Unixstickers Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 10:47am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 10:05am
Story DragonFlyBSD 5.2.2 Released To Fix The Lazy State Save/Restore Bug Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 9:55am
Story Canonical/Ubuntu: Canonical's Engineering Tech Lead, Field Product Manager, and Designers'/Developers' Updates Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2018 - 9:32am