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Saturday, 24 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Games and Wine: Ash of Gods: Redemption, Doom 2016 and More Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2018 - 7:37pm
Story GNOME Desktop Schedule Published Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2018 - 6:48pm
Story Super long-term kernel support Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2018 - 5:38pm
Story LibreSSL 2.7.1 Released, OpenSSH 7.7 Being Tested Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2018 - 3:58pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2018 - 1:02pm
Story Programming: Python 2.*, Functional Computation, and Plagiarism in CS Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2018 - 12:29pm
Story Debian: Turris Omnia With Debian, ClojureSYNC, Debconf 2018 Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2018 - 12:15pm
Story Mozilla: Facebook-Mozilla Rift, MDN, No More Notifications (If You Want) Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2018 - 12:12pm
Story EUPL planned actions Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2018 - 12:10pm
Story Security: Dropbox, FUD, CNCF, 'Cloud' Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2018 - 12:06pm

Games and Wine: Ash of Gods: Redemption, Doom 2016 and More

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  • Turn-based RPG Ash of Gods: Redemption is now out with day-1 Linux support

    For those in need of a good story game with turn-based battles and RPG elements, Ash of Gods: Redemption [GOG, Steam] is now out with day-1 Linux support.

    The developer sadly hasn't yet responded to our emails, but thankfully GOG sent over a copy today. BTRE will be taking a proper look at it once he's had plenty of time with it. Sounds like a very interesting game, so I look forward to reading his thoughts.

  • Doom (2016) could have been on Linux, id Software made a Linux version sound easy to do

    Doom 2016 supports Vulkan and at GDC this year developers from id Software talked a little about it, including how easy a Linux version could have been.

    In response to this question from Alon Or-bach (Samsung): "One of the hot topics around Vulkan in terms of cross-platform and how much benefit do you find of having one API that's targetting both mobile and desktop platforms".

  • Latest AMDGPU DC Plays Nicer With Raven Ridge But Still Linux Gaming Stability Issues

    Back in February was the exciting AMD Raven Ridge desktop APU launch with the Zen CPU cores and Vega graphics. Sadly, however, the Raven Ridge Linux support still appears to be a bit problematic but there have been improvements in recent weeks.

  • Wine Vulkan Patches Prepping For Direct3D 12 / VKD3D

    CodeWeavers' Józef Kucia has sent out a set of patches today against Winevulkan in shifting around some code in preparing to allow for the eventual Direct3D 12 support that's implemented on top of Vulkan by the external VKD3D library.

    Wine Vulkan has been rapidly advancing in recent weeks for allowing Vulkan API support within Wine using an ICD approach to make it easy to run Vulkan games on Wine like Wolfenstein or Doom as well as projects like DXVK for implementing high-performance Direct3D 11 atop Vulkan.

GNOME Desktop Schedule Published

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  • GNOME 3.29.x Development Series

    GNOME 3.29.x is an unstable development series intended for testing and hacking purposes. GNOME uses odd minor version numbers to indicate development status, so this unstable 3.29.x series will become the official 3.30 stable release. There are many ways you can get involved.

  • GNOME 3.30 Scheduled For Release On 6 September

    Following this month's successful launch of GNOME 3.28, the release team has now assembled the schedule for the GNOME 3.30.0 release and the 3.29 development milestones.

    GNOME 3.29.1 is the first step towards GNOME 3.30 and will be released on 19 April followed by GNOME 3.29.92 a month later on 24 May. For June is then GNOME 3.29.3 and GNOME 3.29.4 on 19 July.

  • GNOME 3.30 "Almeria" Desktop Environment Slated for Release on September 6, 2018

    The GNOME Project announced today the availability of the official release schedule for the next major release of their widely-used GNOME desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions.

    While most of the Linux community hasn't yet managed to install the recently released GNOME 3.28 desktop environment on their favorite GNU/Linux distributions, the GNOME developers are already focusing on the next major release, GNOME 3.30, which was slated for release this fall on September 6, 2018.

Super long-term kernel support

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In the longer-term, CIP is looking toward IEC-62443 security certification. That is an ambitious goal and CIP can't get there by itself, but the project is working on documentation, test cases, and tools that will hopefully help with an eventual certification effort. Another issue that must be on the radar of any project like this is the year-2038 problem, which currently puts a hard limit on how long a Linux system can be supported. CIP is working with kernel and libc developers to push solutions forward in this area.

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LibreSSL 2.7.1 Released, OpenSSH 7.7 Being Tested

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Programming: Python 2.*, Functional Computation, and Plagiarism in CS

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  • 1.5 Year Warning: Python2 will be End of Lifed

    The end of upstream Python 2.7 support will be January 1, 2020 (2020-01-01) and the Fedora Project is working out what to do with it. As Fedora 29 would be released in 2019-11 and would get 1.5 years of support, the last release which would be considered supportable would be the upcoming release of Fedora 28. This is why the current Python maintainers are looking to orphan python2. They have made a list of the packages that would be affected by this and have started a discussion on the Fedora development lists, but people who only see notes of this from blogs or LWN posts may not have seen it yet.

  • Why is functional programming seen as the opposite of OOP rather than an addition to it?

    So: both OOP and functional computation can be completely compatible (and should be!). There is no reason to munge state in objects, and there is no reason to invent “monads” in FP. We just have to realize that “computers are simulators” and figure out what to simulate.

  • Why we still can’t stop plagiarism in undergraduate computer science

    The most important goal is to keep the course fair for students who do honest work. Instructors must assign grades that accurately reflect performance. A student who grapples with a problem — becoming a stronger programmer in the process — should never receive a lower grade than one who copies and pastes.


    University administrators should communicate their support. Instructors should know that, not only will they suffer no retaliation, but that the university encourages them to enforce university policies. This might require administrators to acknowledge the inconvenient truth of widespread plagiarism.

Debian: Turris Omnia With Debian, ClojureSYNC, Debconf 2018

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  • Using the switch on Turris Omnia with Debian

    After installing Debian on Turris Omnia there are a few more steps needed to make use of the network switch.

    The Armada 385 CPU provides three network interfaces. Two are connected to the switch (but only one of them is used to "talk" to the switch), and one is routed directly to the WAN port.

  • ClojureSYNC Talk Resources
  • Debconf 2018, MATE 1.2.0, libqalculate transition etc

    First up is news on Debconf 2018 which will be held in Hsinchu, Taiwan. Apparently, the CFP or Call for Proposals was made just a few days ago and I probably forgot to share about it. Registration has also been opened now.

    The only thing most people have to figure out is how to get a system-generated certificate, make sure to have an expiry date, I usually have a year, make it at least 6 months as you would need to put up your proposal for contention and let the content-team decide it on the proposal merit. This may at some point move from alioth to salsa as the alioth service is going away.

    The best advice I can give is to put your proposal in and keep reworking/polishing it till the end date for applications is near. At the same time do not over commit yourself. From a very Indian perspective and somebody who has been to one debconf, you can think of the debconf as a kind of ‘khumb‘ Mela or gathering as you will. You can definitely network with all the topics and people you care for, but the most rewarding are those talks which were totally unplanned for. Also it does get crazy sometime so it’s nice if you are able to have some sane time for yourself even if it just a 5-10 minute walk.

Mozilla: Facebook-Mozilla Rift, MDN, No More Notifications (If You Want)

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  • Mozilla stops Facebook advertising, demands privacy changes

    It’s probably not top of Mark Zuckerberg’s worry list this week but Mozilla Corporation, developer of the Firefox browser, is officially unhappy with Facebook.

  • Results of the MDN “Competitive Content Analysis” SEO experiment

    The next SEO experiment I’d like to discuss results for is the MDN “Competitive Content Analysis” experiment. In this experiment, performed through December into early January, involved selecting two of the top search terms that resulted in MDN being included in search results—one of them where MDN is highly-placed but not at #1, and one where MDN is listed far down in the search results despite having good content available.

    The result is a comparison of the quality of our content and our SEO against other sites that document these technology areas. With that information in hand, we can look at the competition’s content and make decisions as to what changes to make to MDN to help bring us up in the search rankings.

  • No More Notifications (If You Want)

    Online, your attention is priceless. That’s why every site in the universe wants permission to send you notifications about new stuff. It can be distracting at best and annoying at worst. The latest version of Firefox for desktop lets you block those requests and many others.

EUPL planned actions

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A revised set of guidelines and recommendations on the use of the open source licence EUPL v1.2 published by the Commission on 19 May 2017 will be developed, involving the DIGIT unit B.3 (Reusable Solutions) and the JRC 1.4 (Joint Research Centre – Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer). The existing licence wizard will be updated. New ways of promoting public administrations' use of open source will be investigated and planned (such as hackathons or app challenges on open source software). The target date for the release of this set of guidelines on the use of the European Public Licence EUPL v1.2, including a modified Licence Wizard, is planned Q2 2018.

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Security: Dropbox, FUD, CNCF, 'Cloud'

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  • Dropbox has some genuinely great security reporting guidelines, but reserves the right to jail you if you disagree

    Dropbox's position, however reasonable in many of its aspects, is woefully deficient, because the company reserves the right to invoke DMCA 1201 and/or CFAA and other tools that give companies the power to choose who can say true things abour mistakes they've made.

    This is not normal. Before DRM in embedded software and cloud connectivity, became routine there were no restrictions on who could utter true words about defects in a product. [...]

  • Hackers Infect Linux Servers With Monero Miner via 5-Year-Old Vulnerability [Ed: A five-year-old vulnerability implies total neglect by sysadmins, not a GNU/Linux weakness]

    Attackers also modified the local cron jobs to trigger a "watchd0g" Bash script every three minutes, a script that checked to see if the Monero miner was still active and restarted XMRig's process whenever it was down.

  • GitHub: Our dependency scan has found four million security flaws in public repos [Ed: No, GitHub just ran a scan for old versions being used and reused. It cannot do this for proprietary software, but the issues are there and the risks are no better.]

    GitHub says its security scan for old vulnerabilities in JavaScript and Ruby libraries has turned up over four million bugs and sparked a major clean-up by project owners.

    The massive bug-find total was reached within a month of the initiative's launch in November, when GitHub began scanning for known vulnerabilities in certain popular open-source libraries and notifying project owners that they should be using an updated version.

  • Envoy CNCF Project Completes Security Audit, Delivers New Release

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) has begun a process of performing third-party security audits for its projects, with the first completed audit coming from the Envoy proxy project.

    The Envoy proxy project was created by ride-sharing company Lyft and officially joined the CNCF in September 2017. Envoy is a service mesh reverse proxy technology that is used to help scale micro-services data traffic.

  • Hybrid cloud security: Emerging lessons [Ed: 'Cloud' and security do not belong in the same headline because 'cloud' is a data breach, typically involving a company giving all its (and customers') data to some spying giant abroad]

A Look At The Relative Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation Costs On Windows vs. Linux

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The latest in our Windows versus Linux benchmarking is looking at the relative performance impact on both Linux and Windows of their Spectre and Meltdown mitigation techniques. This round of tests were done on Windows 10 Pro, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and Clear Linux when having an up-to-date system on each OS where there is Spectre/Meltdown protection and then repeating the same benchmarks after reverting/disabling the security functionality.

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Raspberry Pi atmospheric sensor HAT can detect distant explosions

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OSOP’s $179 and up “Raspberry Boom” Raspberry Pi HAT add-on detects infrasound from volcanoes, explosions, and rockets. A $299 and up Shake and Boom HAT adds a seismograph.

Panama-based OSOP, which found Kickstarter success with its Raspberry Shake seismograph add-on board for the Raspberry Pi, has now returned with a Raspberry Boom add-on board and infrasound sensor that detects inaudible sound. The same Kickstarter campaign is also selling a new Raspberry Shake and Boom product that combines the Boom with the seismograph capabilities of the Shake. Both products can tap into OSOPs large citizen science network to detect real-time events around the world.

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Wireless crazed Orange Pi boasts 4G LTE, WiFi, BT, FM, and GPS

The “Orange Pi 4G-IOT” SBC that runs Android 6.0 on a quad -A53 MediaTek MT6737 SoC, and offers a 40-pin header, WiFi, Bluetooth, FM, GPS, a 4G LTE radio, and fingerprint sensor support.

Shenzhen Xunlong open spec Orange Pi 4G-IOT SBC, which just launched for $45 on AliExpress, is the most wireless savvy Orange Pi to date. The open-spec SBC includes an unnamed, 4G LTE radio module with mini-SIM card slot, as well as a combo module that includes WiFi, Bluetooth, FM, and GPS. There is also support for a fingerprint sensor.

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today's leftovers

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  • Linux More Popular than Windows in Stack Overflow's 2018 Developer Survey

    Stack Overflow, the largest and most trusted online community for developers, published the results of their annual developer survey, held throughout January 2018.

    More than 100,000 developers participated in this year's Annual Developer Survey, which included several new topics ranging from ethics in coding to artificial intelligence (AI). The results are finally here and reveal the fact that some technologies and operating systems have become more popular than others in the past year.

  • History of containers

    I’ve researched these dates several times now over the years, in preparation for several talks. So I’m posting it here for my own future reference.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E03 – The Three Musketeers - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Best Desktop Environment

    Thanks to its stability, performance, feature set and a loyal following, the K Desktop Environment (KDE) won Best Desktop Environment in this year's Linux Journal Readers' Choice Awards.

  • Renata D'Avila: Pushing a commit to a different repo

    My Outreachy internship with Debian is over. I'm still going to write an article about it, to let everyone know what I worked on towards the ending, but I simply didn't have the time yet to sit down and compile all the information.

Software: GTK-VNC, GNOME Shell and More

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Devices: Mintbox Mini, NanoNote (Part 3), MV3

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  • Mintbox Mini 2: Compact Linux desktop with Apollo Lake quad-core CPU

    The Mintbox Mini 2 is a fanless computer that measures 4.4″ x 3.3″ x 1.3″ and weighs about 12 ounces. It’s powered by a 10W Intel Celeron J3455 quad-core processor.

  • Linux Mint ditches AMD for Intel with new Mintbox Mini 2

    While replacing Windows 10 with a Linux-based operating system is a fairly easy exercise, it shouldn’t be necessary. Look, if you want a computer running Linux, you should be able to buy that. Thankfully you can, as companies like System76 and Dell sell laptops and desktops with Ubuntu or Ubuntu-based operating systems.

    Another option? Buy a Mintbox! This is a diminutive desktop running Linux Mint — an Ubuntu-based OS. Today, the newest such variant — The Mintbox Mini 2 — makes an appearance. While the new model has several new aspects, the most significant is that the Linux Mint Team has switched from AMD to Intel (the original Mini used an A4-Micro 6400T).

  • Porting L4Re and Fiasco.OC to the Ben NanoNote (Part 3)

    So, we find ourselves in a situation where the compiler is doing the right thing for the code it is generating, but it also notices when the programmer has chosen to do what is now the wrong thing. We must therefore track down these instructions and offer a supported alternative. Previously, we introduced a special configuration setting that might be used to indicate to the compiler when to choose these alternative sequences of instructions: CPU_MIPS32_R1. This gets expanded to CONFIG_CPU_MIPS32_R1 by the build system and it is this identifier that gets used in the program code.

  • Linux Software Enables Advanced Functions on Controllers

    At NPE2018, SISE presents its new generation of multi-zone controllers (MV3). Soon, these controllers will be able to control as many as 336 zones. They are available in five sizes (XS, S, M, L and XL) with three available power cards (2.5 A, 15 A and 30 A). They are adaptable to the packaging, automotive, cosmetics, medical and technical-parts markets.

Linux Foundation: Microsoft Openwashing,, OCP, Kernel Commits Statistics

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  • More Tips for Managing a Fast-Growing Open Source Project [Ed: Microsoft has infiltrated the Linux Foundation so deeply and severely that the Foundation now regularly issues openwashing pieces for the company that attacks Linux]
  • improves Kubernetes networking in sixth software release, one of Linux Foundation’s open source projects, has introduced its 18.01 software release with a focus on improving Kubernetes Networking, Istio and cloud native NFV.

  • Bolsters Kubernetes, NFV, and Istio Support With Latest Release

    The Fast Data Project ( released its sixth update since its inception within the Linux Foundation two years ago. While the update list is extensive, most are focused on Kubernetes networking, cloud native network functions virtualization (NFV), and Istio.

  • Linux Foundation, OCP collaborate on open sourcing hardware and software

    The virtualization of network functions has resulted in a disaggregation of hardware and software, increasing interest in open source projects for both layers in return. To feed this interest, the Linux Foundation and Open Compute Project (OCP) recently announced a joint initiative to advance the development of software and hardware-based open source networking.

    Both organizations have something to offer the other through the collaboration. The Linux Foundation’s OPNFV project integrates OCP as well as other open source software projects into relevant network functions virtualization (NFV) reference architectures. At the same time, OCP offers an open source option for the hardware layer.

  • Kernel Commits with "Fixes" tag

    Over the past 5 years there has been a steady increase in the number of kernel bug fix commits that use the "Fixes" tag.  Kernel developers use this annotation on a commit to reference an older commit that originally introduced the bug, which is obviously very useful for bug tracking purposes. What is interesting is that there has been a steady take-up of developers using this annotation:

Fedora: Fedora 28 Beta Delay, Mindshare Monthly Report and More

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Red Hat
  • Fedora 28 release dates and schedule

    With the release of Fedora 27, the Fedora 28 release schedule is falling into place. As of now, the current Fedora 28 release schedule is as follows.

  • Fedora 28 Beta Has Been Delayed

    It's time for the Fedora 28 release dance and to place your bets if F28 will be released on time or is another Fedora release challenged by release delays.

    Fedora 28 Beta had been due for release next week but has now been set by its first delay. Fortunately, a buffer was already built into the release schedule so for now is not impacting the final release of Fedora 28 due out in May.

  • Fedora 28 Beta status is NO-GO

    Release status of the Fedora 28 Beta is NO-GO. Due to missing RC for the F28 Beta release and presence of blocker bugs, the decision is “No Go”. The Beta release slips for one week to “Target #1” date (April 3rd). We are not going to slip the Final GA yet.

  • Mindshare Monthly Report – FAD and First Actions
  • Digitizing VHS with Fedora

    I have a dozen or so movies on VHS that we still watch. To be honest, I'm not that concerned about the commercial movies; those are easy enough to replace. But what about our home movies? My high school cross country team videos and my wife's marching band videos, among others—you won't find those on Netflix anytime soon. So I decided it was time to get serious about something I'd been meaning to do for a long time: Digitize my VHS tapes.

    In this article, I'll describe how I set up my Fedora desktop to convert my VHS tapes into 1s and 0s. Previously, Don Watkins described a different setup for VHS conversion.

  • Fedora 27 : The LibreOffice the 6.0.2 and versions.
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