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Monday, 18 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The Smallest Server Suite Now Ships with Linux 4.9.69 LTS and OpenSSL 1.0.2n

Filed under
Linux

A minor update to the 23.0 stable series, TheSSS 23.2 is here about three weeks after version 23.1 to update a few core components of its built-in LAMP (Linux, Apache, MariaDB, and PHP) server. Therefore, the live system now runs Linux kernel 4.9.69 LTS, Apache 2.4.29, MariaDB 10.2.11, and PHP 7.0.26.

PHP 5.6.32 is installed as well to provide users with extra compatibility for older PHP5 scripts, and TheSSS 23.2 also ships with the latest OpenSSL 1.0.2n commercial-grade Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS) toolkit and Stunnel 5.44 proxy tool.

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Linux Foundation: New Silver Members, OpenContrail, and Xen

Filed under
Linux
Server
  • The Linux Foundation Announces 21 New Silver Members

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced the addition of 21 Silver members. Linux Foundation members help support development of the greatest shared technology resources in history, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation.

  • Juniper transfers OpenContrail project to the Linux Foundation

    Juniper Networks is handing over the governance of the OpenContrail project to the Linux Foundation.

    OpenContrail is an open source network virtualization platform aimed at cloud environments and dealing mainly with the control plane - responsible for traffic routing. Juniper will continue developing and selling a commercial, fully supported version of the software, called simply Contrail.

  • The Linux Foundation Simplifies Xen Hypervisor Usage

    Cloud service providers tend to favor various implementations of the open source Xen hypervisor because it’s simply not cost effective for them to pay to license a commercial hypervisor at scale. It’s not clear to what degree enterprise IT organizations will want to follow suit. But The Linux Foundation that oversees development of Xen aims to increase the appeal of Xen by making available a more streamlined version that is simpler to use.

    George Dunlap, a Xen Project Contributor and a senior engineer at Citrix, says version 4.10 of the Xen Hypervisor Project includes a new user interface in addition to a trusted computing base (TCB) that has been made smaller and, by extension, more secure. The expectation is that a more compact implementation of Xen will not only consume fewer system resources, but also reduce the overall attack surface exposed, says Dunlap. Those attributes should make Xen a more attractive option, for example, in Internet of Things (IoT) projects where licensing a commercial hypervisor is likely to prove cost prohibitive, adds Dunlap.

  • The Xen Project Welcomes Bitdefender to its Advisory Board

    The Xen Project, a project hosted at The Linux Foundation, today announced Bitdefender, a leading global cybersecurity technology company protecting 500 million users worldwide, is a new Advisory Board member. The Xen Project Advisory Board consists of major cloud companies, virtualization providers, enterprises, and silicon vendors, among others, that advise and support the development of Xen Project software for cloud computing, embedded, IoT use-cases, automotive and security applications.

  • Xen Project Member Spotlight: Bitdefender

    The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project, and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.

What Are Containers and Why Should You Care?

Filed under
Server

What are containers? Do you need them? Why? In this article, we aim to answer some of these basic questions.

But, to answer these questions, we need more questions. When you start considering how containers might fit into your world, you need to ask: Where do you develop your application? Where do you test it and where is it deployed?

Read more

Linux: 4.14.7, 4.9.70, 4.4.106, 3.18.88, Four stable kernels

Filed under
Linux

How to Market an Open Source Project

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The widely experienced and indefatigable Deirdré Straughan presented a talk at Open Source Summit NA on how to market an open source project. Deirdré currently works with open source at Amazon Web Services (AWS), although she was not representing the company at the time of her talk. Her experience also includes stints at Ericsson, Joyent, and Oracle, where she worked with cloud and open source over several years.

Through it all, Deirdré said, the main mission in her career has been to “help technologies grow and thrive through a variety of marketing and community activities.” This article provides highlights of Deirdré’s talk, in which she explained common marketing approaches and why they’re important for open source projects.

Read more

Bluetooth Linux Stack Gets Improvements for Bluetooth LE Joypads, Other Devices

Filed under
Linux

First off, for the ShanWan PS3 joypad (a PlayStation 3 controller clone), they managed to disable the rumble motor that currently starts immediately after you plug the controller into the USB port of your Linux computer, as well as to hard-code the HID service that the joypad was supposed to offer but it didn't because it's not Bluetooth compliant.

"The SHANWAN PS3 clone joypad will start its rumble motors as soon as it is plugged in via USB. As the additional USB interrupt does nothing on the original PS3 Sixaxis joypads, and makes a number of other clone joypads actually start sending data, disable that call for the SHANWAN so the rumble motors aren't started on plug," reads the kernel patch.

Read more

Raspberry Pi 3 OS RaspAnd Now Ships with TeamViewer 13, Based on Android Nougat

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Linux

Still based on Google's Android 7.1.2 Nougat mobile operating system, RaspAnd Build 171215 comes with the GAPPS (Google Apps) package pre-installed offering users a working Google Play Store to install Android apps, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi improvements, and the latest TeamViewer 13 for controlling other PCs from a Raspberry Pi 3 SBC.

"The video performance is generally much better than in previous versions," writes Arne Exton in the release announcement. "Your Wi-Fi connection is stable and it will reconnect after every reboot of your Raspberry Pi 3. RaspAnd Nougat 7.1.2 Build 171215 is an Android 7.1.2 Nougat system which can run on Raspberry Pi 3."

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GNU: GnuCash 2.6.19 and GCC 7.3 Status Report

Filed under
GNU
  • GnuCash 2.6.19

    GnuCash is a personal and small business finance application, freely licensed under the GNU GPL and available for GNU/Linux, BSD, Solaris, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows. It’s designed to be easy to use, yet powerful and flexible. GnuCash allows you to track your income and expenses, reconcile bank accounts, monitor stock portfolios and manage your small business finances. It is based on professional accounting principles to ensure balanced books and accurate reports.

    GnuCash can keep track of your personal finances in as much detail as you prefer. If you are just starting out, use GnuCash to keep track of your checkbook. You may then decide to track cash as well as credit card purchases to better determine where your money is being spent. When you start investing, you can use GnuCash to help monitor your portfolio. Buying a vehicle or a home? GnuCash will help you plan the investment and track loan payments. If your financial records span the globe, GnuCash provides all the multiple-currency support you need.

  • GCC 7.3 Status report

    GCC 7 is in regression and documentation fixes mode and it is time
    to think about backports you want/need to do for GCC 7.3. The plan
    is to do a release candidate for GCC 7.3 in the second week of January
    following by a release a week after that.

  • GCC 7.3 Is Being Released Next Month

    Richard Biener of SUSE is preparing to release GCC 7.3 next month.

    GCC 7 has been in only a regression/bug-fix mode for many months now and GCC 7.3 will be the latest installment of that with all of the latest fixes. But right now there are twenty-two more P2 regressions (161 in total) since the last update and overall that puts them at 174 P1-P3 regressions.

Applications: Gradio, PDF Editors (LibreOffice), Cozy, MuPDF, Atom and More

Filed under
Software
  • New Version of Linux Radio Player ‘Gradio’ Released

    Talking of finding stations, the ‘add station’ and ‘search’ pages are now combined, while the Library no longer contains a separate tab for collections. The collection feature is still included, but is now surfaced when selecting multiple stations in the library.

    Various parts of the UI have been tweaked, including the selection toolbar, application menu and the collections popover.

    And, for peace of mind, your connection to the community-powered radio-browser.info database is now encrypted.

  • Best Free PDF Editors For PC, Mac, Linux, Android & iOS

    LibreOffice is one of the best free Office alternatives to Microsoft Office suite. You also get the ability to open and edit the PDF files. If your PDF file contains just pictures/graphics, LibreOffice will automatically suggest the drawing tools to let you modify it. In case of text-oriented documents, you will get the necessary word formatting tools to help you edit it.The user interface may not be the best around but LibreOffice is a free-to-use open-source software with no purchases required.

  • Linux Release Roundup: Cozy, MuPDF, Atom + More

    It’s a Sunday, which means it’s time for me to round-up a rabble of recent Linux releases that did get a mention during the week.

    With a lot of people busy getting ready for Christmas (and other festivals that happen this time of year) there aren’t too many major releases to mention from the past week, but there is a modest set of minor updates issued you may want to know about.

    This might be the final Linux Release Roundup before Xmas. If, like some sort of weekly Santa, you only pop by to read these posts I’ll use this moment to say thank you, and wish you a merry denomatively-appropriate holiday.

Graphics: XWayland, AMD, and DRM

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • GNOME's Mutter Now Supports XWayland Keyboard Grabbing, XDG-Output

    More (X)Wayland improvements are en route for GNOME 3.28.

    The latest addition to the Mutter Wayland compositor is now handling XWayland keyboard grab support so an XWayland/X11 client can exclusively grab the keyboard input. And as part of that a new setting for controlling if XWayland clients can do keyboard grabs.

  • The Architecture Of XWayland To Let X11 Apps Run On Wayland

    ekka Paalanen of Collabora has begun the overdue task of providing documentation on XWayland.

    While XWayland has been around for a few years in allowing X11 applications/games run atop on an X.Org Server, up to now it's not been officially documented. Pekka has taken up the task of starting to document XWayland within the Wayland Git repository's documentation.

  • OpenGL 4.3 Support Lands In R600 Gallium3D Driver

    In between hacking on the RADV Vulkan driver, David Airlie has found the time to land his patches enabling OpenGL 4.3 and GLSL 430 support within Mesa 17.4-dev Git for the R600g driver.

    The R600g driver is now able to officially expose OpenGL 4.3 support. But the big caveat is that's only for the R600g-using hardware exposing FP64 support right now... That means just the Radeon HD 5800 series and HD 6900 Cayman series... All the rest of the HD 5000/6000 series and other R600g-supported hardware is still limited to OpenGL 3.3 support.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Lands Support For External Fences

    Even with AMD open-sourcing their official Vulkan driver any day now, David Airlie, Bas Nieuwenhuizen, and others independently continue to advance the dissenting RADV Vulkan driver.

    The latest to report on RADV is that it now supports external fences and the associated VK_KHR_external_fence_fd extension. External fences for Vulkan is about allowing synchronized access to external memory using fences. Vulkan external memory in turn is about memory outside of the scope of the logical device and can be used for multi-process/device handling and among the current use-cases for Vulkan external memory is SteamVR on Linux.

  • Libdrm 2.4.89 Released With Leasing & Synchronization Object APIs

    The libdrm Mesa DRM library that principally sits as the interface between Mesa and the kernel Direct Rendering Manager drivers is out with a big update.

    David Airlie released libdrm 2.4.89 as the latest version of this important library. New in this libdrm update is the new DRM mode lease ioctl wrappers, part of Keith Packard's work on DRM leasing added to the Linux 4.15 kernel as part of improving VR HMD support on Linux.

Programming/Development: Most In-Demand Programming Languages and More

Filed under
Development
  • Top 7 Most In-Demand Programming Languages Of 2018: Coding Dojo

    Most of the fields in the tech industry demand a regular learning from you as they are dynamic in nature. You need to be up-to-date with the latest trends and make sure that your skillset matches the needs of your target industry.

    For developers, this change becomes even more necessary. For example, today’s mobile app developers need to eventually make a shift from Java and Objective-C to Kotlin and Swift, respectively. This growing adoption and demand is reflected clearly in different lists of the popular programming languages.

    [...]

    Coding Dojo analyzed the data from job listing website Indeed.com. This job posting data revolved around twenty-five programming languages, frameworks, and stacks. It’s worthing noting that some most loved programming languages like Ruby and Swift didn’t make the cut as their demand was lower as compared to other biggies. The other growing languages that didn’t make the cut were R and Rust.

  • The proof is in the pudding

    I wrote these when I woke up one night and had trouble getting back to sleep, and spent a while in a very philosophical mood thinking about life, success, and productivity as a programmer.

  • littler 0.3.3

    The fourth release of littler as a CRAN package is now available, following in the now more than ten-year history as a package started by Jeff in 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later.

    littler is the first command-line interface for R and predates Rscript. In my very biased eyes better as it allows for piping as well shebang scripting via #!, uses command-line arguments more consistently and still starts faster. Last but not least it is also less silly than Rscript and always loads the methods package avoiding those bizarro bugs between code running in R itself and a scripting front-end.

Games: Project 5: Sightseer, 'Jupiter Hell', Dimension Drive, Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes, Counter-Strike

Filed under
Gaming

Liberated Linux Drivers Help AMD 'Transparency'

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
OSS
  • AMD Navi spotted in Linux drivers

    The architecture name is hidden under SUPER_SECRET codename. Normally we would be seeing the real name of the GPU, but AMD is likely trying to avoid generating hype for architecture which is still months away (I heard something about late 2018), hence the secret.

  • AMD’s next-gen GPU has been spotted in Linux drivers

    With AMD’s RX Vega now out and about, it is time to start looking towards the future. We’ve known for some time that Vega will be followed up by ‘Navi’ at some point between 2018 and 2020. Now, we know that progress is being made as AMD’s next-gen GPU has appeared in a new driver.

  • AMD's Next Gen Navi GPU Architecture Found Referenced In Linux Drivers

    This has been a big year for AMD, there is no doubt about that. Having launched a new CPU and GPU architectures (Zen and Vega, respectively), the company thrust itself back into relevancy in the high-end market, whereas previously the top shelf was the exclusive domain of rival Intel. So, what's next? On the GPU side, AMD is expected to roll out its Navi architecture sometime next year, with references to its next generation GPU already showing up in driver code.

  • AMD 7nm “Super Secret” Navi GPU Spotted In Driver, 2H 2018 Launch Expected

    AMD’s upcoming next generation 7nm based graphics architecture code named “Navi” has been spotted in Linux driver code. The all new GPU architecture is officially slated to debut next year, with all whispers indicating a debut in the latter half of the year.

ScummVM 2.0

Filed under
Gaming
  • ScummVM 2.0 Released To Relive Some Gaming Classics

    ScummVM 2.0 has been released as a major update to this open-source game engine recreation project.

    ScummVM has advanced well past just supporting the original LucasArts adventure games and with today's v2.0 rollout supports "23 brand new old games", including many older Sierra adventure titles. Among the games that can now be played atop ScummVM 2.0 are Police Quest 4, Lighthouse, Leisure Suit Larry 6/7, King's Quest VII, Full Pipe, and many other titles.

  • ScummVM 2.0.

    Just in time for the holidays, the final release of ScummVM 2.0 is here! This version adds support for 23 brand new old games, including almost all of the 32-bit Sierra adventures...

  • ScummVM 2.0 released adding support for more classic games

    For those who enjoy the classics, you might want to check out the latest release of ScummVM which adds support for more classic titles.

    When it comes to the games, they've added support for 23 more titles like King's Quest VII, King's Questions, Leisure Suit Larry 6 (hi-res), Leisure Suit Larry 7, Riven: The Sequel to Myst and more. It's a rather impressive list, but of course the 2.0 release doesn't stop at adding support for more titles.

New GNU/Linux Releases: TheSSS 23.2, Manjaro 17.1 Release Candidate, Parrot 3.9

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • The Smallest Server Suite 23.3 Released

    The Smallest Server Suite -- also known as TheSSS -- remains a live CD/DVD capable Linux operating system making it trivial to deploy a range of services.

  • TheSSS 23.2 released.

    This is a minor (point) release based on the 4MLinux Server 23.2, meaning that the components of the LAMP server are now: Linux 4.9.69, Apache 2.4.29, MariaDB 10.2.11, and PHP (both 5.6.32 and 7.0.26). The following server software has also been updated: OpenSSL (1.0.2n) and Stunnel (5.44).

  • Manjaro Preview Releases: Manjaro KDE Edition (17.1-rc1)

    KDE is a feature-rich and versatile desktop environment that provides several different styles of menu to access applications. An excellent built-in interface to easily access and install new themes, widgets, etc, from the internet is also worth mentioning. While very user-friendly and certainly flashy, KDE is also quite resource heavy and noticably slower to start and use than a desktop environment such as XFCE. A 64 bit installation of Manjaro running KDE uses about 550MB of memory.

  • Manjaro 17.1 Release Candidate 1 Arrives, GNOME Session Switches To Wayland

    The official release is near for the Arch-based Manjaro 17.1 Linux distribution.

    Manjaro 17.1 "Hakoila" is the version that's been in development since the Manjaro 17.0 release in March. Besides many updated packages from Arch in this time, the GNOME edition of Manjaro 17.1 has switched to using Wayland by default over X11.

  • “Ethical Hacking” Linux Distro Parrot 3.10 Released With New Features — Get It Here

    About 1.5 months after the release of Parrot 3.9 “Intruder,” The Parrot Project has announced the release of Parrot 3.10. Parrot is often seen as the best alternative to Kali Linux, and it continues to improve its reputation by shelling out regular updates.

4 successful open source business models to consider

Filed under
OSS

When I first discovered open source, the idea of building a business around it seemed counterintuitive. However, as I grew more familiar with the movement, I realized that open source software companies were not an anomaly, rather a result of the freedoms open source offers. As GNU project founder Richard Stallman said of free software, it's "a matter of liberty, not price." Open source is, above all, about the unhindered liberty to create. In this sense, the innovation and creativity demonstrated in open source business models is a testimony to the ideals of open source.

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Linux 4.15-rc4

Filed under
Linux

So it looks like 4.15 is finally calming down, with rc4 being about
average size-wise for this time in the release process.

Of course, we not only have the holiday season coming up, we *also*
have some x86 entry and page table handling fixes pending. But that's
not for today, and not for rc4. Let's enjoy the short normal phase of
4.15 today.

The most noticeable thing to most normal users in rc4 is that we
should finally have cleaned up and fixed the suspend/resume handling.
That got first broken for some (unusual) kernel configurations due to
excessive debugging at a very inopportune time in early resume, and
when _that_ got fixed, we broke the 32-bit case. Not many developers
run 32-bit builds in real life any more, so that took a bit to even
notice.

Read more

Also:Linux 4.15-rc4 Kernel Released

Kali Linux 2017.3 hands-on: The best alternative to Raspbian for your Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Linux distributions designed for security analysis, penetration testing, and forensic analysis are all the rage these days. It seems like you can hardly swing a dead cat (or a dead computer) without hitting one.

As a dedicated Linux user I consider that to be a good thing, simply because choice is always good, and it is always good to have several groups of talented and dedicated people working on something. But as a long-time user of Kali Linux (and BackTrack before that) I honestly believe that Kali is still the best in the field, so I am always pleased when I hear there is a new Kali release.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

What Are Containers and Why Should You Care?

What are containers? Do you need them? Why? In this article, we aim to answer some of these basic questions. But, to answer these questions, we need more questions. When you start considering how containers might fit into your world, you need to ask: Where do you develop your application? Where do you test it and where is it deployed? Read more

Linux: 4.14.7, 4.9.70, 4.4.106, 3.18.88, Four stable kernels

How to Market an Open Source Project

The widely experienced and indefatigable Deirdré Straughan presented a talk at Open Source Summit NA on how to market an open source project. Deirdré currently works with open source at Amazon Web Services (AWS), although she was not representing the company at the time of her talk. Her experience also includes stints at Ericsson, Joyent, and Oracle, where she worked with cloud and open source over several years. Through it all, Deirdré said, the main mission in her career has been to “help technologies grow and thrive through a variety of marketing and community activities.” This article provides highlights of Deirdré’s talk, in which she explained common marketing approaches and why they’re important for open source projects. Read more

Bluetooth Linux Stack Gets Improvements for Bluetooth LE Joypads, Other Devices

First off, for the ShanWan PS3 joypad (a PlayStation 3 controller clone), they managed to disable the rumble motor that currently starts immediately after you plug the controller into the USB port of your Linux computer, as well as to hard-code the HID service that the joypad was supposed to offer but it didn't because it's not Bluetooth compliant. "The SHANWAN PS3 clone joypad will start its rumble motors as soon as it is plugged in via USB. As the additional USB interrupt does nothing on the original PS3 Sixaxis joypads, and makes a number of other clone joypads actually start sending data, disable that call for the SHANWAN so the rumble motors aren't started on plug," reads the kernel patch. Read more