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Monday, 20 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Canonical Apologizes for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Linux Kernel Regression, Releases Fix

The kernel security update addressed both the L1 Terminal Fault vulnerabilities, as well as two other security flaws (CVE-2018-5390 and CVE-2018-5391) discovered by Juha-Matti Tilli in Linux kernel's TCP and IP implementations, which could allow remote attackers to cause a denial of service. Unfortunately, on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) systems, users reported that the mitigations also introduced a regression in the Linux kernel packages, which could cause kernel panics for some users that booted the OS in certain desktop environments. Read more

Android Leftovers

A Fresh Look At The NVIDIA vs. Radeon Linux Performance & Perf-Per-Watt For August 2018

With NVIDIA expected to announce the Turing-based GeForce RTX 2080 series today as part of their Gamescom press conference, here is a fresh look at the current NVIDIA Linux OpenGL/Vulkan performance with several Pascal graphics cards compared to AMD Polaris and Vega offerings. Additionally, with these latest Linux drivers, the current look at the performance-per-Watt. It will be interesting to learn more about the GeForce RTX 2080 series in a short time, which will surely deliver significantly better performance and power efficiency improvements over the GeForce GTX 1000 "Pascal" hardware. But for a current look at how those cards are running under Linux, this morning are benchmarks for the GeForce GTX 1060, GTX 1070 Ti, GTX 1080, and GTX 1080 Ti while using the latest NVIDIA 396.51 graphics driver. For the competition on the AMD side was the Radeon RX Vega 64 and RX 580 (the GTX 1060 / RX 580 included in this article for a more mature look at the Linux driver support, namely for the AMDGPU+RADV/RadeonSI side). The Radeon tests were done with the latest Linux 4.18 AMDGPU DRM state and using Mesa 18.3-dev from the Oibaf PPA as of 19 August. Read more

Latest Deepin Linux Release Promises to Consume Less Memory Than Ubuntu, Windows

Coming just two months after the Deepin 15.6 release that introduced new Light and Dark themes, Deepin 15.7 is now available with a focus on performance. It smaller ISO size by removing unnecessary components and optimizing the core system structure, better power optimization for laptops for up to 20 percent battery life, and improved memory usage. "Deepin 15.7 has made a series of adjustments and optimizations in memory usage. In the standard configuration, the boot memory has decreased from 1.1G to 830M, and reduced to less than 800M on a discrete graphics card," wrote the devs in today's announcement, where they compared the memory consumptions of Deepin 15.7, Deepin 15.6 and other operating systems on the same computer. Read more

KDE: Akademy 2018, Chakra GNU/Linux, and Krita Interview with Margarita Gadrat

Filed under
KDE
  • Akademy 2018

    The time for Akademy came this year as well, this year it was in the gorgeous Vienna, Austria.
    This year marks my 10th Akademy in a row, starting from my first one in Belgium in 2008.

Kernel: Linux 4.19, 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference and More

Filed under
Linux
  • Icelake LPSS, ChromeOS EC CEC Driver On Way To Linux 4.19 Kernel

    The Linux "multi-function device" code updates were sent in overnight for the 4.19 kernel merge window with a few interesting additions.

    Worth pointing out in the MFD subsystem for the Linux 4.19 kernel includes:

    - The ChromeOS EC CEC driver being added. Google's embedded controller for ChromeOS devices is able to expose an HDMI CEC (Consumer Electronics Control) bus for interacting with HDMI-connected devices for controlling them via supported commands. The Linux kernel's HDMI CEC support has got into shape the past few kernel cycles and now the ChromeOS EC support can expose its HDMI CEC abilities with this new driver.

  • Testing and Fuzzing Microconference Accepted into 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference

    Testing, fuzzing, and other diagnostics have greatly increased the robustness of the Linux ecosystem, but embarrassing bugs still escape to end users. Furthermore, a million-year bug would happen several tens of times per day across Linux’s installed base (said to number more than 20 billion), so the best we can possibly do is hardly good enough.

  • Latest Linux 4.19 Code Merge Introduces ChromeOS EC CEC Drivers and Cirrus Logic Detection

    Some interesting code updates were just recently put into the Linux 4.19 kernel merge window regarding “multi-function device” capabilities – mostly, this includes several new drivers and driver support, but perhaps most interesting is the ChromeOS EC CEC driver being added.

    Google’s embedded controller for ChromeOS has been able to expose an HDMI CEC (Consumer Electronics Control) bus for interacting with HDMI-connected devices, which in turn is able to control them via supported commands. So now Linux kernel’s HDMI CEC support has been improved over the past few kernel cycles until now, which means that the ChromeOS EC support will be able to expose the HDMI CEC abilities utilizing the new driver added in this merge window.

  • Linux 4.19 Had A Very Exciting First Week Of New Features

    The Linux 4.19 kernel merge window opened one week ago and there's been a lot of new features and improvements to be merged during this front-half of the merge period. If you are behind on your Phoronix reading, here's a look at the highlights for week one.

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Canonical Apologizes for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Linux Kernel Regression, Releases Fix

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

The kernel security update addressed both the L1 Terminal Fault vulnerabilities, as well as two other security flaws (CVE-2018-5390 and CVE-2018-5391) discovered by Juha-Matti Tilli in Linux kernel's TCP and IP implementations, which could allow remote attackers to cause a denial of service.

Unfortunately, on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) systems, users reported that the mitigations also introduced a regression in the Linux kernel packages, which could cause kernel panics for some users that booted the OS in certain desktop environments.

Read more

A Fresh Look At The NVIDIA vs. Radeon Linux Performance & Perf-Per-Watt For August 2018

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With NVIDIA expected to announce the Turing-based GeForce RTX 2080 series today as part of their Gamescom press conference, here is a fresh look at the current NVIDIA Linux OpenGL/Vulkan performance with several Pascal graphics cards compared to AMD Polaris and Vega offerings. Additionally, with these latest Linux drivers, the current look at the performance-per-Watt.

It will be interesting to learn more about the GeForce RTX 2080 series in a short time, which will surely deliver significantly better performance and power efficiency improvements over the GeForce GTX 1000 "Pascal" hardware. But for a current look at how those cards are running under Linux, this morning are benchmarks for the GeForce GTX 1060, GTX 1070 Ti, GTX 1080, and GTX 1080 Ti while using the latest NVIDIA 396.51 graphics driver. For the competition on the AMD side was the Radeon RX Vega 64 and RX 580 (the GTX 1060 / RX 580 included in this article for a more mature look at the Linux driver support, namely for the AMDGPU+RADV/RadeonSI side). The Radeon tests were done with the latest Linux 4.18 AMDGPU DRM state and using Mesa 18.3-dev from the Oibaf PPA as of 19 August.

Read more

Latest Deepin Linux Release Promises to Consume Less Memory Than Ubuntu, Windows

Filed under
Linux

Coming just two months after the Deepin 15.6 release that introduced new Light and Dark themes, Deepin 15.7 is now available with a focus on performance. It smaller ISO size by removing unnecessary components and optimizing the core system structure, better power optimization for laptops for up to 20 percent battery life, and improved memory usage.

"Deepin 15.7 has made a series of adjustments and optimizations in memory usage. In the standard configuration, the boot memory has decreased from 1.1G to 830M, and reduced to less than 800M on a discrete graphics card," wrote the devs in today's announcement, where they compared the memory consumptions of Deepin 15.7, Deepin 15.6 and other operating systems on the same computer.

Read more

Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Daily Lives Now Ship with Yaru Theme by Default

Filed under
Ubuntu

We've been waiting for this moment for a couple of weeks now and we're proud to be the first to report that the Yaru theme developed by various members of the Ubuntu Linux community has now finally been enabled by default in the daily builds of the Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) operating system.

Of course, we immediately took a screenshot tour of the Yaru theme on today's Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) daily build so we can show you how great it looks. We think it's a professional theme that matures Ubuntu to the next level, and it is definitely a step in the right direction for the look and feel of the Ubuntu Desktop.

Read more

The Performance Hit For A Xeon-Backed Ubuntu Linux VM With L1TF / Foreshadow Patches

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week L1 Terminal Fault (a.k.a. L1TF and Foreshadow) was made public as the latest set of speculative execution vulnerabilities affecting Intel processors. This Meltdown-like issue was met by same-day Linux kernel patches for mitigating the problem and does introduce another performance penalty but in this case is at least only limited to virtual machines. Last week I posted some initial L1TF-mitigated KVM-based VM benchmark results using a Core i7 CPU but the results for sharing today are using a much more powerful dual Xeon server.

For getting a better idea of the performance impact of mitigating L1TF/Foreshadow vulnerabilities I tested the Ubuntu patched kernel in a variety of configurations. First was the unmitigated Ubuntu 18.04 kernel, then Ubuntu 18.04 with the default out-of-the-box mitigation on the host and guest kernels, then having the host booted with the kernel parameter to force an L1D cache flush on every VMENTER rather than the default behavior of the conditional flushing, and then again when booting with l1tf=full for the full mitigation, which in the process also disables SMT/HT support.

Read more

Blueberry Pi DIY hacker board taps Allwinner V3

Filed under
Linux

Marcel Thürmer has posted schematics for building a two-layer, Linux-ready “Blueberry Pi” SBC with a solderable, Cortex-A7 Allwinner V3 with 64MB RAM, plus WiFi/BT, Ethernet, USB, RGB, MIPI-CSI, and a 26-pin RPi header.

Hardware developer Marcel Thürmer has gone to Hackaday to announce the release of open schematics for DIYers to build a Linux hacker board called the Blueberry Pi . The open-spec SBC project, which was further revealed on Hackster.io, eases the path for hobbyists by using a simple 2-layer design — compared to 6x layers on the Raspberry Pi — and by incorporating a highly integrated Allwinner V3 SoC.

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Release 1.0.0 of Flatpak

Filed under
Red Hat
Software
  • Release 1.0.0

    Flatpak 1.0 is the first version in a new stable release series. This
    new 1.x series is the successor to the 0.10.x series, which was first
    introduced in October 2017. 1.0 is the new standard Flatpak version,
    and distributions are recommended to update to it as soon as possible.

    The following release notes describe the major changes since
    0.10.0. For a complete overview of Flatpak, please see
    docs.flatpak.org.

  • Linux Application Sandboxing And Distribution Framework Flatpak Reaches Version 1.0 Stable

    Flatpak, the Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, has reached version 1.0 stable. Compared to the previous stable series (0.10.x), the new version should have faster installation and updates, it allows marking applications as end-of-life, and it asks the user to confirm app permissions at install time, among other improvements.

    Flatpak is a software utility for software deployment, package management, and application virtualization for Linux. Applications built with Flatpak can run on almost any Linux distribution. Flatpak applications run in a sandbox environment in which the applications are isolated from the rest of the system, and require permission from the user to access the user's files or access hardware devices.

  • Flatpak Linux App Sandboxing Hits 1.0 Milestone After Three Years in Development

    The Flatpak Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, formerly XDG-App, used for building and distributing conternized apps on Linux desktops, has hit today the 1.0 milestone.

    After being in development for more than three years, the widely-used Flatpak Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework has finally reached the 1.0 version, which means that it's mature enough to be deployed and used in production environments for distributing and running Linux apps.

    "Flatpak 1.0 is the first version in a new stable release series. This new 1.x series is the successor to the 0.10.x series, which was first introduced in October 2017. 1.0 is the new standard Flatpak version, and distributions are recommended to update to it as soon as possible," said developer Alexander Larsson.

  • Flatpak 1.0 Released For Delivering The Best Linux App Sandboxing

15 GNU/Linux Popular Apps in AppImage

Filed under
Software

Here's popular applications on GNU/Linux available in AppImage format in August 2018. They are LibreOffice, Krita, Kdenlive, OpenShot, Synfig Studio, Inkscape, GIMP, VLC, Emacs, and some more. I list here either they are official (built by original project) or unofficial (built by individual contributor). If you see the name probono below, he is Simon Peter, the founding father of AppImage technology. You can run these AppImages on your GNU/Linux distros (or even test them on LiveCD session). Finally, by publishing this, I hope all the original developers insterested to provide AppImage versions officially. Enjoy!

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How to Install, Change, Autostart Screensaver in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Screensavers are beautiful for desktops and should be available to everyone as part of their preferred OS. However, if you are Ubuntu user, you might be noticing a blank screen for screensaver. This is because, in recent past, post GNOME 3, the developers decided to drop the screensaver and keep a blank screen. This basic guide would help you to install, change and autostart screensavers in Ubuntu.

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First time with Linux: 30 installation tales

The Linux kernel turns another year older on Saturday, August 25. Twenty-six years ago it may have felt to the creator and BDFL Linus Torvalds that Linux would only amount to satisfying the needs of one. But today we know it has changed the lives of many.

To celebrate, thirty of our readers share what their first Linux distro and installation was like. Some of their stories are magical, some maniacal. And, it's no surprise that the tension and passion of these Linux lovers is palpable.

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Keeping patient data safe with open source tools

Filed under
OSS

Healthcare is experiencing a revolution. In a tightly regulated and ancient industry, the use of free and open source software make it uniquely positioned to see a great deal of progress.

I work at a scrappy healthcare startup where cost savings are a top priority. Our primary challenge is how to safely and efficiently manage personally identifying information (PII), like names, addresses, insurance information, etc., and personal health information (PHI), like the reason for a recent clinical visit, under the regulations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, HIPAA, which became mandatory in the United States in 2003.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Indian Bank Hit in $13.5M Cyberheist After FBI ATM Cashout Warning

    But according to Indian news outlet Dailypionneer.com, there was a second attack carried out on August 13, when the Cosmos Bank hackers transferred nearly $2 million to the account of ALM Trading Limited at Hang Seng Bank in Hong Kong.

  • How to Protect Yourself Against a SIM Swap Attack

    A sobering caveat: If a skilled SIM hijacker targets you, there’s realistically not much you can do to stop them, says Allison Nixon, threat research at security firm Flashpoint. “In most of the cases that we’ve seen, a sufficiently determined attacker can take over someone’s online footprint,” she says.

    That’s because ultimately, the machinations behind SIM swaps are largely out of your control. [...]

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 110 - Review of Black Hat, Defcon, and the effect of security policies

    Josh and Kurt talk about Black Hat and Defcon and how unexciting they have become. What happened with hotels at Defcon, and more importantly how many security policies have 2nd and 3rd level effects we often can't foresee. We end with important information about pizza, bananas, and can openers.

YunoHost 3.0.0.1

Filed under
Reviews

At this point I have only set up YunoHost, created a few user accounts and installed a handful of applications. While I may play with it further, my main focus going into this trial was how well the framework of the distribution functions. That is: is it easy to install, how hard is it for new users to add services and accounts, and is it straight forward to keep the system up to date? Basically, I wanted to know whether I could give this distribution to someone who wanted to set up home-based network services for the first time and expect them to be able to use it. Based on my experiences so far with YunoHost, my answer is: probably.

The distribution does make it pretty easy to create user accounts and install web-based services. In fact, YunoHost does this quite well. The admin panel is very streamlined, uncluttered and easy to navigate and getting something like a game of Hextris or a media streaming service installed is about as easy as a few mouse clicks. Managing the firewall, monitoring the system and creating backups are nearly as easy. The administrator still needs to figure out how to get backup archives off the disk to another location for safe keeping, but the bulk of the work in backing up and restoring the operating system is done for us.

Where I feel the distribution runs into trouble is mostly little details, and a few general concepts. For example, asking the user to create an "admin" password but leaving the root password as the default is both likely to confuse people and leave a permanent security hole on the servers of most inexperienced hobbyist administrators. On the topic of accounts, it makes sense, from a security standpoint, to separate web accounts from system accounts. But, this means there may be some confusion as to why, once an account has been created, it cannot log into the system. Little concepts like this may throw new users and I don't feel these issues are well addressed by the documentation.

The first time through, the system installer failed during the partitioning section. It worked the second time though with the same settings, so I'm not sure if this is a semi-persistent bug or a one-time error with my system.

On the whole, YunoHost performs well. It's light on resources, it offers a lot of common network services home administrators will probably want and it is pretty easy to run and maintain. There are a few little wrinkles in the experience, but in general I found the distribution to be straight forward to use. For people looking to set up a home server, this is probably a good platform on which to build.

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Software: GIMP, Password Safe, and Podcasts

Filed under
Software
  • GIMP 2.10.6 Introduces Vertical Text, New Filters, and GIMP Extension Public Repo

    A brand-new point release for popular photo editing software GIMP has been released today, bringing GIMP to version 2.10.6 – this update doesn’t bring a whole load of significant features, but there are some great improvements and new functionalities.

    For starters, GIMP 2.10.6 finally introduces support for vertical text (top to bottom), which has been a highly requested feature particularly for East-Asian writing systems. Thus, users can now set text in mixed orientation (as is typical in East-Asian vertical writing) or upright orientation (more common for Western vertical writing), with right-to-left, as well as left-to-right columns.

  • Password Safe is a KeePass-Compatible Password Manager for Linux

    Password Safe is an open-source KeePass-compatible password manager for Linux, designed specifically for use on the GNOME desktop.

  • Linux users finally get a decent podcasts app called, well, ‘Podcasts’

    Podcasts are a hugely popular form of “infotainment” these days, with almost any and every niche you can think of catered for with a show or a segment. If you’re not enjoying the wealth of podcasts out there, you’re really missing out. Podcasts provide you with the experience of a radio show, covering a wide range of topics ranging from gospel to science fiction to music and every thing in between. There are so many ways to enjoy your podcst. On mobile, popular apps such as PocketCast offer users a one-stop-shop for all the podcasts you can listen to. Many music streaming services like Apple Music and Spotify offer dedicated sections on Podcasts.

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