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Sunday, 21 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Intel Graphics On Ubuntu: GNOME vs. KDE vs. Xfce vs. Unity vs. LXDE

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering how the Intel (U)HD Graphics compare for games and other graphical benchmarks between desktop environments in 2018, here are some fresh benchmarks using GNOME Shell on X.Org/Wayland, KDE Plasma 5, Xfce, Unity 7, and LXDE.

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Linux Kernel 4.15 Delayed Until Next Week as Linus Torvalds Announces Ninth RC

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Linux

It's not every day that you see a ninth Release Candidate in the development cycle of a new Linux kernel branch, but here we go, and we can only blame it on those pesky Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that affect us all, putting billions of devices at risk of attacks.

That, and the fact that things haven't calmed down since last week's eight Release Candidate, which was supposed to be the last for the upcoming series. According to Linus Torvalds, there are still has some networking fixes pending, and there's also a very subtle boot bug that was discovered the other day.

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Also: Linux 4.15 Goes Further Into Overtime: Linux 4.15-rc9

Review: Ubuntu MATE 17.10

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE 17.10 is a solid release with a few minor caveats about the Mutiny layout. The Traditional MATE layout is very nice, but Mutiny still needs some work. For users who want the classic GNOME 2 look-and-feel, Ubuntu MATE is an excellent choice. However, Unity users looking for a Unity-like experience should still give Ubuntu MATE with the Mutiny layout a try, but need to be aware that it does have some issues and it won't work exactly like Unity. The Contemporary layout is also an option for Unity users, but is even further removed from the Unity experience than Mutiny is.

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Our Favourite Apps for Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

We enjoy using Ubuntu mainly for gaming, writing, listening to music and browsing the web. (Lots and lots of browsing the web.) There are other apps that we would love to have on Ubuntu like Affinity Photo, a stunning image editor that’s on par with Adobe’s Photoshop that’s available on Windows and Mac as well as Bear, a beautifully designed note taking app that we do most of our writing on that’s only available for macOS.

However, the Ubuntu platform has moved forward in leaps and bounds in recent years when it comes to the official availability of popular apps and we are confident that this trend will continue.

What’s your favourite Ubuntu apps?

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Kernel Space: Plans for Linux 4.16, 4.15 Likely Out Shortly

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Linux

Some FreeBSD Users Are Still Running Into Random Lock-Ups With Ryzen

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BSD

While Linux has been playing happily with Ryzen CPUs as long as you weren't affected by the performance marginality problem where you had to swap out for a newer CPU (and Threadripper and EPYC CPUs have been running splendid in all of my testing with not having any worries), it seems the BSDs (at least FreeBSD) are still having some quirks to address.

This week on the FreeBSD mailing list has been another thread about Ryzen issues on FreeBSD. Some users are still encountering random lockups that do not correspond to any apparent load/activity on the system.

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PC desktop build, Intel, spectre issues etc.

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Hardware
Security

Apart from the initial system bought, most of my systems when being changed were in the INR 20-25k/- budget including all and any accessories I bought later.

The only real expensive parts I purchased have been external hdd ( 1 TB WD passport) and then a Viewsonic 17″ LCD which together sent me back by around INR 10k/- but both seem to give me adequate performance (both have outlived the warranty years) with the monitor being used almost 24×7 over 6 years or so, of course over GNU/Linux specifically Debian. Both have been extremely well value for the money.

As I had been exposed to both the motherboards I had been following those and other motherboards as well. What was and has been interesting to observe what Asus did later was to focus more on the high-end gaming market while Gigabyte continued to dilute it energy both in the mid and high-end motherboards.

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Intel OpenGL vs. Vulkan Performance With Mesa 18.0

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the very strong Vulkan vs. OpenGL performance in the recent low-end/older Linux gaming GPU tests with discrete graphics cards, I was curious to run some benchmarks seeing the current state of Intel's open-source OpenGL vs. Vulkan performance. With the Mesa 18.0 release to be branched soon, it was a good time seeing how the Intel i965 OpenGL and ANV Vulkan drivers compare.

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How To Install Themes Or Icons In Elementary OS

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Linux

After installing Elementary OS, you may feel that you want to customize it to look more than Out-of-the-box system, and more of a personalized Operating system per se. It's very easy to install themes and icons for your Elementary OS. The process is pretty much the same as installing icons and themes in any ubuntu system since it is built upon Ubuntu.

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How To Create Virtual Hosts On Apache Server To Host Multiple Websites

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Linux

If you have apache installed, you probably know what localhost is. Localhost allows a single website to be hosted locally. However, when using virtual hosts, you can host multiple websites on the single server. The process is fairly simple and I will demonstrate it here itself.

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Android Users: To Avoid Malware, Try the F-Droid App Store

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Android
OSS

In the early days of Android, co-founder Andy Rubin set the stage for the fledgling mobile operating system. Android’s mission was to create smarter mobile devices, ones that were more aware of their owner’s behavior and location.“If people are smart,” Rubin told Business Week in 2003, “that information starts getting aggregated into consumer products.” A decade and a half later, that goal has become a reality: Android-powered gadgets are in the hands of billions and are loaded with software shipped by Google, the world’s largest ad broker.Android Users: To Avoid Malware, Try the F-Droid App Store

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LibreELEC (Krypton) 8.2.3 MR

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Movies

LibreELEC 8.2.3 is released to change our embedded pastebin provider from sprunge.us (RIP) to ix.io (working) so users can continue to submit logs to the forums through a URL without copy/pasting text or direct uploading log files. This is our preferred way to receive and read your log files so if you are not familiar with using the paste function please read this wiki article to find out how. The 8.2.3 release also solves an issue with continuity errors on USB DVB adaptors that has been troubling some 8.2 users for some time; kudos to user @jahutchi for tracking down the problem kernel commit. We also address a long-running crashing issue with Intel BayTrail hardware that needed some users to force max_cstate in kernel boot parameters, and for bonus credit users with an Intel NUC equipped with an LED can fiddle with the colours, as we backported the LED driver from our master branch.

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Linux 4.15 Expected To Be Released Today, But It Might Be 4.15-rc9

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Linux

After going through release candidates the past eight weeks, the Linux 4.15 kernel is expected to be released later today by Linus Torvalds.

Normally after RC7, the kernel is baked, but all the changes last week due to the fallout from Spectre/Meltdown led to RC8. But this past week, the pace of change has continued with many fixes still coming in. We'll likely see Linux 4.15.0 out today as Torvalds commented last week, but it wouldn't really be surprising if overtime is extended and instead we get 4.15-rc9 due to all of the changes this week and ongoing work still happening around Spectre and Meltdown mitigation.

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Leftovers: Audiocasts, Linux Graphics, and OnePlus Breach (JS)

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Misc

FOSS in Cambodia, Open Source HIT Project

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OSS
  • Open source casino tech biz TGG enters Cambodia

    The firm provides “all essential source codes with open API [application program interface] for game designers to create customisable premium content for casino operators, enabling the operators to focus on making the best possible gaming experience for their players worldwide without additional investment in information technology infrastructure,” added its release.

  • Global Open Source HIT Project Gets $1M Donation From Cryptocurrency Philanthropy

    OpenMRS, Inc., an open source medical records platform used in developing countries, has received a $1 million donation from the Pineapple Fund, an $86 million cryptocurrency philanthropy created by an anonymous donor known only as “Pine.”

Debian and Ubuntu: TLCockpit, Google, ROS and Ubuntu Core

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • TLCockpit v0.8

    Today I released v0.8 of TLCockpit, the GUI front-end for the TeX Live Manager tlmgr. I spent the winter holidays in updating and polishing, but also in helping me debug problems that users have reported. Hopefully the new version works better for all.

  • Google's Linux workstations are switching from Ubuntu to Debian

    Like many companies, Google uses a variety of operating systems in-house. macOS and Windows are used by a large number of employees, a modified build of Debian Linux is used on its servers (as of 2014, at least), and Chrome OS and Android devices are commonplace. In work environments where Linux is needed, Google uses a customized version of Ubuntu 14.04 called 'Goobuntu,' which has never been released publicly.

  • Your first robot: Introduction to the Robot Operating System [2/5]

    This is the second blog post in this series about creating your first robot with ROS and Ubuntu Core. In the previous post we walked through all the hardware necessary to follow this series, and introduced Ubuntu Core, the operating system for IoT devices. We installed it on our Raspberry Pi, and used it to go through the CamJam worksheets. In this post, I’m going to introduce you to the Robot Operating System (ROS), and we’ll use it to move our robot.

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Software: MapSCII, Notelab, Pageclip, Wine

Filed under
Software
  • MapSCII – The World Map In Your Terminal

    I just stumbled upon an interesting utility. The World map in the Terminal! Yes, It is so cool. Say hello to MapSCII, a Braille and ASCII world map renderer for your xterm-compatible terminals. It supports GNU/Linux, Mac OS, and Windows. I thought it is a just another project hosted on GitHub. But I was wrong! It is really impressive what they did there. We can use our mouse pointer to drag and zoom in and out a location anywhere in the world map.

  • Notelab – A Digital Note Taking App for Linux

    This post is on an app that brings the power of digital note-taking to PC users across the platform spectrum. If note-taking with a stylus then you would like this one, and in fact, I couldn’t have given Notelab (an open source Java-based application,) a better introduction. The team of creatives has done a good job already.

  • Pageclip – A Server for Your HTML Forms

    Data collection is important to statisticians who need to analyze the data and deduce useful information; developers who need to get feedback from users on how enjoyable their products are to use; teachers who need to carry out census of students and whatever complaints they have, etc. The list goes on.

    Seeing how convenient it can be to use services that are cloud-based wouldn’t it be nice if you could collect form data in the cloud as easily as creating a new HTML document? Well, Pageclip has come to the rescue.

  • Wine 3.0 Release Lets You Run Windows Applications on Linux More Effectively

    The Wine team has announced the release of Wine 3.0. This comes after one year of development and comes with 6000 individual changes with a number of improvements and new features. ‘This release represents a year of development effort and over 6,000 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements’.

    The free and open source compatibility layer, Wine lets you run Windows applications on Linux and macOS.

    The Wine 3.0 release has as major highlights Direct3D 10 and 11 changes, Direct3D command stream, graphics driver for Android and improved support for DirectWrite and Direct2D.

today's howtos

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HowTos
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More in Tux Machines

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Intel Graphics On Ubuntu: GNOME vs. KDE vs. Xfce vs. Unity vs. LXDE Rianne Schestowitz 22/01/2018 - 1:32am
Story Linux Kernel 4.15 Delayed Until Next Week as Linus Torvalds Announces Ninth RC Rianne Schestowitz 22/01/2018 - 1:30am
Story Review: Ubuntu MATE 17.10 Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2018 - 12:48am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2018 - 12:04am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/01/2018 - 7:42pm
Story Our Favourite Apps for Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 21/01/2018 - 7:38pm
Story Kernel Space: Plans for Linux 4.16, 4.15 Likely Out Shortly Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2018 - 7:10pm
Story Some FreeBSD Users Are Still Running Into Random Lock-Ups With Ryzen Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2018 - 7:09pm
Story PC desktop build, Intel, spectre issues etc. Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2018 - 7:00pm
Story Intel OpenGL vs. Vulkan Performance With Mesa 18.0 Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2018 - 6:50pm