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Announcing the release of Fedora 29 Beta

Filed under
Red Hat

The Fedora Project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of Fedora 29 Beta, the next big step on our journey to the exciting Fedora 29 release.

Download the prerelease from our Get Fedora site:

Get Fedora 29 Beta Workstation
Get Fedora 29 Beta Server
Get Fedora 29 Beta Atomic
Get Fedora 29 Beta Silverblue

Or, check out one of our popular variants, including KDE Plasma, Xfce, and other desktop environments, as well as images for ARM devices like the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3...

Read more

Also: Fedora Linux 29 beta rolls out

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Open Source Challenge: Why One Band Chose Linux To Record Their New Album
  • AMD Publishes Platform QoS Patches For Next-Gen Processors

    This afternoon AMD sent out their first Linux kernel patches for what might end up being a new feature for the "EPYC 2" / Zen 2 processors.

  • Education Ecosystem Joins Enterprise Ethereum Alliance & Linux Foundation

    Education Ecosystem, a blockchain company building the Netflix for professional development has today announced that it is joining two nonprofit organizations. Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA) the world's largest open source blockchain initiative & the Linux Foundation, an organization dedicated to building sustainable ecosystems around open source projects to accelerate technology development and industry adoption.

  • Enterprise Ethereum Alliance & Linux partners with Netflix developer, Education Ecosystem

    The world of blockchain witnessed a new event with Education Ecosystem partnering with Linux Foundation and Enterprise Ethereum Alliance. The notification released on 25th September suggests that the latter two are non-profitable firms. Linux Foundation is one of the prominent technology developers of the world, whereas, Enterprise Ethereum Alliance [EEA] is directed towards promoting applications based on Ethereum blockchain platform.

  • openSUSE Conference 2020: Call for Hosts

    The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce that it is accepting proposals for openSUSE Conference 2020. The Call for Hosts will be open until April 15, 2019.

    The openSUSE Conference Organizational Team will review the submissions with the hopes of having a decision announced about the location of oSC20 at the openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg, Germany. Community members and open-source enthusiasts are encouraged to follow the Conference How To guide on the wiki to submit a proposal on hosting the conference. The guide offers a How to Bid and How to Checklist to help with submitting a proposal.

    The proposals will need to be submitted to the openSUSE Marketing mailing list and the openSUSE Conference Organizational Team will discuss the proposals as it plans this year’s conference.

    While the openSUSE Project intends to move the conference to different worldwide locations in the future, the project has two locations (Nuremberg, Germany, and Prague, Czech Republic) to host the annual community conference if no proposals are submitted during the Call for Hosts.

  • VLC in Debian now can do bittorrent streaming

    Back in February, I got curious to see if VLC now supported Bittorrent streaming. It did not, despite the fact that the idea and code to handle such streaming had been floating around for years. I did however find a standalone plugin for VLC to do it, and half a year later I decided to wrap up the plugin and get it into Debian. I uploaded it to NEW a few days ago, and am very happy to report that it entered Debian a few hours ago, and should be available in Debian/Unstable tomorrow, and Debian/Testing in a few days.

  • macOS Mojave Privacy Bypass Flaw Allows Access to Protected Files
  • macOS Mojave Has A Security Flaw That Lets Hackers Access Your Contacts [Ed: Apple already gives all your contacts to the US government (NSA PRISM and beyond); now it'll give these to anyone...]

    A security flaw has been unearthed in macOS Mojave, Apple’s latest desktop OS update, by a well-known security researcher Patrick Wardle.

    As reported by Bleeping Computer, Wardle has discovered a bypass flaw in macOS Mojave using which hackers can gain access to contacts data from the address book with the help of an app that does not have the required permissions.

Software and Games: Hegemon, Gift of Parthax, Lutris

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • Hegemon – A Modular System Monitor Application Written In Rust

    When it comes to monitor running processes in Unix-like systems, the most commonly used applications are top and htop, which is an enhanced version of top. My personal favorite is htop. However, the developers are releasing few alternatives to these applications every now and then. One such alternative to top and htop utilities is Hegemon. It is a modular system monitor application written using Rust programming language.

  • Wizard arena-fighter 'Gift of Parthax' is now officially out on Linux

    Announced yesterday after a pretty short beta period, the magical arena fighting game Gift of Parthax is now officially available for Linux. Along with putting the Linux build out in public, their latest release also fixes a few bugs.

    The developer sent over a key and I've been testing it, the Linux version seems to be working really quite nicely. If you liked the idea of Wizard of Legend, but found it a little too fast for your tastes then Gift of Parthax might be a better fit although it's single-player only.

  • Lutris 0.4.20 is now out, to help you manage all your games plus some Overwatch testing

    I have to admit, the game manager Lutris [Official Site] has come along quite a bit since I last used it. Today, version 0.4.20 was made available.

    For those not aware of it, Lutris is an application that aims to give you a single place to manage all your games on Linux. It supports native games, Wine, various emulators and so on. The application itself is available under the GPL and the helper scripts to install games can be viewed before using them so it's quite nice.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Editor's Corner—Open source is not 'one size fits all' [Ed: But that's a plus, not a minus. With proprietary software it's one unsuitable thing for everything; doesn't scale.]

    Open source communities are no doubt playing a key role in moving the telecommunications industry forward, but not everyone is on board the bandwagon.

    Over the past five months or so, we've spent a fair amount of time writing about open source groups and standards development organizations (SDOs) such as the Linux Foundation, MEF, Open Networking Foundation, OpenDaylight, the TM Forum and ETSI, and there's clearly more cooperation afoot for the good of the industry.

    But artificial intelligence startup B.Yond's chief marketing officer, Rikard Kjellberg, said his company has to be careful when it comes to choosing which open source community to commit its resources to. Kjellberg spoke to FierceTelecom on the heels of the AT&T Spark conference earlier this month.

  • Collabora Had Another Stellar Year For Open-Source Consulting

    The Collabora open-source consulting firm whose expertise spans from the Linux kernel to LibreOffice and X.Org had another successful year. The UK-based company last week reported their 2017 financial position last week providing a glimpse at the viability of open-source / free software consulting.

  • Daniel Stenberg: The Polhem prize, one year later

    Family and friends have gotten a rudimentary level of understanding of what curl is and what it does. I'm not suggesting they fully grasp it or know what an "internet protocol" is now, but at least a lot of people understand that it works with "internet transfers". It's not like people were totally uninterested before, but when I was given this prize - by a jury of engineers no less - that says this is a significant invention and accomplishment with a value that "can not be overestimated", it made them more interested. The little video that was produced helped:

  • Open Source Voice Assistant, Mycroft AI, Named Top Deal By KingsCrowd
  • Service providers increasingly adopt open source for their networks

    Communications service providers (CSPs) are increasingly keen to adopt open source technologies to deliver their services, according to research.

    At this week’s Open Networking Summit Europe in Amsterdam, delegates heard that DevOps, automation, cloud, big data and analytics, software-defined networking (SDN), and management and orchestration (MANO) were increasingly being supported by open source solutions.

    Commissioned research questioned 150 CSP representatives across 98 companies worldwide. It found that 98% of CSPs are “confident” that open networking solutions can achieve the same level of performance as traditional networking solutions.

  • Communications Service Providers Overwhelmingly Confident in Open Source Networking Solutions, Survey Finds
  • WLinux Distro for Windows Subsystem for Linux Now Available, openSUSE Call for Hosts, New Firefox Bug, Firefox Collecting Telemetry Data and Creative Commons Releases Significant CC Search Update

    In other Firefox news, the browser evidently is collecting telemetry data via hidden add-ons, ITWire reports. The ITWire post also quotes Mozilla's Marshall Eriwn, director of Trust and Security: "...we will measure Telemetry Coverage, which is the percentage of all Firefox users who report telemetry. The Telemetry Coverage measurement will sample a portion of all Firefox clients and report whether telemetry is enabled. This measurement will not include a client identifier and will not be associated with our standard telemetry."

  • This “Netflix For Open Source” Startup Helps Programmers Get Paid

    Open source developers, especially those who work on lesser known projects, do not get much attention or money for the work they do. While some developers are paid to work on open source projects as a part of their day jobs, they can get overwhelmed by the amount of work these projects require.

  • Portable Computing Language 1.2 Released For OpenCL On CPUs & More

    The Portable Computing Language (a.k.a. POCL or PortableCL) is the effort for getting OpenCL running on CPUs as well as other hardware for this open-source code-base that supports OpenCL 1.2 with some OpenCL 2.0+ functionality.

    The main "feature" of POCL 1.2 is support for LLVM Clang 7.0 as previously the support was limited to LLVM 6.0, but now this new version of LLVM is supported. The HWLOC 2.0 library is also now supported. There are also some minor feature additions like device-side printf being supported.

  • Robert O'Callahan: More Realistic Goals For C++ Lifetimes 1.0

    Over two years ago I wrote about the C++ Lifetimes proposal and some of my concerns about it. Just recently, version 1.0 was released with a blog post by Herb Sutter.

    Comparing the two versions shows many important changes. The new version is much clearer and more worked-out, but there are also significant material changes. In particular the goal has changed dramatically.

Fedora and Red Hat News: Test Day, Fedora 29 Beta, Istio, Java and Microsoft Blobs

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Test Day: Java 8,10,11

    Test Day will focus on OpenJDK 11 and OpenJDK 10. Currently, we have java-1.8.0-openjdk as main JDK in Fedora. It accompanied java-1.7.0-openjdk as JRE for a year, and replaced it in buildroot in F21. Similarly, as did java-1.7.0-openjdk to java-1.6.0-openjdk in F16 as parallel JRE and replaced it in F17 in build root and main JDK. However, today the situation is more complicated. Oracle changed release process, see OpenJDK 11 summary and OpenJDK 10 summary, so currently, in F27 and up, you have java-1.8.0-openjdk as main JDK, java-openjdk as rolling release of STS JDK 10, and java-11-openjdk as techpreview of future LTS JDK. Javaws is provided in another package – icedtea-web

  • Fedora 29 Is On Track With A Lot Of Changes

    With Fedora 29 Beta set to ship today, here's a reminder about some of the great changes on the way with this next installment of the Fedora Linux distribution that is on track to officially release around the end of October.

    - GNOME 3.30 makes up the default desktop environment and the many improvements to the GNOME Shell / Mutter and all the contained components.

  • Red Hat weaves Istio’s Service Mesh into OpenShift

    If you were thinking that what Red Hat’s Openshift platform really needs is a service mesh, your prayers have been answered, courtesy of Istio. As long you don’t actually plan to use it in production anytime soon.

    Red Hatter Erik Jacobs said in a blog post yesterday that the firm had unleashed the first technology preview of the Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh, and that it was based on the Google, IBM and Lyft-backed Istio.

    Istio is designed to take the complexity of managing microservices architectures away from the application developer or DevOps team. Istio’s backers pitch it as taking care of load balancing and monitoring, as well handling authentication and communications between services, access and traffic control.

  • 6 personality traits driving your organization
  • Scaling Java Containers

    As enterprises increasingly adopt the advantages of deploying containerized applications, it is important to address the potential misconception that the JVM does not play nicely in the cloud. While it is true that most JVMs may not come out of the box perfectly configured to run in an elastic cloud environment, the wide variety of system properties available allows the JVM to be tuned to get the most out of a host environment. If a containerized application is deployed using Red Hat OpenShift, the application could take advantage of the Kubernetes Vertical Pod Autoscaler (VPA), which is an alpha feature. The VPA is a perfect example of where the JVM’s default memory management settings could diminish the increased resource utilization offered by such a feature. This blog post will walk through the steps of configuring and testing a containerized Java application for use with the VPA, which demonstrates the inherent adaptability of the JVM to cloud platforms.

  • A certified sequel: SQL Server on Red Hat’s cloud-native technologies [Ed: "Mike Ferris is vice president of business architecture at Red Hat." Now he's selling nonfree software (likely with back doors) from Microsoft]
  • FY2019 EPS Estimates for Red Hat Inc Raised by William Blair (RHT)
  • Enthralling Stocks: Ensco plc, (NYSE: ESV), Red Hat, Inc., (NYSE: RHT)

Taking the Audiophile Linux distro for a spin

Filed under
GNU
Linux

For a completely different experience, take a look at the Ragazze Quartet’s performance of Terry Riley’s "Four Four Three." I picked up ahigh-resolutionn version of this fascinating music from Channel Classics, which operates a Linux-friendly download store (no bloatware to install on your computer).

And finally, I was saddened to hear of the recent passing of Rachid Taha, whose wonderful blend of North African and French musical traditions, along with his frank confrontation of the challenges of being North African and living in Europe, has made some powerful—and fun—music. Check out Taha’s version of "Rock the Casbah." I have a few of his songs scattered around various compilation albums, and some time ago bought the CD version of Rachid Taha: The Definitive Collection, which I’ve been enjoying again recently.

Read more

A Quick Test Of NVIDIA's "Carmel" CPU Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

NVIDIA's Tegra Xavier SoC is becoming more widely available now that the Jetson Xavier Development Kit has begun shipping. Besides this latest SoC being an exciting design with its Volta-based GPU and having a Tensor Processing Unit / Deep Learning Accelerator, it's exciting on the CPU side as well with NVIDIA's custom-designed ARMv8 "Carmel" CPU cores.

The Tegra194 (Xavier) SoC features eight 10-wide superscalar Carmel CPU cores that are based on the ARMv8.2-A architecture and manufactured on a TSMC 12nm FinFET process.

Read more

Events: XDC 2018 Kicks Off Tomorrow In A Coruña, Linux Foundation Upcoming Events

Filed under
Linux
  • XDC 2018 Kicks Off Tomorrow In A Coruña

    Tomorrow marks the start of the annual X.Org Developers' Conference that is not only about the X11 server but also Mesa, Wayland, Linux input, and other areas of the desktop stack.

    It's set to be another interesting XDC with talks about Vulkan in Mesa, multi-GPU device selection in OpenGL, Virtual KMS, DRM GPU scheduler, continuous integration, the new Intel Iris Gallium3D driver, the state of ARB_gl_spirv for Mesa, OpenCL support via NIR/SPIR-V. HMM, and more.

  • Tune Into the Free Live Stream of Keynotes at Open Networking Summit Europe, September 25-27!
  • LF Energy Summit 2018

    At the center of the intersection between globalization, world economic activity, and human and environmental health, are the world’s power systems. LF Energy, a new initiative of The Linux Foundation, provides a neutral, collaborative environment for open source innovation to enable the “electrification of everything to scale.” Our mission is to accelerate and transform the world’s relationship with energy.

More Malware-Like Behaviour From Chrome and Firefox Introduces Firefox Monitor, Other News

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Now Chrome Doesn’t Delete “Google Cookies” Even If You Clear All Cookies

    Yet another privacy concern for Google Chrome users! Previously, we talked about Google’s auto-login mechanism which is hijacking our local Google Chrome data. Now, another Chrome 69 setting has come to light which is risking our freedom to remove data.

  • Introducing Firefox Monitor, Helping People Take Control After a Data Breach

    Data breaches, when information like your username and password are stolen from a website you use, are an unfortunate part of life on the internet today. It can be hard to keep track of when your information has been stolen, so we’re going to help by launching Firefox Monitor, a free service that notifies people when they’ve been part of a data breach. After testing this summer, the results and positive attention gave us the confidence we needed to know this was a feature we wanted to give to all of our users.

  • Firefox Monitor, take control of your data

    That sinking feeling. You’re reading the news and you learn about a data breach. Hackers have stolen names, addresses, passwords, survey responses from a service that you use. It seems like we’re having that sinking feeling more and more. But we don’t have to despair. While technology will never be impervious to attacks, we can make sure that we’re able to respond when we learn that our personal data and passwords are part of a breach.

  • Firefox Quantum, Beta and Nightly Affected by ‘Reap Firefox’ Crash Attack

    A particular vulnerability in the present Firefox browser has been unraveled by the security researcher and basically the creater of this bug, Sabri Haddouche in his blog post. He pointed towards a bug which brings the browser and also the operating system possibly with a ‘Reap Firefox’ attack crash. This vulnerability affects Firefox versions working under Linux, macOS and Windows.

  • $1.6 Million to Connect Unconnected Americans: Our NSF-WINS Grand Prize Winners

    After months of prototyping and judging, Mozilla and the National Science Foundation are fueling the best and brightest ideas for bringing more Americans online

    Today, Mozilla and the National Science Foundation (NSF) are announcing the grand prize winners in our Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (NSF-WINS) Challenges — an audacious competition to connect millions of unconnected Americans.

    The grand prize winners are as novel as they are promising: An 80-foot tower in rural Appalachia that beams broadband connectivity to residents. And, an autonomous network that fits in two suitcases — and can be deployed after earthquakes and hurricanes.

Endless OS – A Beautifully Unique Linux Distribution for Your Family

Filed under
Reviews

Endless OS is a free Linux-based Operating System that makes computers fun to use. It features a beautiful UI, a somewhat locked-down app manager, and tons of educational software.

Endless OS is mostly used to teach computing all over the world so the company has made it simulate a smartphone experience. In place of an app drawer, it uses shortcuts arranged in a grid view on the desktop. Sort of like an iPhone. You can add/delete apps from view as well as create folders for organizing them.

Read more

Wayland future and legacy

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
KDE

First I directly admit on what I did teaser for 5.14 in my last update but what will not make it: generic gamma color correction per display. There are two reasons for it. The first one is that some preliminary patches, which needed to be merged first, endured long review phases. The second reason is, that when these patches finally were accepted I had shifted my focus on some other topics, which I decided to give an higher priority.

Before delving into these other topics, a short analysis on why the reviews took so long: first there were of course some improvements possible to my patches, but after these got pointed out in the reviews I did fix them back then pretty quickly. The more striking reason is though that we are just short on people who can actually review KWin code changes, in particular with Martin being not maintainer anymore. That is not only a problem for my proposed code changes, but for anyone’s patches to KWin. And this hasn’t improved since back then. We must find a way to reduce the review pressure on the people being capable of doing reviews somehow, at best with only a minimal hit in code quality. I don’t have a full solution for this problem yet, we will see if we find a good one.

After this is out of the way, let us talk about these other features, which I prioritized higher.

Read more

Games: Release of PlayOnLinux 5.0 Alpha, Aspyr Media, Geneshift, GOG and DotLine

Filed under
Gaming
  • Release of PlayOnLinux 5.0 alpha 1

    I'm aware that it has been a while since the last time we gave news to you. Be reassured, the project is moving on and here we are to give you some news.

  • Aspyr Media have a big sale going on the Humble Store, some sweet deals to be had

    For those of you in the mood to start you week with some fun new games, Humble Store is doing an Aspyr Media sale.

  • Top-down shooter Geneshift is getting a Battle Royale mode and it sounds like a lot of fun

    Geneshift (also known as Mutant Factions or Subvein) is a top-down shooter with some seriously good action that's currently in Early Access and the developer has decided to add a Battle Royale mode.

    Initially, I thought this was a joke. However, it's very much a real thing.

  • GOG added two more Visual Novels with Linux support, Highway Blossoms and A Kiss For The Petals

    For those who love Visual Novels, you might want to know that GOG have expanded their collection a little again recently.

    The two titles are Highway Blossoms and A Kiss For The Petals - Maidens of Michael. Neither game is particularly new, although it's worth noting that A Kiss For The Petals - Maidens of Michael was removed from Steam so GOG is the easiest option to get it at the moment.

  • Challenging minimalist puzzle game 'DotLine' released with native Linux support

    DotLine from The Selenite Forge who also made Bionic Attack is a minimalist puzzle game that tries to challenge your brain, out now with native Linux support. Note: Key provided by the developer.

    The basic idea of the game is really simple. You have to guide a ball from start to end, the problem is the path it needs to take is all messed up and you've got the wonderful job of rotating everything into the correct position. What makes it challenging, is that as soon as you rotate the first piece, the ball will begin rolling and so it becomes a mad dash to get everything right. Even if you don't do anything, you only get two seconds before it starts.

Announcing Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU1

Filed under
OS
  • Announcing Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU1

    Today we're releasing the first SRU for Oracle Solaris 11.4! This is the next installment in our ongoing support train for Oracle Solaris 11 and there will be no further Oracle Solairs 11.3 SRUs delivered to the support repository. Due to the timing of our releases and some fixes being in Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU35 but not in 11.4, not all customers on Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU35 were able to update to Oracle Solaris 11.4 when it was released. SRU1 includes all these fixes and customers can now update to Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU1 via 'pkg update' from the support repository or by downloading the SRU from My Oracle Support Doc ID 2433412.1.

  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU1 Released

    It's been just under one month since Oracle's long-awaited debut of Solaris 11.4 and now its first stable release update has been issued.

    Solaris 11.4 SRU1 is mainly intended to fix some early bugs and those that didn't make the cut for getting in the initial 11.4 release. One new feature is support for "Memory Reservation Pools for Kernel Zones" to help systems with high levels of memory contention or fragmented memory by allowing memory to be reserved ahead of time.

Mozilla: Privacy, R.I.P., and Consent Management at Mozfest 2018

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox collects data on you through hidden add-ons

    Mozilla, the organisation that produces the Firefox browser and makes a loud noise about its open source credentials, is quietly collecting telemetry data on its users by the use of hidden add-ons, even though publicly visible telemetry controls are not selected.

  • R.I.P., Charles W. Moore, a fine man who liked fine Macs

    A farewell and au revoir to a great gentleman in making the most of your old Mac, Charles W. Moore, who passed away at his home in rural Canada on September 16 after a long illness. Mr Moore was an early fan of TenFourFox, even back in the old bad Firefox 4 beta days, and he really made his famous Pismo PowerBook G3 systems work hard for it.

  • Consent management at Mozfest 2018

    Good news. It looks like we're having a consent management mini-conference as part of Mozfest next month. (I'm one of the organizers for the Global Consent Manager session, and plan to attend the others.)

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More in Tux Machines

Software and Games: Hegemon, Gift of Parthax, Lutris

  • Hegemon – A Modular System Monitor Application Written In Rust
    When it comes to monitor running processes in Unix-like systems, the most commonly used applications are top and htop, which is an enhanced version of top. My personal favorite is htop. However, the developers are releasing few alternatives to these applications every now and then. One such alternative to top and htop utilities is Hegemon. It is a modular system monitor application written using Rust programming language.
  • Wizard arena-fighter 'Gift of Parthax' is now officially out on Linux
    Announced yesterday after a pretty short beta period, the magical arena fighting game Gift of Parthax is now officially available for Linux. Along with putting the Linux build out in public, their latest release also fixes a few bugs. The developer sent over a key and I've been testing it, the Linux version seems to be working really quite nicely. If you liked the idea of Wizard of Legend, but found it a little too fast for your tastes then Gift of Parthax might be a better fit although it's single-player only.
  • Lutris 0.4.20 is now out, to help you manage all your games plus some Overwatch testing
    I have to admit, the game manager Lutris [Official Site] has come along quite a bit since I last used it. Today, version 0.4.20 was made available. For those not aware of it, Lutris is an application that aims to give you a single place to manage all your games on Linux. It supports native games, Wine, various emulators and so on. The application itself is available under the GPL and the helper scripts to install games can be viewed before using them so it's quite nice.

today's howtos

OSS Leftovers

  • Editor's Corner—Open source is not 'one size fits all' [Ed: But that's a plus, not a minus. With proprietary software it's one unsuitable thing for everything; doesn't scale.]
    Open source communities are no doubt playing a key role in moving the telecommunications industry forward, but not everyone is on board the bandwagon. Over the past five months or so, we've spent a fair amount of time writing about open source groups and standards development organizations (SDOs) such as the Linux Foundation, MEF, Open Networking Foundation, OpenDaylight, the TM Forum and ETSI, and there's clearly more cooperation afoot for the good of the industry. But artificial intelligence startup B.Yond's chief marketing officer, Rikard Kjellberg, said his company has to be careful when it comes to choosing which open source community to commit its resources to. Kjellberg spoke to FierceTelecom on the heels of the AT&T Spark conference earlier this month.
  • Collabora Had Another Stellar Year For Open-Source Consulting
    The Collabora open-source consulting firm whose expertise spans from the Linux kernel to LibreOffice and X.Org had another successful year. The UK-based company last week reported their 2017 financial position last week providing a glimpse at the viability of open-source / free software consulting.
  • Daniel Stenberg: The Polhem prize, one year later
    Family and friends have gotten a rudimentary level of understanding of what curl is and what it does. I'm not suggesting they fully grasp it or know what an "internet protocol" is now, but at least a lot of people understand that it works with "internet transfers". It's not like people were totally uninterested before, but when I was given this prize - by a jury of engineers no less - that says this is a significant invention and accomplishment with a value that "can not be overestimated", it made them more interested. The little video that was produced helped:
  • Open Source Voice Assistant, Mycroft AI, Named Top Deal By KingsCrowd
  • Service providers increasingly adopt open source for their networks
    Communications service providers (CSPs) are increasingly keen to adopt open source technologies to deliver their services, according to research. At this week’s Open Networking Summit Europe in Amsterdam, delegates heard that DevOps, automation, cloud, big data and analytics, software-defined networking (SDN), and management and orchestration (MANO) were increasingly being supported by open source solutions. Commissioned research questioned 150 CSP representatives across 98 companies worldwide. It found that 98% of CSPs are “confident” that open networking solutions can achieve the same level of performance as traditional networking solutions.
  • Communications Service Providers Overwhelmingly Confident in Open Source Networking Solutions, Survey Finds
  • WLinux Distro for Windows Subsystem for Linux Now Available, openSUSE Call for Hosts, New Firefox Bug, Firefox Collecting Telemetry Data and Creative Commons Releases Significant CC Search Update
    In other Firefox news, the browser evidently is collecting telemetry data via hidden add-ons, ITWire reports. The ITWire post also quotes Mozilla's Marshall Eriwn, director of Trust and Security: "...we will measure Telemetry Coverage, which is the percentage of all Firefox users who report telemetry. The Telemetry Coverage measurement will sample a portion of all Firefox clients and report whether telemetry is enabled. This measurement will not include a client identifier and will not be associated with our standard telemetry."
  • This “Netflix For Open Source” Startup Helps Programmers Get Paid
    Open source developers, especially those who work on lesser known projects, do not get much attention or money for the work they do. While some developers are paid to work on open source projects as a part of their day jobs, they can get overwhelmed by the amount of work these projects require.
  • Portable Computing Language 1.2 Released For OpenCL On CPUs & More
    The Portable Computing Language (a.k.a. POCL or PortableCL) is the effort for getting OpenCL running on CPUs as well as other hardware for this open-source code-base that supports OpenCL 1.2 with some OpenCL 2.0+ functionality. The main "feature" of POCL 1.2 is support for LLVM Clang 7.0 as previously the support was limited to LLVM 6.0, but now this new version of LLVM is supported. The HWLOC 2.0 library is also now supported. There are also some minor feature additions like device-side printf being supported.
  • Robert O'Callahan: More Realistic Goals For C++ Lifetimes 1.0
    Over two years ago I wrote about the C++ Lifetimes proposal and some of my concerns about it. Just recently, version 1.0 was released with a blog post by Herb Sutter. Comparing the two versions shows many important changes. The new version is much clearer and more worked-out, but there are also significant material changes. In particular the goal has changed dramatically.

Money and Press for FOSS FUD firms