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Thursday, 26 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 Enters Beta with a Focus on Security and Stability

Filed under
Red Hat

In an attempt to continue to deliver upon Red Hat’s 10-year lifecycle support, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 entered beta stages of development today with a focus on improving the security and stability of the operating system, as well as to add support for the latest hardware and software components, and support the next generation of cloud-native apps.

"With a focus on stability and security features that maintain hardware, application, and management tooling compatibility, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 Beta is designed to support the next generation of cloud-native applications through an updated Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 base image," said Red Hat in today's announcement.

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Also: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 Enters Beta

GNU/Linux on Chromebooks

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
Google

Critical Live Boot Bug Fixed and Ubuntu 18.04 is Finally Released

Filed under
News

A critical bug in live boot session delayed Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release for several hours. The bug has been fixed and the ISO are available to download.
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Nintendo Switch hack + Dolphin Emulator could bring GameCube and Wii game support

Filed under
Gaming

This week security researchers released details about a vulnerability affecting NVIDIA Tegra X1 processors that makes it possible to bypass secure boot and run unverified code on some devices… including every Nintendo Switch game console that’s shipped to date.

Among other things, this opens the door for running modified versions of Nintendo’s firmware, or alternate operating systems such as a GNU/Linux distribution.

And if you can run Linux… you can also run Linux applications. Now it looks like one of those applications could be the Dolphin emulator, which lets you play Nintendo GameCube and Wii games on a computer or other supported devices.

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Openwashing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Linux Foundation: New Members, Cloud Foundry, and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit

Filed under
Linux
  • 41 Organizations Join The Linux Foundation to Support Open Source Communities With Infrastructure and Resources

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced the addition of 28 Silver members and 13 Associate members. Linux Foundation members help support development of the shared technology resources, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation. Linux Foundation member contributions help provide the infrastructure and resources that enable the world's largest open collaboration communities.

  • Cloud Foundry for Developers: Architecture

    Back in the olden days, provisioning and managing IT stacks was complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. Getting the resources to do your job could take weeks or months.

    Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) was the first major step in automating IT stacks, and introduced the self-service provisioning and configuration model. VMware and Amazon were among the largest early developers and service providers.

    Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) adds the layer to IaaS that provides application development and management.

    Cloud Foundry is for building Platform as a Service (PaaS) projects, which bundle servers, networks, storage, operating systems, middleware, databases, and development tools into scalable, centrally-managed hardware and software stacks. That is a lot of work to do manually, so it takes a lot of software to automate it.

  • Jonathan Corbet on Linux Kernel Contributions, Community, and Core Needs

    At the recent Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit, I sat down with Jonathan Corbet, the founder and editor-in-chief of LWN to discuss a wide range of topics, including the annual Linux kernel report.

    The annual Linux Kernel Development Report, released by The Linux Foundation is the evolution of work Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman had been doing independently for years. The goal of the report is to document various facets of kernel development, such as who is doing the work, what is the pace of the work, and which companies are supporting the work.

Best Linux server distro of 2018

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

As a free and open source operating system, Linux is the ideal candidate for setting up your own server. The community of developers behind each Linux distribution (distro) regularly review the source code of their chosen OS to make sure it's free of bugs.

When it comes to servers, the emphasis should obviously be on stability. While upgrades are a good thing on the face of it, they have the potential to interfere with the smooth running of your server.

We’ve highlighted some of our favourite Linux server distros in this article, including operating systems that offer long term support, stability, and ideally a fast setup process.

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Red Hat: Red Hat Women’s Leadership Community Luncheon, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 Beta, Stratis and More

Filed under
Red Hat

KDE at FOSS-North and Cutelyst 2.2.0 Release

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE at FOSS-North

    Over the weekend, while some KDE people were in Toulouse improving Akonadi, and other KDE people were in Berlin improving Plasma, I was in Goteborg at FOSS-North showing off some KDE things.

    Anyone who saw our FOSDEM booth knows the setup. We still had the same blue table (thanks, Sune) and selection of low-power ARM blinkenlights, the Pine64 and a Pinebook. I still think that “hey, Plasma runs fine on an overpowered x86 laptop” is not particularly interesting, but that “the past six months have seen serious work on reducing Plasma’s resource usage aimed specifically at this kind of device” is. Different from FOSDEM is that I could now run one of the just-released Netrunner images for the Pinebook.

  • Cutelyst 2.2.0 is out

    Thanks to the release of Virtlyst – a web manager for virtual machines, several bugs were found and fixed in Cutelyst, the most important one in this release is the WebSockets implementation that broke due the addition of HTTP/2 to cutelyst-wsgi2.

    Fixing this was quite interesting as when I fixed the issue the first time, it started to make deleteLater() calls on null objects which didn’t crash but since Qt warn’s you about that it was hurting performance. Then I fixed the deleteLater() calls and WebSockets broke again

Security: Updates, Europol/DDOS, ZTE, F-Secure

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • EU cyber cops shut down 'world's biggest' DDoS-for-hire service

    The website's servers were seized at 11.30am in the Netherlands, the US and Germany, Europol said, effectively shutting down the service that had 136,000 registered users and enabled individuals with little or no technical knowledge to launch crippling cyber-attacks across the world for just $14.99.

  • ZTE router flaw put 400,000 Hyperoptic customers at hacking [sic] risk

    But security firm Context IS discovered that the devices contained "the combination of a hardcoded root account and a DNS rebinding vulnerability", which could have allowed an "internet-based attacker to compromise all customer routers of UK ISP Hyperoptic via a malicious webpage".

  • Researchers Spent 10 Years Creating This “Master Key” To Unlock Millions Of Hotel Rooms

    A team of security researchers at F-secure have created a device running custom software that can create a master key “out of thin air.” They’ve exploited vulnerabilities in the door lock software Vision by VingCard, developed by the Swedish company Assa Abloy. Their electronic door locking system is used in millions of hotel rooms across the globe.

  • F-Secure Researchers: Master Keys to Hotels Can be Created ‘Out of Thin Air’

    F-Secure researchers have found that global hotel chains and hotels worldwide are using an electronic lock system that could be exploited by an attacker to gain access to any room in the facility. The design flaws discovered in the lock system’s software, which is known as Vision by VingCard and used to secure millions of hotel rooms worldwide, have prompted the world’s largest lock manufacturer, Assa Abloy, to issue software updates with security fixes to mitigate the issue.

  • Hackers built a 'master key' for millions of hotel rooms

    Security researchers have built a master key that exploits a design flaw in a popular and widely used hotel electronic lock system, allowing unfettered access to every room in the building.

    The electronic lock system, known as Vision by VingCard and built by Swedish lock manufacturer Assa Abloy, is used in more than 42,000 properties in 166 countries, amounting to millions of hotel rooms -- as well as garages and storage units.

Mozilla: Localization, VR, WebAssembly and More

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Localization Workshop in Kolkata (November 2017)

    Last November, Jeff, Peiying and I (flod) headed to Kolkata for the last of our planned localization workshops. The group of languages represented at the event included Bengali (both Bangladesh and India), Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Marathi, Nepali, Odia, Tamil and Telugu. If you’re surprised by the number of languages, consider that India alone has 22 languages listed in the Indian Constitution, but that’s only the tip of the iceberg, with a much larger variety of languages spoken, and sometime officially recognized at the State level.

  • Making a Web Thing on the ESP8266

    Today I’m going to walk you through creating a simple Web Thing using an inexpensive off-the-shelf ESP8266 board.

    The power of web things comes from their ability to connect the digital world of web pages with the physical world of things. We recently released the Things Framework, a collection of software intended to make it easy to create new web things. The relevant library for this example is the webthing-esp8266 library, which makes easy it to connect Arduino-programmed ESP8266 boards with the Web of Things. We hope that this lowers the barrier to creating compelling experiences with our gateway and the Web Thing API.

  • Introducing Hubs: A new way to get together

    Today, we’re excited to share a preview release of Hubs by Mozilla, a new way to get together online within Mixed Reality, right in your browser. Hubs is the first experiment we’re releasing as part of our Social Mixed Reality efforts, and we think it showcases the potential for the web to become the best, most accessible platform to bring people together around the world in this new medium.

  • Enabling Social Experiences Using Mixed Reality and the Open Web

    Today, Mozilla is sharing an early preview of an experiment we are calling “Hubs by Mozilla”. Hubs is an immersive social experience that is delivered through the browser. You simply click on a web link to begin interacting with others inside virtual reality.

  • How does dynamic dispatch work in WebAssembly?

    WebAssembly is a stack-based virtual machine and instruction set, designed such that implementations can be fast and safe. It is a portable target for the compilation of languages like C, C++, and Rust.

    [...]

    But C, C++, and Rust all have some capability for dynamic dispatch: function pointers, virtual methods, and trait objects. On native targets like x86, all these forms compile down into a jump to a dynamic address. What do these forms compile down into when targeting WebAssembly?

  • BlinkOn 9: Working on the Web Platform from a cooperative

    Last week, I attended BlinkOn 9. I was very happy to spend some time with my colleagues working on Chromium, including a new developer who will join my team next week (to be announced soon!).

    This edition had the usual format with presentations, brainstorming, lightning talks and informal chats with Chromium developers. I attended several interesting presentations on web platform standardization, implementation and testing. It was also great to talk to Googlers in order to coordinate on some of Igalia’s projects such as the collaboration with AMP or MathML in Chromium.

Games: GOG, Cities: Skylines - Parklife and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Comedy adventure game HIVESWAP: Act 1 is now on GOG

    For those who love comedy adventure games, you might want to take a look at HIVESWAP: Act 1 as it's now on GOG.

  • Cities: Skylines - Parklife now has a very short gameplay teaser

    Cities: Skylines - Parklife, the new expansion coming next month now has a rather short gameplay teaser.

    For those who didn't see the previous announcement, Parklife will further expand the city-builder from developer Colossal Order and publisher Paradox Interactive to include: amusement parks, nature reserves, city parks and zoos, and giving new life to your empty land with custom parks and gardens.

  • GOG now have the Linux version of retro-inspired FPS STRAFE: Millennium Edition

    For those of you GOG fans itching for some FPS action, you might want to check out STRAFE: Millennium Edition as GOG now have the Linux build too. Really good to see GOG add some many Linux builds lately, really pleasing to see!

    Naturally, the GOG build comes with the latest version of the game including a few of the Linux issues that came up being squashed. It's also 64bit, so no lib hunting required.

10 Great LXDE Themes

Filed under
GNU
Linux

When it comes to Linux desktop environment aesthetics, the LXDE desktop environment is probably the weakest. The default skin it comes with, to be frank, is kind of dated and bland. Not to worry! Since this desktop environment is on Linux, you can tear it apart and make it look however you’d like!

So why not make a list dedicated to great themes you can install right now into your LXDE session? I should mention, since this is LXDE, you’ll be able to use both XFCE4 themes as well as GTK2+ themes. (And the panel even has support for images if you want.)

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Tumbleweed Gets New Mesa, KDE Frameworks, GNOME Packages

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SUSE

A total of four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week that brought new updates for the Linux Kernel, Mesa and a major version update of libglvnd.

RADV received several fixes in snapshot 20180424 with the update to Mesa 18.0.1. Mesa core also had some patches to fix issues around overriding the OpenGL/ES supported version through environment variables, and a patch to fix an issue with texture samples found in “The Witness” through Wine. An updated description for the SSLProtocol option was made available with the apache2 2.4.33 package and apparmor 2.13 delivered a change of the (writeable) cache directory to /var/cache/apparmor/ with the new btrfs layout. The reason for using /var/lib/apparmor/cache/, which was “it’s part of the / subvolume”, is gone, and /var/cache makes more sense for the cache, according to the changelog. The cleanup process and behavior are a lot better with the update of ccache 3.4.2. Backup tool deja-dup 38.0 was a major update and exclude snap cache directories by default. GTK has a new ‘Widgetbowl‘ demo and the wayland backend now supports the stable xdg-shell protocol in gtk3 3.22.30. Linux Kernel 4.16.3 arrived in the snapshot and the GL Vendor-Neutral Dispatch library, libglvnd, was bumped to major version 1.0.0 thanks to EGL and GLX interfaces being defined and stable. The Tumbleweed rating tool is currently treading the snapshot as stable with an 88 rating.

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Raspberry Pi alternatives: 10 single-board computers for novice coders

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is the dinky single-board computer grabbing headlines around the world, and for good reason. Initially launched as a tool to train up amateur coders, it has since gone on to sell more than 19 million units worldwide.

[...]

If you’re weighing up your options, read on for the best Raspberry Pi 3 B+ alternatives.

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“The printer story” redux: a testimonial about the injustice of proprietary firmware

Filed under
GNU

I’ve always supported free software, but never felt the concrete importance of it until proprietary firmware threatened to cause a big problem, in terms of money, time, and environmental impact, for the company where I work. It’s a mid-sized company, employing about one thousand people. It’s highly production-oriented, and we need to print about two or three thousand paper sheets per week only for the production plans, on a special kind of paper. This number doesn’t include any reprints or further needs, so the total printed pages can be even higher.

We used to print everything with an old printer, which worked fine, but it didn't have an integrated stapler, and required a lot of human time to staple all the sheets as needed. After a production increase and the consequent increase in printing of orders, we asked for a new printer with an integrated stapler.

After some weeks of testing and a lot of work to try and make the printer handle our production orders, we faced a big problem: the printer couldn’t do what we needed. If we tried to print on the special paper, the printer printed perfectly but automatically disabled the stapler, because it’s developed to not work with a thicker sheet of paper. We would need a more complex (and expensive) stapling system. If we modified the paper settings to “normal paper,” the stapler would work fine, but the printing came out faded.

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Also: Guix welcomes Outreachy, GSoC, and Guix-HPC interns

Purism’s Librem 5 smartphone will run Ubuntu Touch, as well as PureOS

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

Purism has partnered up with UBports to offer Ubuntu Touch as a supported operating system on its Librem 5 smartphone. The crowd-sourced, open-source smartphone runs Purism’s PureOS, by default. Purism is also working with GNOME for a version of PureOS with the KDE Plasma Mobile environment, giving users a choice between three OSes.

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Core i7 8700K vs. Ryzen 7 2700X With Rise of The Tomb Raider On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Here are our latest Linux gaming benchmarks comparing the Intel Core i7 8700K to the newly-released Ryzen 7 2700X. The focus in this article is on the Rise of the Tomb Raider Linux port released last week by Feral Interactive and powered by Vulkan.

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