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today's howtos

Mozilla: Browser Wish List, Layoffs and "Web Monetization"

  • Browser Wish List - Distressful Content Filtering

    On the other hands, they are system where you can shield yourself against the website practice. For example for privacy, you may want to use something like uMatrix where you can block everything by default, and allow certain HTTP responses type for each individual URIs. This is what I do on my main browser. It requests a strong effort in tailoring each individual pages. It's a built a policy on the go. It creates general list for future sites (you may block Google Analytics for every future sites you will encounter), but still it doesn't really learn more than that on how to act on your future browsing. We could imagine applying this method to distressful content with keywords in the page. In terms of distressful content, it may dramatically fail for the same reasons that universal shields fail. They don't understand the content, they just apply a set of rules.

  • Firefox maker Mozilla axes a quarter of its workforce, blames coronavirus, vows to 'develop new revenue streams'

    Firefox maker Mozilla has axed 250 employees, or a quarter of its workforce, claiming the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic is to blame after hitting it in the wallet. The organization will also "ship new products faster and develop new revenue streams." “Economic conditions resulting from the global pandemic have significantly impacted our revenue,” Mozilla Corp CEO Mitchell Baker said in a public statement today. “As a result, our pre-COVID plan was no longer workable.” Mozilla gets the vast, vast majority of its funding from Google, Yandex, and Baidu, who pay to be the default search engine in Firefox in their regions. In 2018, Moz had a $451m cash pile, 95 per cent of which, some $430m, was provided by these web giants. Those deals will expire [PDF, p25] in November 2020 unless renewed or renegotiated.

  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: js13kGames 2020: A lean coding challenge with WebXR and Web Monetization

    Have you heard about the js13kGames competition? It’s an online code-golfing challenge for HTML5 game developers. The month-long competition has been happening annually since 2012; it runs from August 13th through September 13th. And the fun part? We set the size limit of the zip package to 13 kilobytes, and that includes all sources—from graphic assets to lines of JavaScript. For the second year in a row you will be able to participate in two special categories: WebXR and Web Monetization.

Python Programming Leftovers

  • How To Build A Simple Virtual Assistant Using Python

    Virtual assistants are everywhere from Alexa, to Google Home, to Apple Siri. They help us check the weather, make phone calls, control the thermostat, door locks, and other smart home devices e.t.c In this article, I will be walking you through how to create a simple virtual assistant using Google Speech Recognition and IBM Watson Text to Speech in Python.

  • Deep Learning in Keras - Building a Deep Learning Model

    Deep learning is one of the most interesting and promising areas of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning currently. With great advances in technology and algorithms in recent years, deep learning has opened the door to a new era of AI applications. In many of these applications, deep learning algorithms performed equal to human experts and sometimes surpassed them. Python has become the go-to language for Machine Learning and many of the most popular and powerful deep learning libraries and frameworks like TensorFlow, Keras, and PyTorch are built in Python. In this series, we'll be using Keras to perform Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA), Data Preprocessing and finally, build a Deep Learning Model and evaluate it. In this stage, we will build a deep neural-network model that we will train and then use to predict house prices.

  • Return modified string with Python

    Hello and welcome back, today I have solved another python related problem on CodeWars and would like to post the solution here. The question is as follows:- Given 2 strings, a and b, return a string of the form short+long+short, with the shorter string on the outside and the long string on the inside. The strings will not be the same length, but they may be empty ( length 0 ).

  • Python 3.9.0rc1

    This is the first release candidate of Python 3.9 This release, 3.9.0rc1, is the penultimate release preview. Entering the release candidate phase, only reviewed code changes which are clear bug fixes are allowed between this release candidate and the final release. The second candidate and the last planned release preview is currently planned for 2020-09-14.

  • Python 3.9.0rc1 is now available

    Python 3.9.0 is almost ready. This release, 3.9.0rc1, is the penultimate release preview. You can get it here: https://www.python.org/downloads/release/python-390rc1/ Entering the release candidate phase, only reviewed code changes which are clear bug fixes are allowed between this release candidate and the final release. The second candidate and the last planned release preview is currently planned for 2020-09-14. Please keep in mind that this is a preview release and its use is not recommended for production environments.

  • The Inner Workings of: Arq

    The main point of (what I colloquially call) a job library is, essentially, to execute a function (i.e. job) somewhere else, and potentially at a different time. When using a sync approach to web services (such as when using non-async Django or Flask), the limitations of the synchronous IO model basically require the use of a job library to execute logic outside of the context of a single request handler - if you don't want to do the logic in the scope of a request (and make the request take longer), you need to do it somewhere else, so you need a job library like Celery. A simple example might be an HTTP interface to send an email to a lot of recipients. You might not want the request to wait until all the emails have been sent to return a response since that might take a long time, so you would just schedule a job to run somewhere else to do the work. Job libraries like Celery basically require you to run special worker processes in addition to your web handler processes, and the worker processes use a database to get instructions to run functions, and then they run them.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In | GSoc | #11
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #433 (Aug. 11, 2020)
  • Pysa: An Open-Source Tool To Detect & Fix Security Issues In Python Code

    Facebook has open-sourced Pysa, an internal tool used on Instagram to detect and fix bugs in the huge Python codebase of the app. Pysa can automatically identify vulnerable code snippets written by Facebook engineers before they are integrated into the social network’s systems. It is a static analyzer tool meaning it works by scanning code in a “static” form before the code is compiled. It hunts for common patterns that are usually observed in bugs and flags the potential issues in the code.

  • Facebook Open Sources Analysis Tool for Python Code

    The security-focused tool relies on Pyre, Facebook’s type checker for Python, and allows for the analysis of how data flows through code. It can be used to identify issues related to the protection of user data, as well as flaws such as XSS and SQL injection.

    In addition to making Pysa available in open source, Facebook released many of the definitions that it leverages when looking for security bugs, making it readily available for others to start analyzing their own Python code.

Go 1.15 Release Notes

The latest Go release, version 1.15, arrives six months after Go 1.14. Most of its changes are in the implementation of the toolchain, runtime, and libraries. As always, the release maintains the Go 1 promise of compatibility. We expect almost all Go programs to continue to compile and run as before. Read more Also: Go 1.15 Released With Much Improved Linker, New CPU Mitigations