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Databricks brings its Delta Lake project to the Linux Foundation

Databricks, the big data analytics service founded by the original developers of Apache Spark, today announced that it is bringing its Delta Lake open-source project for building data lakes to the Linux Foundation and under an open governance model. The company announced the launch of Delta Lake earlier this year and even though it’s still a relatively new project, it has already been adopted by many organizations and has found backing from companies like Intel, Alibaba and Booz Allen Hamilton. “In 2013, we had a small project where we added SQL to Spark at Databricks […] and donated it to the Apache Foundation,” Databricks CEO and co-founder Ali Ghodsi told me. “Over the years, slowly people have changed how they actually leverage Spark and only in the last year or so it really started to dawn upon us that there’s a new pattern that’s emerging and Spark is being used in a completely different way than maybe we had planned initially.” This pattern, he said, is that companies are taking all of their data and putting it into data lakes and then do a couple of things with this data, machine learning and data science being the obvious ones. But they are also doing things that are more traditionally associated with data warehouses, like business intelligence and reporting. The term Ghodsi uses for this kind of usage is ‘Lake House.’ More and more, Databricks is seeing that Spark is being used for this purpose and not just to replace Hadoop and doing ETL (extract, transform, load). “This kind of Lake House patterns we’ve seen emerge more and more and we wanted to double down on it.” Read more

Configuring Automatic Login and Lock Screen on Ubuntu 19.10

Whether it’s Linux or Windows, Ubuntu, or Fedora, I am not an ‘automatic’ type of guy. That is to say, and I don’t want my login automated, nor do I want my updates automatically installed. This preference directly results from over thirty years in Information Technology, prudence, habit, and experience. Plus, it’s just plain smart security sense. However, I further realize that as Linux users get younger and younger, I am increasingly in the minority in this sense. While I strongly disagree with automatic logins and updates, I can understand the desire for it. So, with that understanding, let’s go about the business of instituting automated logins in Ubuntu. We will also take the time to address the Ubuntu Lock Screen setting. Configuring automatic Ubuntu software updates is much more in-depth. We will discuss this in a separate dedicated article at a later date. Read more