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Reviews

Review: New gadgets keep Samsung at Android helm, but might not be enough to lure Apple users

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Android
Reviews

Samsung has been facing competition not just from Apple but also from Android manufacturers such as Motorola and Xiaomi, which offer good-enough features while keeping prices low. Consumers will have to decide whether the premium features in the latest Samsung devices will be worth the premium price tags.

The Galaxy S6 Edge Plus and Note 5 phones arrived last week, while the Galaxy Tab S2 tablets come out next Thursday.

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Knoppix 7.4: whom is it for?

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Reviews
Debian

I faced no particular issue when working with Knoppix 7.4.2 in Live session. It was responsive, quick and more or less reliable.

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Samsung Galaxy Note 5 Review: The Best Android Phone That Spares No Expense

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Android
Reviews

The Galaxy Note has been through five years of changes. Better screens, better processors, better software. And like any new smartphone, the Note 5 represents the very best of what’s come before. But despite being a fantastic phone—even foreseeing the big smartphone way of life—the Note 5 is mired in the overpriced premium past. You’ll definitely be shelling out for the very best.

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Zorin OS 10 Core - A good OS if you're coming from a heavy Windows background

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Reviews

Zorin OS Zorin OS is a GNU/Linux distribution that attempts to mimic the appearance of the Microsoft Windows operating system. I gave it a go roughly about a year and eight months ago (Zorin OS 8 Core) and my general impression was that it succeed in doing so, meaning that it was quite appealing in the eyes of a Microsoft Windows user.

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OpenSUSE 13.2 on Lenovo G50 - Bald and beautiful

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Reviews
SUSE

So this time around, the grade is going to be much lower. About 6.5/10. SUSE, please, you're better than that.

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Review: Canonical continues cloud push with Ubuntu 15.04

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Reviews
Ubuntu

According to the latest statistics from The Cloud Market, Ubuntu now accounts for 59% of all images on the Amazon EC2 platform. Windows has 8%, and the other distributions of Linux split the remaining 33%.

Ubuntu’s popularity is due to the operating system's regular updates, easily accessible images, and availability of enterprise-grade support. And, of course, the lack of license fees.

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Kdenlive Easy To Use Video Editor For Linux: Review [Install In Ubuntu, Fedora & Other Distros]

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Linux
Reviews
HowTos


Kdenlive Easy To Use Video Editor For Linux: Review [Install In Ubuntu, Fedora & Other Distros]

If you regularly make videos for your Youtube channel or other video sites then you must try Kdenlive on LinuxKdenlive is a free, open-source and easy to use video editor. It is available for Linux, Mac and FreeBSD. If you're a beginner to video editing then I'm sure Kdenlive will surely help you out. Let's see how to install and use Kdenlive inLinux.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Libreoffice 5 review

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LibO
Reviews

It’s free! It’s open! But does LibreOffice deliver on its promise of a powerful office suite for normal users?

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Also: Should Apache Concede OpenOffice Is Done With & Point Users To LibreOffice?

Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela - Tight as a tiger

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Reviews

Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela is a highly polished, refined, practical, effortless distro. It's a genuine joy to use. Everything works as expected, and best of all, out of the box, by default. The new release brings in an avalanche of small, soft but most effective improvements, including system settings, themes, and software management.

On the bad sides, there are some tiny quirks. Having to leave your bubble of fun and wander around the Internet in search after some new icons or decorations lessens the impact of having a closed and tight ecosystem that can sustain itself. The Realtek bug is also rather annoying and maybe even alarming, and I do not know how to explain the power to brightness applet transformation. But it only happened once.

Overall though, the impression is very similar to Xubuntu Vivid. Slightly more restrained, because I've learned to accept the fact Mint is a top notch player, whereas Xubuntu used to be a black swan underdog and now it's a majestic phoenix sweeping over the forests of distrolandia, and there's more of a dramatic effect there. But then, tiny tiny glitches, the family woes, and a whole lot of goodness, elegance, great software, and not a single crash. My 10/10 wizard stick is out again, and it's trickling faerie dust. 9.99999/10. Not perfect, because perfection means zero flaws. But you should be testing this one, right now. See you around.

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Wayland in Fedora 23 Linux Allows for Use of Multiple Monitors with Different DPIs

Fedora Project, through Christian Schaller, was proud to report on the progress made for the next-generation Wayland display server that it might be used by default on the upcoming major release of the Fedora Linux operating system, Fedora 23. Read more

GNOME Developers Discuss Codenames, GNOME 3.18 Might be Dubbed "Gothenburg"

Allan Day, a GNOME UX designer working for Red Hat and renowned GNOME developer/contributor, opened an interesting discussion on the official GNOME mailing list, about possible codenames for upcoming releases of the acclaimed desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating systems. Read more

Developer lowers Drupal's barrier to entry

From a consumer perspective, I'd like open source to be ubiquitous to the point of invisibility. Using recent Ubuntu distros, I'm always shocked at how professional the environment feels. Just five years ago, you'd need to hunt down drivers and do a bunch of fiddling to get basic things like a sound card working. Now there are so many pushbutton ways to deploy open source tech, from OSes to CMS distros on Pantheon to buying an Android-powered mobile phone. We're not quite to the point where CMS users can feel like open source is transparent; there's still a huge investment in vendors to give you the expertise to manage your Drupal or WordPress site, for example. But we're closer than we were a decade ago, and that's pretty exciting. Read more

Intel invests $60 million in drone venture

Intel is investing $60 million in UAV firm Yuneec, whose prosumer “Typhoon” drones use Android-based controllers. Intel Corp. CEO Brian Krzanich and Yuneec International CEO Tian Yu took to YouTube to announce an Intel investment of more than $60 million in the Hong Kong based company to help develop drone technology. No more details were provided except for Krzanich’s claim that “We’ve got drones on our road map that are going to truly change the world and revolutionize the industry.” One possibility is that Intel plans to equip the drones with its RealSense 3D cameras (see farther below). Read more