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Reviews

A Visual Review to deepin 15.4 GNU/Linux Beauty

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Reviews

deepin 15.4 is really beautiful in every single detail. The beauty of deepin lies on its simplicity, drop shadow and translucency style, with completeness of feature. All the beauty cost only around 730MB of RAM at idle time. It's so user-friendly until I believe kids can use GNU/Linux easier with this. It has its native applications that are fulfilling daily needs, complete in feature, and always with pretty look. The desktop menu understands the users, with greatly accessible features. The Control Center is great as well, making the users have complete control with less learning curve. I believe anyone formerly using Windows, MacOS, Android, even any GNU/Linux distro will be easy to switch to deepin 15.4.

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Ubuntu 17.04: Unity's swan song?

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Reviews
Ubuntu

For the most part, not much has changed on Ubuntu's Desktop edition in the past year. Unity 7 has more or less remained the same while work was progressing on the next version of the desktop, Unity 8. However, now that both desktops are being retired in favour of the GNOME desktop, running Ubuntu 17.04 feels a bit strange. This week I was running software that has probably reached the end of its life and this version of Ubuntu will only be supported for nine months. I could probably get the same desktop experience and most of the same hardware support running Ubuntu 16.04 and get security updates through to 2021 in the bargain. In short, I don't think Ubuntu 17.04 offers users anything significant over last year's 16.04 LTS release and it will be retired sooner.

That being said, I could not help but be a little wistful about using Unity 7 again. Even though it has been about a year since I last used Unity, I quickly fell back into the routine and I was once more reminded how pleasant it can be to use Unity. The desktop is geared almost perfectly to my workflow and the controls are set up in a way that reduces my mouse usage to almost nothing. I find Unity a very comfortable desktop to use, especially when application menus have been moved from the top panel to inside their own windows. While there are some projects trying to carry on development of Unity, this release of Ubuntu feels like Unity's swan song and I have greatly enjoyed using the desktop this week.

While there is not much new in Ubuntu 17.04, the release is pretty solid. Apart from the confusion that may arise from having three different package managers, I found Ubuntu to be capable, fairly newcomer friendly and stable. Everything worked well for me, at least on physical hardware. Unity is a bit slow to use in a virtual machine, but the distribution worked smoothly on my desktop computer.

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Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapata - Viva la revolucion!

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus, or let's face it, Zapata, is a decent release. It has nothing to do with the recent announcement. No hidden symbolism or nostalgia. Simply put, some of the old issues seem to have been ironed out, with the focus on hardware support, speed and some rough edges and papercuts here and there. Pretty nice. Good fonts, too!

However, the live session is uber-boring, the multimedia stack is a bit weak, and some of the default applications are just useless, thank you Gnome. There are also several visual bugs lingering about, and they shouldn't be there. Other than that, I don't have anything else negative to say about Zesty. Oh, you still cannot right-click to create new files. Someone needs to have their laptop confiscated for life. Well, if you like Ubuntu or feel like testing, Zesty offers an improvement experience compared to the last several releases. This is a welcome change, and could signal a fresh breath of hope that is so desperately needed. Grade wise, 7/10. Now, your turn to play.

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Ubuntu 17.04 Review: Except for the Horrible DNS Issue (now ‘fixed’), a Good Release. Oh and, Farewell Unity!

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Apparently, the recently released Ubuntu operating system (17.04) will be the last time Ubuntu will feature its own desktop shell ‘Unity’ which was first introduced back in 2010. So, it survived 7 years, almost. It actually did not ‘survive’, in my opinion, even though I myself was too quick to criticize it (well, back then I was young, somewhat), it thrived! Sure the desktop may have had its flaws, but compared to the GNOME3, the foundation of which Unity was heavily relying upon, Unity was a much sensible desktop shell to use. That is at least my judgement after using it for all these years.

Ubuntu had to let go Unity because, well first they lost the ideological battle (they were never fully trusted by the coding elite of Free Software Movement & they may have had their reasons, granted, but they never trusted what Ubuntu represented ideologically. As a subtle example, observe that despite using the GNOME’s foundation, Ubuntu was always inclined towards using Qt), and secondly, there wasn’t enough man-power to push forward their technological implementations with brute force (Mir & Unity8 are just two examples) because unless the ‘external circumstances’ are already in place, ideas alone cannot change anything.

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Also: Canonical Reboots Convergence; Introduces the No Desktop Environment [Satire]

Ubuntu 17.10 Release Date Announced — What New Features To Expect?

GNU/Linux Review: Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus

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KDE
Reviews

Kubuntu 17.04 has been released on April 13th 2017. This review introduces some aspects of Kubuntu from it's appearance, memory usage, to default software and customization. It's surprisingly more lightweight in memory use than Ubuntu Unity, with gorgeous and Windows-like look, with complete default applications. This Zesty Zapus release is a good start for any new user to choose Kubuntu as daily OS for personal and collective purposes. Enjoy Kubuntu!

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Trying Out The New Installer Of Ubuntu Server

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Server
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu developers today have announced a "tech preview" of their new text-based installer for Ubuntu Server.

Earlier this month we heard of a new Ubuntu Server installer being worked on and it was dubbed Subiquity. Now that the 17.04 release has cleared and 17.10 development begun, the new installer was announced as a tech preview for Ubuntu Server 17.04.

Mathieu Trudel-Lapierre announced, "During the 17.04 development cycle, the Ubuntu Foundations team has been working on a new experimental installer for servers. We are now ready to get feedback from a wider audience."

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Farewell Unity, you challenged desktop Linux. Oh well, here's Ubuntu 17.04

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GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

Unity and I never saw eye to eye, but it did a good job of pushing the Linux desktop in new directions and it emphasised something that, particularly when it arrived, was otherwise lacking – innovation in design.

Unity might have borrowed a few elements from Apple's OS X, but it quickly outgrew those initial imitations and forged its own path and its own aesthetic, something that's all too rare in open-source software.

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Review On Ubuntu Budgie 17.04: Newest Ubuntu Flavor

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Budgie is a new desktop interface built from scratch which focuses on simplicity and elegance. It is developed by the Solus team. It uses GNOME technologies beside their own modifications to give a better user experience.

Ubuntu Budgie is an Ubuntu-based distribution which uses Budgie desktop interface as its default. It’s an official Ubuntu flavor. Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 was the first release of this distribution, which was released 3 days ago.

We downloaded the new distribution and played with it for a while to see what it has. This was our experience. TL;DR: Generally so good, nothing so special to see, but there are some small glitches.

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Also: Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 review

Tiny Core: Small Footprint, Big Potential

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Linux
Reviews

Tiny Core comes in a few architectures. It is available for ARM, x86 and x86_64 processors.

Tiny Core Linux may not have all the bells and whistles you get from a more functional Linux distro. However, if you prefer telling your OS what to do rather than the other way around, Tiny Core Linux could be an interesting alternative for you.

I was impressed with Tiny Core's speed and simplicity. It is a Linux variant that can let you work without desktop distractions. It is also a handy and tiny OS very suitable for tinkering. It is an ideal OS option to familiarize users with a hefty collection of lightweight classic desktop environments.

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Galaxy S8 and S8+ review: Another pair of excellent mainstream smartphones from Samsung

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Android
Reviews

When you talk about Samsung's Galaxy smartphones, it's hard not to talk about 'the average consumer.' Because the Galaxy S series is the second-most popular line of smartphones on earth, its audience is unashamedly mainstream, and the vast majority of sales of these devices will be to consumers who aren't what you'd call tech-savvy. The issue for Samsung, increasingly, is learning how to split the difference between a smartphone that provides a good experience for everybody and maintaining that all important credibility with its fans and enthusiasts.

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