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Reviews

System76 Meerkat: The Perfect Mini PC for Multimedia or Desktop

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Linux
Reviews

Every so often I get the pleasure of writing a review where the biggest challenge is finding something, anything, to nitpick in order to ensure I don’t sound like I’ve been bought off by the company. Such is the case with the Meerkat, by System76. A small device that, at first blush, one might think a toy. I can assure you, this 4.5” by 4.5” device performs with the power of a machine three or four times its size.

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Debian Reviews

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Reviews
Debian
  • Fun with Debian 8.0 "Jessie"

    The Debian project has a long and rich legacy. Debian is one of the oldest surviving GNU/Linux distributions and, along the way, it has also become one of the largest (over 1,000 developers work on Debian, providing users with over 40,000 packages) and Debian has even branched out, adding GNU/FreeBSD and GNU/Hurd ports to its list of offerings. Debian is sometimes referred to as the "universal operating system" because it runs on a wide array of architectures, offering not only a production branch (Stable), but also multiple development branches (Testing, Unstable and Experimental). Debian, in short, provides a little something for everyone. This "universal" approach, which allows Debian to work just about anywhere while doing almost anything, also attracts developers who wish to build products using Debian's packages and open infrastructure. Many of the world's more popular Linux distributions, including Linux Mint and Ubuntu, have their roots in Debian.

  • Systemd hee hee: Jessie Debian gallops (slowly) into view

    The Debian Project may not be that slow with new releases, but sometimes it feels like it. The project typically releases a new version "when it's ready," which seems to work out to about once every two years lately.

    Debian 8, branded Jessie, in keeping with the Toy Story naming scheme (Jessie was the cowgirl character in Toy Story 2 and Toy Story 3) had its feature freeze in November 2014 and there's a been a beta and RC release available for testing. It wasn't until the end of April when Jessie was finally judged range ready.

Ubuntu 15.04 review: Beauty or “boring” is in the eye of the beholder

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Snow melts and trees blossom, but nothing really says spring around the Ars Orbital HQ like the arrival of a new version of Ubuntu Linux. Right on schedule, Canonical has recently released Ubuntu 15.04, also known as Vivid Vervet.

Ubuntu 15.04 arrived in late April and has, judging by other reviews, largely underwhelmed. According to the popular storyline, there's not much new in 15.04. Of course, a slew of changes and unforeseen features in 15.04 could have just as easily earned a negative reaction, probably from the same people calling the actual release boring. The top of the Linux mountain is a lonely, criticism-strewn place.

The truth is, this line of thought is partially correct. There isn't much new in 15.04, at least not in terms of visible changes to the Unity desktop.

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Chromixium – An Ubuntu Based Google’s Chrome OS Clone

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Google
Reviews
Ubuntu

Today, We have come up with an interesting news for both Ubuntu and Chrome OS users. Meet Chromixium – the new modern desktop operating system based on Ubuntu that has the functionality, look and feel of Google’s “Chrome OS”. Chromixium has brought the elegant simplicity of Chromebook and flexibility and stability of Ubuntu together. Chromixium puts the web front and center of the user experience. Web and Chrome apps work straight out of the browser to connect you to all your personal, work and education networks. Sign into Chromium to sync all your apps and bookmarks. When you are offline or when you need more power, you can install any number of applications for work or play, including LibreOffice, Skype, Steam and a whole lot more. Security updates are installed seamlessly and effortlessly in the background and will be supplied until 2019. You can install Chromixium in place of any existing operating system, or alongside Windows or Linux.

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BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review: A promising start

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The first 'production' smartphone running the Ubuntu operating system is finally here. Designed and marketed by the Spanish company BQ (not to be confused with the Chinese company BQ Mobile) and made in China, the first Ubuntu Phone is based on the 4.5-inch BQ Aquaris E4.5, which normally ships with Android 4.4. Included with the BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition are two copies of the quick-start guide (in four languages each, one of the eight being English), a charger (with a built-in two-pin continental mains plug) and a 1-metre USB-to-Micro-USB cable. A comprehensive User Manual is available for download from the BQ website. The list price for the Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition, which is only available in the EU, is €169.90 (~£125).

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Also: Ubuntu and Windows set to contest desktop/smartphone hybrid market

Ubuntu phone that works as a desktop PC coming in 2015

Google's New 'Password Alert' Extension Another Step To Protect Against Phishing Attempts

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Development
News
Reviews


Google's New 'Password Alert' Extension Another Step To Protect Against Phishing Attempts

Google has taken another step toward protecting users from fishing attempts by releasing a new Google Chrome extension 'Password Alert'. The extension protects users from being gmail account overused with other non-google websites. As soon as it detects that the password has been exposed to any non-google website/service, it prompts to reset password immediately. 

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

The loudest lesson from Ubuntu Vivid Vervet: If it’s not broken …

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Those who are partial to Ubuntu know that every six months the good people at Canonical, the people behind Ubuntu, release a new version to its popular Operating System. Well if you somehow missed the big event, the latest iteration of Ubuntu and all its cousins like Kubuntu, Ubuntu Mate, Lubuntu, Xubuntu and Ubuntu Gnome, were released on the 24th of April.

As usual, you get to decide which flavor you prefer depending on your hardware some of the flavors like Lubuntu are to be recommended over the default Unity based installation especially if your hardware is dated.

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Seek Thermal - Android Infrared Camera Review

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Android
Reviews

The costs associated with thermal imaging systems have restricted their usage and kept it out of reach of the average consumer / impulse-buy territory. However, there have been some recent advancements in this field that have made the prices of such system more palatable to the non-professional users. Thanks to the advent of smart mobile devices, the costs associated with the storage, control and user-interface for these systems could be taken out for most markets. One of the first forays into this space was the $250 FLIR ONE personal thermal imager from FLIR Systems. Unfortunately, by restricting the hardware design to work only with the Apple iPhone 5 and 5s, they lost out on widespread market appeal. Seek Thermal entered the market with a splash by launching their first smartphone-attached infrared camera for just $199. Two distinct models carrying the same features and capabilities were launched, only differing in the connector - one with a microUSB interface for Android devices and another with a Lightning connector for iOS devices. Before talking in detail about the Android version of the camera and the associated mobile app, let us take a moment to understand how thermal imaging works - particularly since this is not something we have covered on our site before.

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Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

By the time we had a chance to review Ubuntu 15.04, the final release date had passed and it had already shipped. But it’s important to point out that our final review is based on a Beta release. However, the tasks that we threw at the latest iteration of Ubuntu, were easily completed without any major issues.

The boot process of Ubuntu 15.04 was great. Even when running the operating system in Live mode, it is so responsive that you could be forgiven for thinking that it was physically installed on real metal. Read below, for a bit more of an in-depth glance at what we think of Ubuntu 15.04.

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Today in Techrights

Ubuntu for Desktop Spotted Running on NVIDIA Shield Tablet

The NVIDIA Shield Tablet is a gaming device built by Nvidia that has very specific user niche, but a user of this tablet managed to run Ubuntu on it; not the mobile version, but the desktop one. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Xfce Power Manager 1.5.0 Finally Ported to GTK3+
    Xfce's Power Manager was getting behind the times, but it has been updated and ported to GTK+ 3.14. As you can imagine, this is an important update, and it packs other changes as well.
  • There Are 140k Benchmark Results So Far On LinuxBenchmarking.com
    Yesterday data access to LinuxBenchmarking.com was opened, the public results viewer to the immense amount of test data -- primarily the Linux kernel, LLVM Clang, and GCC -- collected on a daily basis within the new server room. Here's some numbers behind it.
  • Interview with Andrei Rudenko
    When I became interested in Linux and open source. I found Krita, it had everything that I needed for a digital painting. For me it is important to repeat that feeling like you paint using traditional materials.
  • KDE Plasma 5.3.1 Is Out with Fix for "Show Desktop"
    The KDE Community has just revealed that Plasma 5.3.1, the desktop for the KDE project, has been made available, and it comes with a large number of changes and various small fixes.
  • Friction Building Around An Ubuntu Community Council Decision
    Scott Kitterman exposed the email exchanges today of the Ubuntu Community Council informing Jonathan Riddell that due to his aggressive, confrontational behavior towards some within the Ubuntu community and Canonical, he should step away from "all positions of leadership in the Ubuntu Community for at least 12 months." His leadership positions should be put aside for both Ubuntu and Kubuntu while he would be able to keep his upload/commit rights and still participate as a member of the Ubuntu community.
  • Reaffirmed on the Kubuntu Council
    I’d like to thank all the Kubuntu members who just voted to re-affirm me on the Kubuntu Council. Scott Kitterman’s blog post has a juicy details of the unprecedented and astonishing move by the Ubuntu Community Council asking me to step down as Kubuntu leader. I’ve never claimed to be a leader and never used or been given any such title so it’s a strange request without foundation and without following the normal channels documented of consultation or Code of Conduct reference.
  • Mark Shuttleworth, Ubuntu Community Council ask Kubuntu developer to step down as leader
    Friction between the lead Kubuntu developer Jonathan Riddell and Ubuntu reached extreme temperatures on Monday when the Ubuntu Community Council (UCC) asked Riddell to step down from the position of Kubuntu Leader.
  • The last planned Qt 4 release is here: Qt 4.8.7. Is your app runnning with Qt5?
  • Qt 4.8.7 Released with over 150 Improvements and Bug Fixes
    On May 26, the Qt Company, through Tuukka Turunen, had the great pleasure of announcing the immediate availability for download of the seventh maintenance release of Qt 4.8.
  • Qt 4.8.7 Released - Marks The End Of Qt4
    While Qt 5 has so many compelling advantages over Qt4, for those still running the older version of the Norwegian toolkit, version 4.8.7 of Qt4 is now available and it ships with tons of changes.
  • GNOME Disk Utility 3.17.2
    The GNOME Project released version 3.17.2 of Disks, better known as GNOME Disk Utility. This utility contains several significant improvements and new features, for example D-Bus is now activatable and the appearance of the volume grid has been refined.
  • Technology Is A Tool, Not A Learning Outcome
    Croatia is gaining in usage of GNU/Linux. That TFA was written shows the awareness of a lack of availability of IT. All that is needed to bridge the digital divide is for Croatian schools to catch up with and to exceed the rest of society in using GNU/Linux, the right way to do IT in education. Croatia needs to treble its IT in schools. That isn’t going to happen with Wintel. With FLOSS it is possible and can be done within a few years for no extra expenditure. With a little extra effort the change can be done in two years.
  • Gartner Reports Strong Chromebook Sales in Schools, Enterprises...Not So Much
    Gartner researchers report that worldwide Chromebook sales are set to reach 7.3 million units in 2015, a 27 percent jump from the 5.7 million units sold last year.
  • You might be surprised by how few businesses protect their Linux servers with antivirus
  • Alpine 3.2.0 Features MATE 1.10, Xfce 4.12, and Linux Kernel 3.18
    Natanael Copa has been happy to announce today, May 26, the immediate availability for download of the Alpine Linux 3.2.0 operating system, which includes several attractive new features.
  • Ubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf Started Updating The GNOME Packages To Version 3.16
    Canonical has added some of the GNOME 3.16 packages in their Ubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf system, but the changes will not be spotted by the regular user. The problem is not with the updated applications, but with an upgraded GTK version, which may really affect the system. Before implementing apps by default, Canonical patches them to work well with Unity, basic on the philosophy that an app that works well does not need to get updated.

Leftovers: Software