Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Reviews

Review: Redcore Linux 1706

Filed under
Reviews

Redcore Linux is a desktop distribution based on the source-based Gentoo project. Redcore is designed to be quick and easy to install on laptop and desktop computers. The distribution ships with LXQt as the default desktop environment and there is just the one edition of Redcore we can download. Its installation media is built to run exclusively on 64-bit x86 computers.

Booting from Redcore's installation media brings us to a graphical login screen where we can sign into the live desktop environment using "redcore" as both the username and password. Later, if we need to access administrative functions we can elevate our privileges using "root" as both the username and password.

Signing into the live session brings up the LXQt 0.11.0 desktop. A panel runs across the bottom of the screen, providing us with access to the system's application menu, task switcher and system tray. On the desktop we find icons for launching the project's system installer and another for getting help. The latter icon opens a web browser and connects us to a web-based IRC chat room where we can interact with other Redcore users.

Read more

Also: MX Linux saves the day

A Short Review on deepin 15.4.1, with New System Monitor & More

Filed under
Reviews

This review introduces briefly what's new on deepin 15.4.1. It got new UI features such as classic menu and 2D-3D mode switcher, new System Monitor with unique & nice interface, many new mirrors kindly provided by third-parties (big thanks to them!), and so on. Also, I expect you to beware the CPU consumption of deepin-wm on 3D mode (at least until it's fixed by the developers). Finally, enjoy this review!

Read more

Also: Linux Distributions by category

GNU: Review of Technoethical T400s and Glibc 2.27 Development

Filed under
GNU
Reviews
  • Technoethical T400s review

    Over all this is a great device that just works with entirely free software. I thank the Technoethical team for offering this fantastic service. I can only recommend buying one of those T400s laptops from Technoethical.

    [...]

    Therefore I am very excited that you can actually order hardware nowadays that others have checked for best compatibility already. Since my old laptop got very unreliable recently I wanted to do better this time and I went for the Technoethical T400s, which comes pre-installed with Trisquel.

  • Intel Adds AVX2/FMA Optimized Math Functions To Glibc 2.27

    Intel engineers have introduced AVX2/FMA-optimized math functions for glibc and will appear in the project's next stable release.

    There is now optimized asin, atan2, exp, expf, log, pow, atan, sin, and tan functions in glibc Git for benefiting from x86-64 for fused multiply-add, as acknowledged by this commit.

Review: System76’s Galago Pro solves “just works” Linux’s Goldilocks problem

Filed under
Reviews

The Linux world has long maintained a very specific rite of passage: wiping the default operating system from your laptop and plugging in a USB stick with your favorite distro's live CD. Some of us get a little, dare I say, giddy every time we wipe that other OS away and see that first flash of GRUB.

Of course, rites of passage are supposed to be one-time events. Once you've wiped Windows or OS X a time or two, that giddiness vanishes—replaced by a feeling of annoyance, a kind of tax on being a Linux user.

Read more

openSUSE Leap 42.3

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

openSUSE Leap is a conservative distribution that opts for stable packages over the latest and greatest. The latest release of Leap, version 42.3, ships with version 4.4 of the Linux kernel, but with many features backported from newer releases of the kernel. GNOME 3.20 and KDE Plasma 5.8 are the main desktops offered, but Xfce and LXDE can also be installed from the install media, with other options available post-install or via net-install. Firefox 52 ESR is the default browser in both GNOME and KDE and LibreOffice 5.3 serves as the default office suite.

As someone who appreciates a slower, more cautious update cadence, I was intrigued by openSUSE Leap 42.3's package selection. A slightly older desktop environment paired with an ESR Firefox and a recent release of LibreOffice is something I could find myself using as my main distribution, so I downloaded the 4.6GB ISO to give openSUSE Leap 42.3 a trail run. Below, I take a look at openSUSE's installation process, the KDE Plasma desktop, and more before sharing my final thoughts.

Read more

Mageia 6: is it the rise of Phoenix?

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

A few years back, I was very happy running Mageia. I interviewed Mageia team members. I was a pro-Mageia person.

Unfortunately, the lack of updates from the Mageia team made me leave this very nice and promising operating system. I am sure I am not the only person with the same sad feelings.

Will Mageia gain its momentum again now? I hope so. It felt very fast, responsive and reliable during my Live run of Mageia 6 KDE. I faced no single issue, apart from the one with tiny buttons in the notification area. But this issue is too tiny (literally).

Read more

Ubuntu Budgie Distro: Simple, Clean and User-Friendly

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The Budgie desktop lacks the glitz and glitter found in more seasoned desktop environments. Animation is nonexistent.

That said, Budgie is an ideal desktop environment that is very user-friendly. Its customization options and ease-of-use make it a great trade-off.

Still, its design seems a bit too simplified for seasoned Linux users.

Canonical's Ubuntu Linux distro also offers users a Budgie desktop release. Do not confuse that Ubuntu flavor with the Ubuntu Budgie distro. The two desktop integrations have different appearances and feature sets.

Read more

Zazu App - Intelligent artificialness

Filed under
Software
Reviews

Zazu App is an interesting concept, but it's still quite raw. Linux support is flaky unless you mean Ubuntu. You have to manually edit the configuration, which is a fun killer. Most plugins do not run on Linux, and some are just broken, and even with a few of these added, the functionality spectrum is quite lean, especially compared to the likes of Dash or Krunner, both of which look and behave the part. From a purely technological stand point, Zazu App does not have the bells and whistles to defeat the established players.

But maybe that's not the goal. Maybe this is just a sandbox for nerds who love JSON, and for them, it will work well, it will be rich and powerful, and we will see more and more plugins added until this becomes an indispensible engine of artificial intelligence for your desktop. Who knows. At the moment, I'm skeptical. Also, given the rapid development cycle, everything you read here might already be obsolete by the time I publish this article. Such is life. Zazu, neat idea, but it takes more than that to Fandango.

Read more

The Minifree Libreboot T400 is free as in freedom

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

The Libreboot T400 doesn’t look like much. It’s basically a refurbished Lenovo Thinkpad with the traditional Lenovo/IBM pointer nubbin and a small touchpad. It’s a plain black laptop, as familiar as any luggable assigned to a cubicle warrior on the road. But, under the hood, you have a machine that fights for freedom.

The T400 runs Libreboot, a free and open BIOS and the Trisquel GNU/Linux OS. Both of these tools should render the Libreboot T400 as secure from tampering as can be. “Your Libreboot T400 obeys you, and nobody else!” write its creators, and that seems to be the case.

How does it work? And should you spend about $300 on a refurbished Thinkpad with Linux installed? That depends on what you’re trying to do. The model I tested was on the low end with enough speed and performance to count but Trisquel tended to bog down a bit and the secure browser, “an unbranded Mozilla based browser that never recommends non-free software,” was a little too locked down for its own good. I was able to work around a number of the issues I had but this is definitely not for the faint of heart.

Read more

A look at Atom text editor for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software
Reviews

There are so many different text editors out there, some have a GUI, some are terminal based; and so many people prefer different ones for different reasons.

With all that said, there are times when I stumble upon new piece of software that seems to stand out above the rest, and in the case of text editors; Atom has done just that.

Atom is a hackable text editor, meaning that it can be customized almost to an extreme, but yet, is perfectly usable and awesome even just with its default setup.

It’s also available for Windows and MacOS X, but truth be told I’ve only really encountered people using it on GNU/Linux. Not to say there aren’t people using it on other platforms, just my own observations.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

This Week in Techrights

Open source licensing: What every technologist should know

If you’re a software developer today, you know how to use open source software, but do you know how and why open source licensing started? A little background will help you understand how and why the licenses work the way they do. Read more

Kali Linux 2017.2 Release

We are happy to announce the release of Kali Linux 2017.2, available now for your downloading pleasure. This release is a roll-up of all updates and fixes since our 2017.1 release in April. In tangible terms, if you were to install Kali from your 2017.1 ISO, after logging in to the desktop and running ‘apt update && apt full-upgrade’, you would be faced with something similiar to this daunting message: Read more Also: Kali Linux 2017.2 Released With New Hacking Tools — Download ISO And Torrent Files Here

Open source-based business lessons from a seasoned CEO

The default now is to build from open and in the open. So that's a positive. The downside is that by open source being the default, we may be getting a little lazy. If you remember back 5-10 years, open sourcing was a big deal, and it forced a level of rigor that may have led, in some cases, to founders and early investors taking better approaches to building their company—for example, shifting towards SaaS wherever possible, in part because of the ability to demonstrate clear value versus their own open source. Read more