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Reviews

Michael Kors Dylan Access review: Android Wear for everyone

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Android
Reviews

The Michael Kors Access line is available September 6 starting at $350 for the model above (metal/silicone), going up to $395 for the more exclusive gold-tone Bradshaw varieties. Bands begin at $40, rising to $50 for the embossed versions). (In Canada, watch prices begin at $420, rising to $475, with bands running $50 to $60.)

Despite the issues with the charger, and the imperfect display characteristics, I grew to enjoy the Access, and would certainly recommend it to anyone looking to engage with the more fashion-forward varieties of Android Wear. Like the Fossil Q Founder, this smartwatch is more about the brand than the product, and it's clear that certain decisions were made to reinforce its place alongside similarly-designed analog watches in endless glass displays.

But somehow it works: it is both fashionable and functional, the comfortable enough (with a sizeable battery) to wear all day.

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Peppermint OS 7

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Reviews

The latest release of Peppermint OS was launched back in June and I meant to take it for a test drive then. However, one exciting release after another distracted me until now. Peppermint is a project I pay attention to because it is one of the distributions I have had the most success with when it comes to transitioning people from Windows to Linux. Peppermint's lightweight nature, speed, relatively uncluttered interface and solid hardware support (thanks to its underlying Ubuntu base) have made it an attractive option. Peppermint OS 7 is based on packages available through the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS repositories with a few Linux Mint utilities added for flavour. Peppermint runs the LXDE desktop by default and version 7 offers users GPT, UEFI and Secure Boot support. The distribution is available in 32-bit and 64-bit builds for the x86 architecture.

The ISO for the 64-bit build of Peppermint is approximately 1GB in size. Booting from this media displays a menu where we can choose to try the live desktop environment, launch the system installer or check the disc for defects. I took the live desktop option which loads LXDE. The desktop environment is presented with a panel along the bottom of the display. This panel contains our application menu, task switcher and the system tray. The application menu uses unusually large and bold fonts, making the text easy to read. On the desktop we find a single icon we can use to launch the distribution's system installer. The desktop uses a dark theme with brightly coloured icons. Personally, I like the bright icons on a dark background coupled with the large font. I found the combination made it easy to browse the application menu and find launchers I wanted to use.

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openSUSE : Distro Review Of The Week

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Linux
Reviews

openSUSE is one of the best Linux distributions in the world. Apart from Ubuntu, openSUSE is probably one of the best multi-purpose distribution around.The distro is geared towards desktop users and developers working on desktop or server. openSUSE is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise.

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Back to the Future with Salix OS

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Reviews

To modern newcomers, Linux means Linux Mint or Ubuntu — a polished desktop with a few advanced details to differentiate it from any other operating system and a standard set of applications. However, the schools of Linux can be different enough that one distribution can differ from another so much that they could almost be a different operating system. A case in point is Salix OS , whose Xfce 14.2 version has just been released.

Salix is a Slackware-derivative. To anyone familiar with Slackware, or at least its reputation, this simple fact immediately creates expectations of a more than usually Unix-like operating system, and a preference for simplicity over convenience, and the use of a single small application over a large, all-in-one suite. [http://docs.slackware.com/slackware:philosophy], all of which are readily found in Salix..

Admittedly, Salix compromises by including FireFox and LibreOffice, two decidely unSlackware-like applications that are too popular to omit. Salix also uses GLSapt, an apt-get like system that resolves dependencies — something that Slackware itself has been philosophically slow to do. Yet, otherwise, Salix meets the expectations, keeping its releases compatible with Slackware, and in general keeping to the Slackware philosophy. The project is summarized tidily in its slogan, “Linux for the Lazy Slacker” — that is, those appreciate the virtues of simplicity but are willing to let the distribution take over some of the maintenance required to keep things that way.

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Korora 24

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Red Hat
Reviews

The Korora distribution is based on Fedora and provides users with several desktop editions. Each edition of Korora ships with multimedia support and with several third-party repositories enabled. This gives Korora access to a wider range of software with its default configuration.

The latest release of Korora, version 24, is based on Fedora 24 and includes the same changes and technology as its parent. The Korora release is available in four flavours (Cinnamon, GNOME, MATE and Xfce). A fifth edition featuring KDE's Plasma desktop is planned, but was not available when I began this review. The new release media is available for the 64-bit x86 architecture exclusively, however existing Korora 23 users who run 32-bit systems can perform live upgrades to Korora 24. The Pharlap driver manager has been removed from this release.

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Google Android Nougat review:

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Android
Reviews

There's a good reason why Nougat doesn't seem as dense as past Android updates, and that's because a lot of the upgrades happen behind the scenes. It's undoubtedly faster and smoother, and your battery should last longer between charges. These are less-visible -- but still important -- performance gains. But the interface doesn't look or function all that differently, and that's disappointing for a major OS update.

While you should jump on the Android 7.0 update as soon as your phone gets it, you'll be happier thinking of Nougat as the cherry on top of Android 6.0 Marshmallow, not a brand-new dessert. We hope Google follows up with more interesting updates in the months to come -- possibly when rumored new phones hit later this year.

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5 Best Linux Download Managers

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Linux
Reviews

One of the difficulties a new Linux user faces while switching from Windows is finding a good download manager. If you are or have been Windows user you might be familiar with download managers like Internet Download Manager (IDM), Download Accelerator Plus (DAP) etc. There is nothing to worry for Linux users as there are many alternatives Download managers for Linux. And yes these are open source; means you can download them for free. The article below is about few of the popular and free Linux download managers available on the web.

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Tools To Password Protect Folder In Linux

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Linux
Reviews

Most of the time, having a password protected user is all you need to keep your files private and protected from prying eyes. There are those few times when you need to allow access to your account to another person, sometimes there are folders or files you would like to keep away from being accessed. Now we can password protect folder with several handy tools. In the Windows world, these tools are quite easily available for Windows but today we will look at a few options available for the Linux user.

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Fedora 24 review: The year’s best Linux distro is puzzlingly hard to recommend

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Red Hat
Reviews

Fedora 24 is one of the best Linux distro releases you're likely to see this year. And there are two other releases that I did not have room to cover in depth here: the Server and Cloud variants of Fedora 24, which pack in a ton of new features specific to those environments. The cloud platform especially continues to churn out the container-related features, with some new tools for OpenShift Origin, Fedora's Platform-as-a-Service system built around Google's Kubernetes project. Check out Fedora Magazine's release announcement for more on everything that's new in Server and Cloud.

As always, Fedora WorkStation also comes in a variety of "Spins" that are pre-packaged setups for specific use cases. There are prepacked spins of all the major desktops, including Xfce, KDE, MATE, Cinnamon, and LXDE (you can also get alternative desktops in one go by downloading the DVD installer). Spins aren't just for desktops, though. For example, there's an astronomy spin, a design suite spin, robotics-focused spin, a security spin, and several more. None of these spins have anything you can't set up yourself, but if you don't want to put in the time and effort, Fedora can handle that for you.

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The Peppermint Twist Is Still Cool

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OS
Reviews

Peppermint is a solid Linux operating system with a record for good performance and reliability. It is an ideal choice for handling everyday computing chores.

LXDE provides a fast and friendly desktop environment. The entire desktop package and tweaked Peppermint 7 settings give you lots of options for creating a comfortable platform. My only dissatisfaction is the lack of much in the way of desktop animation effects. All it provides are semi-transparent application interfaces in the background.

The Peppermint community is headed by the Peppermint OS LLC, a software company based in Asheville, North Carolina. Founded in 2010, the open source company issues one major release per year. A partial upgrade rolls out periodically.

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Red Hat News

  • Red Hat's Results Underscore its Growing Focus on OpenStack
    Late last week, Red Hat reported earnings per share of 55 cents on revenue of $600 million, beating estimates of 54 cents and $590 million, respectively. One thing that went unsaid across much of the coverage is that the company is in the midst of a major shift in its strategy toward OpenStack-based cloud computing, and it looks like service revenues and positive momentum from that effort are starting to arrive. "Our growth was driven in part by expanding our footprint with customers as we closed a record number of deals over $1 million, up approximately 60 percent year-over-year," Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst said during his company's earnings call. Seven of the top 30 deals had OpenStack in there, nine had RHEV," Whitehurst said. "We had three OpenStack deals alone that were over $1 million. So I think we're seeing really, really, really good traction there."
  • Red Hat targets $5-b revenue in five years
    Open-source technology firm Red Hat Inc, which hit the $2-billion revenue milestone two quarters ago, is looking to achieve $2.4 billion in FY 2017 and $5 billion in the next five years. The company is betting on India, its second largest operation outside the US, as one of the key growth engines to help achieve its aspirational revenue goal of $5 billion by 2021. “India is a bright spot for Red Hat for three reasons,” Rajesh Rege, Managing Director, Red Hat India, told BusinessLine.
  • Red Hat Announces Ansible Tower App for Splunk, Enabling Intelligence and Automation Enhancements
  • Red Hat’s (RHT) “Outperform” Rating Reiterated at Raymond James Financial Inc.
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) PT Raised to $89.00

pump.io Servers Adoption

  • Adopt a pump.io server
    As most of you know, E14N is no longer my main job, and I've been putting my personal time, energy, and money into keeping the pump network up and running. I haven't always done a good job, and some of the nodes have just fallen off the network. I'd like to ask people in the community to start taking over the maintenance and upkeep of these servers.
  • Prodromou: Adopt a pump.io server
    There are currently around 25 servers in the federated network initially started by Prodromou, which does not count other pump.io instances. He notes that one important exception is the identi.ca site, which is significantly larger than the rest, and which he would like to find a trusted non-profit organization to maintain.

Black Lab Linux 8 Beta 3 Released

The development team is pleased to announce the new Beta release of Black Lab Linux 8 – our latest OS offering to bring the best Linux desktop distribution currently on the market. This release moves the kernel and application set away from the prior LTS 14.04 base to the new 16.04 LTS base. Black Lab Linux 8 will showcase 3 desktop environments : MATE, LXDE and GNOME 3. Other improvements include: Full EFI support Kernel 4.4.0-38 LibreOffice 5.2 GNOME Video Rhythmbox Firefox 49 Thunderbird GIMP Full multimedia codec support Read more

Intel Core i7 6800K Benchmarks On Ubuntu + Linux 4.8

While the Core i7 6800K has been available for a few months now, there hadn't been any review on it since Intel hadn't sent out any Broadwell-E samples for Linux testing this time around. However, I did end up finally buying a Core i7 6800K now that the Turbo Boost Max 3.0 support is finally coming together (at first, Intel PR said it wouldn't even be supported on Linux) so that I can run some benchmarks there plus some other interesting items on the horizon for benchmarking. Here are some benchmarks of the i7-6800K from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS with the Linux 4.8 kernel. Read more