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Reviews

ArchLabs Linux Mínimo

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Reviews

ArchLabs is a great combination of lightweight and, thanks to its Arch base, constantly up-to-date software. While probably not for everyone, ArchLabs is a polished distribution that anyone looking for an Arch-based distribution that has a pre-configured desktop and software selection should check out. The only drawback is that, like many lightweight distributions, selecting applications based on what is deemed best for an individual task can result in an odd hodgepodge of applications that all behave differently. Of course, the choice of what to install is up to the user, so that might not be a problem for some, but having applications from Xfce, GNOME, KDE, etc., can lead to a jumbled user experience.

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A look at Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark

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Ubuntu

I’m going to preface this review, and say that I liked Ubuntu 17.10 after using it for a few days. However, there were multiple issues with it, that ultimately ruined my experience; however, your mileage my vary.

Ubuntu 17.10, code-named Artful Aardvark, is the latest Ubuntu Linux release from Canonical, and was released Oct. 19.

It’s the first desktop release of the pure Ubuntu flavor, to not feature the Unity desktop, since Ubuntu 11.04. Now, Ubuntu uses the GNOME desktop environment now.

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Also:

Tried Elementary OS 0.4.1 Loki again - Negatory

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The Linux desktop needs a reset. We're now in a post-Ubuntu world, with Unity gone, and we're back in sad and forlorn 2005. There isn't a single major project out there where you can look and say, wow, there's gonna be a fun and exciting year ahead of us. Well, maybe one or two. The rest? Just run-of-the-mill stuff. The forums are quiet, because there isn't anything to report, and rehashing kernel versions and desktop versions isn't really worth anyone's time.

I think elementary OS represents this crisis quite well. On its own, it's a badly cobbled release, with too many issues and inconsistencies and a dreadful approach to ergonomics, making it useless to most people, all other things notwithstanding. But it was too buggy for me to even attempt to install it. Not going well. Alas, unless something cardinal changes, I cannot recommend this one at all. The combo of visual glitches, mediocre performance and middling hardware support does not warrant a longer adventure. Perhaps one day this will change, but for now, you're better off with stock Ubuntu. And by that I mean up to Zesty, ad I haven't tried Aardvark yet. Take care, and stay golden.

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Also: Newbie's Guide to Ubuntu 17.10 Part 3

10 Reasons Why I Switched To Telegram Messenger

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Whatsapp may be the best player in the game when it comes to instant messaging apps, but Telegram Messenger is the entire game itself.

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Anarchy Linux Dispels Fear of Arch

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Linux
Reviews

Arch-Anywhere/Anarchy Linux is one of the nicest Arch-based distributions I have encountered. However, Anarchy Linux still requires familiarity with terminology and processes that usually are not needed to install Linux distros from a fully-functioning live session installation disk. Not having a demo mode to preview how the OS runs on your particular hardware can be a time-consuming setback.

However, once you have Anarchy Linux up and running, it will give you a very pleasing computing experience. Much of what happens after installation depends on the desktop environment you selected.

If you have a desktop preference or prefer one of the included window manager environments instead, you can forget about the sullied reputation that comes with Arch Linux distros. For many reasons, Anarchy Linux is a winning choice.

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Ubuntu 17.10: Hands-on with Artful Aardvark

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 17.10, Artful Aardvark, has now been officially released. I have not been much of an Ubuntu fan for a long time now, but this release includes a lot of significant changes, many of which might address some of my most serious objections about Ubuntu. So I think I should take a closer look at it than I normally do.

The release announcement mentions the major updates and changes - including the biggest of all, the switch from Unity back to Gnome 3 / Gnome Shell for the desktop. As I have not liked Unity from the very first time I saw it (that's a polite way to phrase it), I am very, very pleased with this change.

The release notes (for all versions) give a more complete list of packages updated, and a list of known issues. It also includes a statement that I know some users will not be pleased with:

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Motorola Moto X4 Android One review: a Nexus by any other name

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Android
Reviews

That’s been a tough pill for many fans of the prior Nexus phones to swallow, as they frequently offered a lot of specs and performance for a lot less money than other smartphones. You could realistically get a great Nexus phone for under $500 without having to give up the traits that make them great: clean software, fast performance, and timely updates.

Enter Motorola’s new Moto X4 Android One smartphone. While not technically a Nexus phone, it shares many of the same qualities that made the Nexus line so loved. Clean build of Android? Check. Promise of fast updates and years of software support? Check. Reasonable cost? Check.

The $399 X4 won’t appeal to everyone. It’s not meant to compete with the Pixel or other premium phone in terms of features or performance, and its biggest limitation is that it’s only available on Google’s own Project Fi network. (Though it comes unlocked and works with other networks, the only way to buy this flavor of X4 is to be a Fi customer.) But if you’ve been holding on to that aging Nexus 5X hoping something would come along and pick up its mantle, the Moto X4 Android One version is it.

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Ubuntu 17.10: What’s New? [Video]

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Ubuntu

It’s Artful Aardvark arrival day today (no, really!) and to mark the occasion we’ve made our first video in 3 years!

Prime your eyeballs and pop in some earbuds as we (try to) bring you up to speed on what’s new in Ubuntu 17.10.

At a smidgen over 3 minutes long we think our video is perfect for watching on your commute; when you’re bleary eyed in bed; or when you get the tl;dr feels thinking about our fuller, longer, and far wordier Ubuntu 17.10 review (due out shortly).

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Plasma 5.11 – Keep the momentum going

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KDE
Reviews

Just a few short days ago, the KDE team released Plasma 5.11, the latest edition of this desktop environment, plied with a range of bug fixes as well as some new features. Reason enough to celebrate, but even more so when you consider the fact that Plasma has been slowly, steadily – and consistently – improving over the past few years.

For me, the culmination of this effort is my great satisfaction with Plasma – epitomized in the shape and form of Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zoltan, including the most excellent twining of the distro with my HP Pavilion laptop. And on this very machine, I will be testing the KDE neon live edition, furnished with the latest desktop version. So let’s see what it does.

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Also: GCompris at KDE-edu sprint 2017

Review: Google Pixel 2

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Android
Google
Reviews

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • [LabPlot] Improved data fitting in 2.5
    Until now, the fit parameters could in principle take any values allowed by the fit model, which would lead to a reasonable description of the data. However, sometimes the realistic regions for the parameters are known in advance and it is desirable to set some mathematical constrains on them. LabPlot provides now the possibility to define lower and/or upper bounds for the fit parameters and to limit the internal fit algorithm to these regions only.
  • [GNOME] Maps Towards 3.28
    Some work has been done since the release of 3.26 in September. On the visual side we have adapted the routing sidebar to use a similar styling as is used in Files (Nautilus) and the GTK+ filechooser.
  • MX 17 Beta 2
  • MiniDebconf in Toulouse
    I attended the MiniDebconf in Toulouse, which was hosted in the larger Capitole du Libre, a free software event with talks, presentation of associations, and a keysigning party. I didn't expect the event to be that big, and I was very impressed by its organization. Cheers to all the volunteers, it has been an amazing week-end!
  • DebConf Videoteam sprint report - day 0
    First day of the videoteam autumn sprint! Well, I say first day, but in reality it's more day 0. Even though most of us have arrived in Cambridge already, we are still missing a few people. Last year we decided to sprint in Paris because most of our video gear is stocked there. This year, we instead chose to sprint a few days before the Cambridge Mini-Debconf to help record the conference afterwards.
  • Libre Computer Board Launches Another Allwinner/Mali ARM SBC
    The Tritium is a new ARM single board computer from the Libre Computer Board project. Earlier this year the first Libre Computer Board launched as the Le Potato for trying to be a libre and free software minded ARM SBC. That board offered better specs than the Raspberry Pi 3 and aimed to be "open" though not fully due to the ARM Mali graphics not being open.
  • FOSDEM 2018 Will Be Hosting A Wayland / Mesa / Mir / X.Org Developer Room
    This year at the FOSDEM open-source/Linux event in Brussels there wasn't the usual "X.Org dev room" as it's long been referred to, but for 2018, Luc Verhaegen is stepping back up to the plate and organizing this mini graphics/X.Org developer event within FOSDEM.
  • The Social Network™ releases its data networking code
    Facebook has sent another shiver running up Cisco's spine, by releasing the code it uses for packet routing. Open/R, its now-open source routing platform, runs Facebook's backbone and data centre networks. The Social Network™ first promised to release the platform in May 2017. In the post that announced the release, Facebook said it began developing Open/R for its Terragraph wireless system, but since applied it to its global fibre network, adding: “we are even starting to roll it out into our data center fabrics, running inside FBOSS and on our Open Compute Project networking hardware like Wedge 100.”
  • Intel Icelake Support Added To LLVM Clang
    Initial support for Intel's Icelake microarchitecture that's a follow-on to Cannonlake has been added to the LLVM/Clang compiler stack. Last week came the Icelake patch to GCC and now Clang has landed its initial Icelake enablement too.
  • Microsoft's Surface Book 2 has a power problem
     

    Microsoft’s Surface Book 2 has a power problem. When operating at peak performance, it may draw more power than its stock charger or Surface Dock can handle. What we’ve discovered after talking to Microsoft is that it’s not a bug—it’s a feature.

Kernel: Linux 4.15 and Intel

  • The Big Changes So Far For The Linux 4.15 Kernel - Half Million New Lines Of Code So Far
    We are now through week one of two for the merge window of the Linux 4.15 kernel. If you are behind on your Phoronix reading with the many feature recaps provided this week of the different pull requests, here's a quick recap of the changes so far to be found with Linux 4.15:
  • Intel 2017Q3 Graphics Stack Recipe Released
    Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has put out their quarterly Linux graphics driver stack upgrade in what they are calling the latest recipe. As is the case with the open-source graphics drivers just being one centralized, universal component to be easily installed everywhere, their graphics stack recipe is just the picked versions of all the source components making up their driver.
  • Intel Ironlake Receives Patches For RC6 Power Savings
    Intel Ironlake "Gen 5" graphics have been around for seven years now since being found in Clarkdale and Arrandale processors while finally now the patches are all worked out for enabling RC6 power-savings support under Linux.

Red Hat: OpenStack and Financial News

Security: Google and Morgan Marquis-Boire

  • Google: 25 per cent of black market passwords can access accounts

    The researchers used Google's proprietary data to see whether or not stolen passwords could be used to gain access to user accounts, and found that an estimated 25 per cent of the stolen credentials can successfully be used by cyber crooks to gain access to functioning Google accounts.

  • Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials

    Drawing upon Google as a case study, we find 7--25\% of exposed passwords match a victim's Google account.

  • Infosec star accused of sexual assault booted from professional affiliations
    A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault. On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire's home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years. A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym "Lila," provided The Verge with "both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia."