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Bodhi Linux 3.2 Promises Clearer Path to Enlightenment

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Linux
Reviews

Bodhi Linux is elegant and lightweight. It is based on Ubuntu but runs only the forked E17 desktop. It is a very handy distro for those who like the idea of designing their own customized desktop look and feel. You literally have no bloat because you only add what you want to use.

Despite the kudos for Bodhi's configurability, the relatively young desktop environment is devoid of much of the eye candy and animated niceties found in heavier-weight desktops such as Cinnamon and KDE. This is by design and is not a shortcoming. Bodhi is first and foremost true to its minimalistic philosophy.

Bodhi is very easy to use. It has a low learning curve; new Linux users can get acquainted right away. A Quick Start wiki automatically loads on first run.

You can install Bodhi as a dual boot on a Chromebook.

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Magic happens with the Ubuntu tablet

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Reviews
Ubuntu

If you're looking for a tablet that will allow you to get your work done, one that won't break your bank (the M10 currently runs for around $260.00 USD - purchase here), and one that can serve nearly all your needs (from mobile to desktop), the Ubuntu Tablet has you covered. Once Ubuntu Touch matures, this device will be a game changer...of that there is no doubt.

Canonical, I am seriously impressed.

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10 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 16.04 "Xenial Xerus"

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Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 16.04 has brought some interesting features that you must give try if you've upgraded. If you still don't know what's new in Ubuntu 16.04 then check out our article "What's New In Ubuntu 16.04?". In this article I'll show you 10 things to do after installing or upgrading to Ubuntu 16.04. It'll save your time tweaking the system and also will provide you the taste of new features of Ubuntu 16.04.

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Kali Linux 2016.1

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Reviews

Kali Linux Kali Linux, which was formally known as BackTrack, is a forensic and security-focused distribution based on Debian's Testing branch. Kali Linux is designed with penetration testing, data recovery and threat detection in mind. The project switched over to a rolling release model earlier this year in an effort to provide more up to date security utilities to the distribution's users.

I have been finding a lot of posts about Kali Linux from Linux newcomers on various forums and social media recently and this surprised me. Kali Linux is not marketed toward novice users, in fact the distribution has a fairly narrow focus (security, forensics and penetration testing) so I was eager to experiment with the distribution and see if I could find out why so many newcomers to Linux have been installing Kali as their first GNU/Linux distribution.

Kali Linux is available in two editions, with each edition available in 32-bit and 64-bit x86 builds. The main (or full) edition ships with the GNOME desktop and a large suite of security tools. The Light edition features fewer tools and the Xfce desktop. There is also an ARM port of Kali Linux. The 64-bit build of the main edition is 2.7GB in size and this is the ISO I downloaded for the purposes of my trial.

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Ubuntu 16.04 Brings More Privacy and Big Changes to the Desktop

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Ubuntu

The release of Ubuntu 16.04 last week is good news for computer users who are upset over the recent development of Microsoft turning Windows into an operating system that is essentially spyware. As an open-source Linux distribution, Ubuntu is a great operating system for users concerned about privacy.

This marks the 24th release of the Ubuntu operating system, which has become perhaps the most popular Linux distribution in the world. Ubuntu 16.04 — codenamed Xenial Xerus — is also the sixth Long Term Support (LTS) release, meaning it will receive free security updates and support for five years. Canonical — the UK software company which sponsors Ubuntu — has continued to show its commitment to providing a solid, smooth, reliable, open-source operating system for the desktop even while working toward convergence of the desktop, phone, and tablet into one seamless operating system.

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Aquaris M10 HD Ubuntu Edition review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

A few months ago when the Aquaris M10 with Ubuntu was announced I was very excited. First of all the first device with convergence, a dream of Canonical even before Microsoft told a word about "one (scaled down) Windows". But also the first (commercial) tablet with the Linux kernel. And of course an ARM chip! We all know what happened to WinRT, but there is one difference here. It's ubuntu. They have the source of 99% of the packages people use + they have official ports to ARM already available! (I even use those to host this blog) So with XMir it is able to run all those apps.

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Also: Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus)

LXD 2.0 is released

PCLOS 2016.03 KDE: good job

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PCLOS
Reviews

I must admit that this time I had a much nicer experience with PC Linux OS than I had the previous time.

I could not find any issue to note during my Live run of this operating system apart from escessive number of applications.

Good job, PCLOS team! Let's hope you'll keep up with all you've done!

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Raspberry Pi 3 review: The revolutionary $35 mini-PC cures its biggest headaches

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Linux
Reviews

At first blush, the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B appears physically identical to the year-old Raspberry Pi 2 Model B: the same port selection, the same GPIO pin layout, the same basic board layout, et cetera. But don’t let that fool you! The leap to the Raspberry Pi 3 is just as significant as the prior upgrade, supercharging performance even further and eliminating what few lingering setup hassles remained in the Raspberry Pi formula, all while maintaining the same dirt-cheap $35 price point.

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Also: Arduino compatible IoT board offers LoRa wireless

PCLOS 2016.03 KDE: good job

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PCLOS
Reviews

I must admit that this time I had a much nicer experience with PC Linux OS than I had the previous time.

I could not find any issue to note during my Live run of this operating system apart from escessive number of applications.

Good job, PCLOS team! Let's hope you'll keep up with all you've done!

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Kicking the Tires on Arch Based Antergos

We decided to take the Arch Linux based distribution Antergos out for a test drive. Here’s how it handled, out in traffic and on the track. A few months back, a fellow tech writer mentioned in an email exchange that I might try using the Arch Linux based Antergos distro as a way to grab the latest and greatest versions of popular software titles for review. Mainly because of Arch’s community repositories, in which users suggest and vote on packages to be included, many popular software titles are available within days after a new release. And since Antergos is a simple install compared to Arch, it would be easy to quickly throw up an installation on a test machine just to look at the latest and greatest from LibreOffice, GIMP and the like. Read more

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