Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Reviews

Latest Slackware Version Doesn't Cut Newbies any Slack

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Slackware is a throwback to the early days of the Linux OS, and it may not have much relevance to anyone but diehard Slackware fans. Still, experienced Linux users looking for a change of pace might enjoy setting up a Slackware system.

The documentation and user guides are fairly detailed, but they are heavy reads that will frustrate the typical new user. Those without a strong technical background will see a big disconnect in going from the live session "Slackware demo" to a functioning Slackware installation.

Read more

Arch Linux Take Your Linux Knowledge To Next Level [Review]

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

This review will be a bit unconventional, probably because Arch Linux itself is a bit unconventional. Rather than having continued, numbered releases like most distros, Arch Linux follows the rolling-release model, meaning that you install Arch once and it updates forever (or at least, until you break something). There is no “Arch Linux 16.04 LTS”, there is simply Arch Linux. The philosophy of Arch, known as The Arch Way, focuses on simplicity and user centrality, rather than user friendliness.

Read<br />
more

Elementary Loki Beta 2 shows you can improve on perfection

Filed under
Reviews

Over the past couple of years, I've made no bones about Elementary OS Freya being my go-to Linux distribution for desktops. In fact, I'd go so far as to say Elementary has become my all-time favorite Linux distribution. Why? It offers a beautiful user interface (with a completely unified design scheme) that any level of user would feel an immediate familiarity with.

That's Freya (the current stable release). At some point (there is no set release date) we'll have Loki in our hands and the improvements look to make Elementary OS something you won't want to ignore. In fact, I would argue that Elementary OS Loki could even be an ideal Linux desktop distribution for business.

Read more

Mega 50GB Free Cloud Storage Plus Linux Client

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

​Hi Guys, Today I wanna talk about a storage service that I have been using for a couple of months and I am pretty satisfied so I thought of sharing my experience with you guys. It's a Mega cloud storage that provides 50GB data for free and an official Linux client. Here is all that I have to say after using Mega in my Ubuntu Linux.

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 Review: Best New Android Phone

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Here’s what’s really confusing. All three phones have stunning 2560 x 1440-pixel resolution, AMOLED screens that absolutely blow any iPhone display out of the water. (According to the display experts at DisplayMate, the Note 7’s screen is the best smartphone screen ever.) All three also have the same super-speedy quad-core processors, water-resistant designs and superb 12-megapixel cameras.

Read more

Zenwalk Linux 8.0 - A more Zen Slackware

Filed under
Reviews
Slack

There were a few things I enjoyed about Zenwalk 8.0 and several I did not. Before getting to those, I want to acknowledge that Zenwalk is, in most ways, very much like Slackware. The two distributions are binary compatible and if you like (or dislike) one, you will probably feel the same way about the other. They're quite closely related with similar benefits and drawbacks.

On the positive side of things, I like that Zenwalk trims down the software installed by default. A full installation of Zenwalk requires about two-thirds of the disk space a full installation of Slackware consumes. This is reflected in Zenwalk's focused "one-app-per-task" approach which I feel makes it easier to find things. Zenwalk requires relatively little memory (a feature it shares with Slackware) and, with PulseAudio's plugin removed, consumes very few CPU cycles. One more feature I like about this distribution is the fact Zenwalk includes LibreOffice, a feature I missed when running pure Slackware.

On the other hand, I ran into a number of problems with Zenwalk. The dependency problems which annoyed me while running Slackware were present in Zenwalk too. To even get a working text editor I needed to have development libraries installed. To make matters worse, the user needs a text editor to enable the package manager to install development libraries. It's one of those circular problems that require the user to think outside the box (or re-install with all software packages selected).

Other issues I had were more personal. For example, I don't like window transparency or small fonts. These are easy to fix, but it got me off on the wrong foot with Zenwalk. I do want to acknowledge that while my first two days with Zenwalk were mostly spent fixing things, hunting down dependencies and tweaking the desktop to suit my tastes, things got quickly better. By the end of the week I was enjoying Zenwalk's performance, its light nature and its clean menus. I may have had more issues with Zenwalk than Slackware in the first day or so, but by the end of the week I was enjoying using Zenwalk more for my desktop computing.

For people running older computers, I feel it is worth noting Zenwalk does not offer 32-bit builds. The distribution has become 64-bit only and people who still run 32-bit machines will need to turn elsewhere, perhaps to Slackware.

In the end, I feel as though Zenwalk is a more focused flavour of Slackware. The Slackware distribution is multi-purpose, at least as suited for servers as desktops. Slackware runs on more processor architectures, has a live edition and can dump a lot of software on our hard disk. Zenwalk is more desktop focused, with fewer packages and perhaps a nicer selection of applications. The two are quite similar, but Slackware has a broader focus while Zenwalk is geared to desktop users who value performance.

Read more

Also: New Toolchain on Current

Storage Solutions - All You Need To Know

Filed under
Reviews

Being a computer user, at some point of time we all were introduced to the fear of losing our data. I know it sounds familiar because we all love our data. The data can be of many types but most importantly you would not like to know that your precious pictures have been deleted due to new operating system installation or hard drive has been damaged. In this article, I'll discuss the importance of cloud storage and different popular cloud storage that provide more free space.

Read<br />
more

OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 on my laptop

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

I am keeping OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 for sure. In general, I must say that I like the OS and, what I do not like about it is related to my very own Plasma 5 aversion instead of something particular to the OS. I mean, the OS picked up the wi-fi with no problems, the sound works, effects are working, I saw no crashes, and speed feels good. Kudos to the OpenMandriva team: their work is awesome. Of course, I must test other areas; for instance, I need to assess how the OS works with games. So, my next post will be about that, I guess.

Read more

Youker Assistant For Linux System Maintenance & Cleanup Tool

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Youker Assistant is Linux system maintenance software built by Ubuntu Kylin, an official Ubuntu subproject for chinese users. Youker assistant helps maintain system by cleaning system trash files, cache, cookies and all other histroy trace. There are couple of more built-in tools in Youker Assistant.

Read<br />
more

Linux Mint 18: Fresher Than Ever

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

There is no urgency in updating to Linux Mint 18 -- the changes it brings are subtle. However, the collection of tweaks and additions and UI improvements will give you a more pleasant computing experience.

Linux Mint 18 is a solid improvement. This distro continues to get better with age. You have nothing to lose with installing the upgrade sooner rather than later.

You have everything to gain by taking Linux mint 18 for a spin if you are not already a committed user. A few other distros offer the Cinnamon desktop, but Linux Mint has much more in its favor than Cinnamon.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux/FOSS Events

  • The Linux Foundation Announces Session Lineup for ApacheCon(TM) Europe
  • OpenShift Commons Gathering event preview
    We're just two months out from the OpenShift Commons Gathering coming up on November 7, 2016 in Seattle, Washington, co-located with KubeCon and CloudNativeCon. OpenShift Origin is a distribution of Kubernetes optimized for continuous application development and multi-tenant deployment. Origin adds developer and operations-centric tools on top of Kubernetes to enable rapid application development, easy deployment and scaling, and long-term lifecycle maintenance for small and large teams. And we're excited to say, the 1.3 GA release of OpenShift Origin, which includes Kubernetes 1.3, is out the door! Hear more about the release from Lead Architect for OpenShift Origin, Clayton Coleman.

Security News

  • Report: Linux security must be upgraded to protect future tech
    The summit was used to expose a number of flaws in Linux's design that make it increasingly unsuitable to power modern devices. Linux is the operating system that runs most of the modern world. It is behind everything from web servers and supercomputers to mobile phones. Increasingly, it's also being used to run connected Internet of Things (IoT) devices, including products like cars and intelligent robots.
  • security things in Linux v4.6
    Hector Marco-Gisbert removed a long-standing limitation to mmap ASLR on 32-bit x86, where setting an unlimited stack (e.g. “ulimit -s unlimited“) would turn off mmap ASLR (which provided a way to bypass ASLR when executing setuid processes). Given that ASLR entropy can now be controlled directly (see the v4.5 post), and that the cases where this created an actual problem are very rare, means that if a system sees collisions between unlimited stack and mmap ASLR, they can just adjust the 32-bit ASLR entropy instead.

Raspberry Pi PIXEL and More Improvements

Trainline creates open source platform to help developers deploy apps and environments in AWS