Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Reviews

Korora 26 Bloat - More is less or less is more?

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

Korora 26 Bloat is a noble concept, but it does not solve the fundamental problem it aims to solve: make Fedora usable. It tries to minimize the wreck that is Fedora 26 and fails to do so. Additionally, it introduces problems that the original did not have, making an even bigger mess.
Korora comes with a slew of ergonomics issues, flaking hardware support, too much actual bloat, tons of niggles and issues that are technically Fedora's legacy, and then the horrible Nvidia support that is just embarrassing in 2017. To answer my own question, more is less in this case, and there isn't a justifiable reason why you should prefer Korora over Fedora, nor why you should use it against the likes of Ubuntu, Kubuntu or Mint. Alas, this is not a good release, 2/10. Unusable, which is a shame, because I did like what Korora managed to do in the past. But it just shows how fragile the Linux world is. Proper distro release QA is a joke, regressions are nothing but a silent excuse to move on and churn out more bad code, almost like industrial protein, and this is so depressing I sometimes wonder why I even bother.

Anyway, to sum it up, Fedora 26 is worse than its predecessors, and Korora 26 is both worse than its own forefathers and the original article it seeks to tame, with appalling support for proprietary graphics drivers and other distros in a multi-boot setup that I really cannot recommend it. The cosmetic issues are also important, but in the end, the real deal breaker is the hardware side. Waiting for Korora 27. Peace.

Read more

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Pantheon Desktop Environment

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu

Pantheon is beautiful, lightweight, fast, simple and brings something new to Linux desktops. For Linux newbies, Pantheon is pretty straightforward and easy to use. For advanced users who prefer to tinker with their desktop, Pantheon is a no go as there is little to do in terms of customizations. Changing wallpapers and switching workspace could surely do with some simplification Nonetheless, I believe everyone who used Pantheon is going to be impressed with how beautiful this desktop environment is.

​The Pantheon desktop is definitely among the very best desktop environments. Currently, there are efforts to bring the Pantheon desktop to some major distributions such as Fedora and Arch. There is even a community version of Manjaro that comes with Pantheon. But if you really want to use this desktop go with elementary OS.

Read more

GNOME and Budgie: 2 Comfy Ubuntu 17.10 Environments

Filed under
GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

If you are looking for a change-of-pace desktop that has a modern flare and very tiny learning curve, Ubuntu's integration of both GNOME 3 and Budgie easily can fit your needs. If you want to keep using the Ubuntu family desktop line, take the other Ubuntu flavors for a spin.

Or, consider checking out the GNOME and Budgie flavors as an alternative to your current Linux distro. Canonical is a solid developer that has pioneered many innovations.

Read more

Quick Look to Uruk GNU/Linux

Filed under
Reviews

Uruk GNU/Linux is a complete, user-friendly desktop operating system with strong commitment in free software that is derived from Trisquel. Uruk 2.0 is derived from Trisquel 8 Flidas (that is still in Beta now) that is derived from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Uruk features MATE Desktop as its interface, with LibreOffice and VLC there, plus Emacs and GIMP preinstalled, and completed with Ubiquity to easily install the system. If you kindly want a 100% free distro (despite for now, it hasn't been recognized by FSF) that is user-friendly and actively developed, I wish you'll be happy with Uruk. So here's a quick look to its live session. Enjoy!

Read more

BunsenLabs Linux Deuterium review - Too much work

Filed under
Reviews

Debian base, kernel 3.X, a desktop and some apps. That's pretty much that. This is true in 90% of the cases, and the distinguishing factor is tiny, if any. But I'd like to believe there should be more, so that I can feel like I'm not just repeating same old stuff over and over without any real benefit or unique advantage. BunsenLabs Deuterium gives us a lightweight setup, it truly is that, but on any moderately decent hardware, the advantage goes away, and in its place, you get the horrible ergonomics of Openbox, which is simply not suited for any reasonable, modern work.

Hardware support is mediocre, the installation process is quirky, it's very hard to customize the desktop, network support is average, and in the end, you need to invest energy to achieve something you get out of the box with any other desktop environment. There's really no justifiable reason for that. Perhaps Deuterium will appeal to a small base of users, who want the flexibility and simplicity of Openbox, but for the vast majority of people, it's a hassle.

So much in fact that I gave up. There wasn't anything cardinally wrong with the distro. But it's like walking into a store, seeing something, and then you move on, because there was no magic. Something like 2/10. Well, maybe next time. Or perhaps a different desktop environment.

Read more

KaOS 2017.09

Filed under
Reviews

KaOS is a rolling release distribution built from scratch. It's stated aim is "to create the highest quality distribution possible". For that, it uses the Linux kernel, the KDE Plasma desktop and Arch's Pacman package manager. Interestingly, the project's website states that they are hoping to one day replace the Linux kernel with the Illumos kernel.

Read more

System76 - POP! goes my heart

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

This was far more interesting than I'd expected. One, there isn't ONE font that works uniformly well across different desktop environments, and frankly, that is a little bit disturbing. Two, Ubuntu still offers the most complete default package. Three, POP! fonts are rather nice and modern, and it seems they work the best in stock Gnome, if you're not already using something like Droid Sans.

It would seem we've chipped another facet of this multi-dimensional monster called Linux Fonts, as it feels just impossible to nail down the simple, elegant formula for maximum ergonomics, productivity and fun. You have to ride the licensing, anti-aliasing and hinting shuttles all at the same time, and they seem to be going in different directions. Ubuntu is way ahead of the rest, and this is why the System76 experiment will be rather intriguing. I want to see how the complete package will behave. You should test and see how you feel about Roboto Slab and Fira. My hunch says, Gnome great, Ubuntu, not so much. But we will see. And of course, we shall be testing the distro, so stay tuned.

Read more

ArchLabs Makes Up for Parabola's Curve Balls

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

ArchLabs Linux was a very happy discovery. It did a lot to change my impression of Arch Linux. It especially made up for the problems Parabola Linux posed.

I found that the Archlabs distro was an excellent Linux OS option to install on several very old laptops from the post Windows XP era. I have gotten far too comfortable using resource-intensive distros on my newer desktops and laptops. Archlabs Linux is a fun and effective alternative.

Read more

ArchLabs Makes Up for Parabola's Curve Balls

Filed under
Reviews

If you want to stretch your Linux desktop acumen from the Debian Linux lineage to Arch Linux, Archlabs might be a better choice than Parabola.

Arch Linux is something of a black sheep when it comes to installing and configuring a Linux distribution. It presents a few more stumbling blocks than other Linux options, which could make it a less welcome alternative to some users. Arch Linux distros are notorious for their intense installations and sometimes-challenging software management processes.

Distros based on Arch Linux usually are not good choices for newcomers to the Linux operating system. Users need a better handle on how Arch Linux works to use Arch-based distros successfully. Considerable background reading is necessary for things to make sense with minimal frustration.

I have offered that cautionary advice numerous times in reviews of less-well-known Linux products, and recent experiences prompted it once again. I discovered two seemingly worthy distros that provided an opportunity to revisit the trials and tribulations of working with Arch Linux derivatives.

Read more

Managing virtual environments with ClonOS 12

Filed under
Reviews

ClonOS is one of the latest operating systems to be entered into the DistroWatch database. The project's website describes ClonOS as follows:

ClonOS is a free, open-source FreeBSD-based platform for virtual environment creation and management.

The operating system uses FreeBSD's development branch (12.0-CURRENT) as its base. ClonOS uses ZFS as the default file system and includes web-based administration tools for managing virtual machines and jails. The project's website also mentions the availability of templates for quickly setting up new containers and web-based VNC access to jails. Puppet, we are told, can be used for configuration management.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KDE: Introduction to Kdenlive, Qt 3D Aspect, Mini Bug Squashing Day

  • A Brief Introduction to Kdenlive
    Kdenlive has become one of the main free software tools for audio-visual editing. Although complaints about earlier versions continue to dog its reputation — especially about syncing — the latest releases soon make clear that Kdenlive is now a mature and reliable tool. However, one thing it lacks is a general overview that helps new users navigate its complexity. Admittedly, the information users need is available. Yet finding it when you need it can be time-consuming, and add to the difficulties of learning a new application. Having just completed my first video — “Preparing Labels in LibreOffice” for WorldLabel — I think I have learned enough of the basics that my next effort should go far more efficiently. As a guide to myself, and to anyone else who might be starting to use Kdenlive, I present the following in the hopes of saving everyone some time and distraction.
  • Writing a Custom Qt 3D Aspect – part 1
    Qt 3D has a flexible and extensible architecture that allows us to easily add our own new functionality to it without disrupting the existing features.
  • Mini Bug Squashing Day
    In preparation for the 17.12 release we will be holding a mini bug squashing day on the 1st of December, between 10:00 and 15:30 (CET time). Community members are invited to submit their bug suggestions. For developers interested in contributing to the project we have a set up a list of low hanging bugs for them to cherry pick and get acquainted with the code base. Note that this is a great opportunity for prospective participants in the Season of KDE.

Xubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark - The winter is ... meh

I must say I'm a bit sad. Xubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark is nowhere near as good as its predecessor. It comes with a slew of bugs and regressions inherited from Ubuntu without any validations or checks. The experience is flawed, with middling hardware support, although the rest of the stack is quite reasonable. You get blazing performance, good looks, and decent overall out-of-the-box experience with media and gadgets. However, that on its own means nothing - because when you compare to Zingy Zorba, this is a release that does everything slightly less well, and it comes with problems and issues we did not have before. Do we really need these hope-killing releases that undo all that's gone before? Xubuntu was really doing well, and then, wham, regressions. Seriously? Why? Anyway, 6/10. Worth testing - better than Ubuntu or Kubuntu of the autumn stock, but still not as good as what we've seen, known and love. Take care, fellow Tuxians. Read more

today's howtos

Linux 4.14.2, 4.13.16, 4.9.65, 4.4.101, 4.4.102, and 3.18.84