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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Android x86 - Release 4.4 r3

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Android
Reviews

This review might not be very long but I have spent a long time playing and experimenting with Android x86 and if you stick with it and are willing to play with settings then you may get something close to desirable.

Those who will get the most out of Android x86 will be using a computer with a touchscreen.

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BackBox 4.3 review: Not just for penetration tests and security assessments

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Reviews
Ubuntu

BackBox is a Linux distribution that’s based on Ubuntu and designed for conducting “penetration tests and security assessments”.

If you’re not familiar with the distribution, this brief review will give you an idea what else it can be used for other than being an OS for pentesters.

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POLL - 5 Best Linux Desktop Environments With Pros & Cons

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Linux
Reviews


favorite linux desktop environment

I am sure all of you remember the 7/7/2015 post 5 Best Linux Desktop Environments With Pros & Cons. We all discussed the post in the comments and I really appreciate that LinuxAndUbuntu readers took part in discussion, mentioned their favorite(s) DE and also took poll. Today I'm going to reveal the poll taken by our readers and also the most liked DE in Comments.

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Linux Mint 17.2: tried and tested is never bested

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Reviews

When I booted into Linux Mint, I immediately saw how mature and smooth the distribution was. It was a breeze to open files, switch between windows and even type, with a GUI which didn’t look like it was designed in the 1990s. The high level of theme customisability and the gorgeous wallpaper selection enthralled me, and impressed me enough to make it the sole operating system on my old laptop.

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Android auto review: A beautiful, but beta alternative to awful OEM solutions

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Android
Reviews

Infotainment systems are actually the worst part of a modern car. In fact, a study by Nielsen and SBD Consultancy found the systems in new cars to be the biggest cause of customer complaints. Much like during the beginnings of the modern smartphone, the car infotainment trend takes a bunch of manufacturers that traditionally have only made hardware and asks them to create software. It should be no surprise that they are terrible at it. (And that says nothing of their typical sloth-ish product cycles.)

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Android TV Review: Just What Your TV Doesn't Need

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Android
Reviews

The latest Android-based smart TV platform – cunningly called Android TV – is by my reckoning Google’s third stab at becoming a force to be reckoned with in the smart TV world. Actually its fourth if you also include the early and little-seen Android 4.2 Jelly Bean effort introduced on a few high-end Philips TVs in a handful of European territories last year.

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The New Solus: Putting the Pieces Together Again The New Solus

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OS
Reviews

Perhaps what is the most significant trinket in Solus is the desktop creation built into it from scratch. The developer created the Budgie Desktop as a new Linux environment written from the ground up. Budgie has grown from its inception in SolusOS through Evolve OS. Designed with the modern user in mind, Budgie focuses on simplicity and elegance. It has a plain and clean style. It is easy to use.

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HP ProBook 455 Ubuntu review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

For basic office tasks, the ProBook 455 Ubuntu isn't a bad desktop replacement, and Ubuntu has made big strides from niche project to a rounded OS that most people will adapt to comfortably.
Nonetheless, every one of this laptop's strengths seems to be countered by some related weakness. It's spacious and filled with ports, but clunky and heavy. Its operating system is feature-rich, but buggy. It's secure for now, but won't be in two years' time.

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Black Lab Linux Xfce 15.7 is out now. Distro Review and Installation Guide

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Linux
Reviews
HowTos

Black Lab Linux is all about power; it is a complete operating system and should work perfectly fine for all kind of Linux lovers. It is lightweight, boot time is pretty impressive, user interface is charming and working of the operating system is quick. Try it out now, our verdict; you will not be disappointed.

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Emmabuntus 3: take it all

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Reviews

Emmabuntus 3 boots in to a standard Xfce screen with an Emmabuntus-themed wallpaper and a toolbar at the top. There is a menu button in the top left corner and several icons in the notification area in the top right corner: network, battery and volume indicators, as well as date, time and username.

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Servers: Containers, 'Cloud', Microservices, and Hyperledger

  • How to Choose a Linux Container Image
    A comparison of Linux container images talks about the best-practices in choosing an image. Architecture, security and performance are among the factors, while commercial users would also look for support options. A Linux container allows separate management of kernel space and user space components by utilizing cgroups and namespaces, which are resource and process isolation mechanisms. Solaris and BSD also have abstractions similar to Linux containers but the article's focus is on the latter only. The host running the container has the operating system kernel and a set of libraries and tools required to run containers. The container image, on the other hand, has the libraries, interpreters and application code required to run the application that is being distributed in the container. These depend on underlying system libraries. This is true for interpreted languages too as the interpreters themselves are written in low level languages.
  • The Four Pillars of Cloud-Native Operations
    As organizations shift their application strategies to embrace the cloud-native world, the purpose of the cloud transitions from saving money to delivering and managing applications. Platforms such as Cloud Foundry, Kubernetes, and Docker redefine the possibilities for application environments that utilize the cloud. It’s time for us as operations professionals to rethink how we approach our jobs in this new world. We should be asking, how do our organizations take advantage of cloud-native as a new mode of application delivery?
  • How to align your team around microservices
    Microservices have been a focus across the open source world for several years now. Although open source technologies such as Docker, Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Swarm make it easier than ever for organizations to adopt microservice architectures, getting your team on the same page about microservices remains a difficult challenge. For a profession that stresses the importance of naming things well, we've done ourselves a disservice with microservices. The problem is that that there is nothing inherently "micro" about microservices. Some can be small, but size is relative and there's no standard measurement unit across organizations. A "small" service at one company might be 1 million lines of code, but far fewer at another organization.
  • Hyperledger Stitches in Another Blockchain Project
    The Linux Foundation’s open source Hyperledger Project, which works on blockchain technologies, added a sixth sub project — this one dubbed Quilt. Hyperledger Quilt started around 18 months ago and is an implementation of the Interledger Protocol (ILP), which helps facilitate transactions across ledgers.
  • Chinese Search Giant Baidu Joins Hyperledger Blockchain Consortium
    Chinese search engine giant Baidu has become the latest member of the Linux Foundation-led Hyperledger blockchain consortium. In joining the group – which focuses on developing blockchain technologies for enterprises – Baidu will assist the project's efforts alongside other member companies including Accenture, IBM, JP Morgan, R3, Cisco and SAP, among others.

Games: Steam Sale, Skirmish Line, Maia, Observer

Canonical on Path to IPO as Ubuntu Unity Linux Desktop Gets Ditched

In October 2010, Mark Shuttleworth, founder of the Ubuntu open-source operating system and CEO of Canonical, announced his grand plan to build a converged Linux desktop that would work on mobile devices, desktops and even TVs. He called the effort "Unity" and poured significant financial resources into it. Seven years later, the Unity dream is dead. On Oct. 19, Ubuntu 17.10 was released as the first Ubuntu Linux version since 2010 that didn't use Unity as the default Linux desktop. In a video interview with eWEEK, Shuttleworth details the rationale behind his decision to cancel Unity and why he has now put his company on the path toward an initial public offering (IPO). Because Ubuntu has moved into the mainstream in a bunch of areas, including the cloud, he said some of the things his company had been doing were never going to be commercially sustainable. Read more Also: Ubuntu 17.10 delivers new desktop and cloud enhancements

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