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Reviews

The Strangest, Most Unique Linux Distros

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Reviews

From the most consumer focused distros like Ubuntu, Fedora, Mint or elementary OS to the more obscure, minimal and enterprise focused ones such as Slackware, Arch Linux or RHEL, I thought I've seen them all. Couldn't have been any further from the truth. Linux eco-system is very diverse. There's one for everyone. Let's discuss the weird and wacky world of niche Linux distros that represents the true diversity of open platforms.

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Cinnamon: Not all Sugar and Spice

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Reviews

Recently, I have installed and tested Linux Mint 17.2, and found it quite adorable. One of the major improvements the distribution brings to the proverbial Penguin table is a set of stylistic and functional changes to its settings menu, including the way you manage themes, icons, extensions, and the rest of the desktop bits and pieces. All of that, in a review, coming soon. But that’s only one side of the story.

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Linux Mint 17.2 KDE: do you have the hardware?

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KDE
Reviews

Linux Mint 17.2 KDE felt solid and responsive to me, apart from one occurrence that I mentioned above.

It is based on a solid distribution and adds some useful features like necessary codecs.

KDE always had its fans for the convenience, high level of integration and the ease of navigation. On the flipside, KDE is usually considered a Desktop Environment for high-performance hardware.

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Ubuntu phone in South Africa: Aquaris E5 HD unboxing

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Reviews
Ubuntu

BQ recently launched its Ubuntu global store, which sells and ships the Aquaris E5 HD and Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu smartphones to countries like South Africa.

While you are required to pay in Euros, no shipping fees or taxes are levied at checkout. You must just pay the relevant duties and taxes over to SARS when the device lands in South Africa.

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A review of every Android phone from the past, present, and future

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Android
Reviews

If you read a lot of Android phone reviews, you've probably started to see the patterns between them. By carefully analyzing these patterns and running them through highly accurate formulas, I've been able to determine what every Android phone review ever written will say. Don't wait around for next year's model. Its review is already here:

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Exploring a different direction with VectorLinux 7.1

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Often times, when we look out over the sea of Linux distributions, we see a lot of Debian based projects, dozens of Ubuntu spins and a healthy collection of Fedora derivatives. It seems to me that distributions based on Slackware are sighted less and less these days. Maybe Slackware's traditional style just does not appeal to new distribution creators or maybe the distribution's conservative nature has become a liability in today's environment of fast paced development. Whatever the reason, VectorLinux 7.1 (a Slackware derivative) was launched back in June and I, hungry for a taste of Slackware, happily added it to my list of projects to review.

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HP Probook 455 G2 Ubuntu review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The HP Probook 455 G2 with Ubuntu is very affordable, but even without the expense of Windows it feels a little cheap and lacks polish in various places from the hardware to Ubuntu itself. It’s by no means bad, but unless you specifically need Linux then a good Chromebook would be a better value and better designed Windows alternative – as long as you’re happy to work exclusively in the cloud.

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Atom 1.0.7 Released, Text Editor Made For Developers

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Linux
News
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Picture

A text editor is always the best friend of any developer. Every developer passes most of his/her time programming with text editor. So that text editor has to be unique and friendly at the same time. Then I rememberAtom, one of the most handy text editors. The latest version Atom 1.0.7 released recently with some tweaks into find & replace.  
 

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August Nexus 5 Android 5.1.1 Update Review

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Android
Reviews

We’ve been spending some quality time with Google’s latest Nexus 5 Android 5.1.1 update and today, we want to take a look at how its performance is holding up as we move away from its release date. This is our review of the August Nexus 5 Android 5.1.1 update.

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A Brief Review of Q4OS Linux

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Q4OS Linux is based on Debian Wheezy so it is similar to AntiX in this regard. If you like KDE 3.5.10 then you'll like Trinity 3.5.13.2 which is what Q4OS uses.

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Leftovers: OSS

  • The FCC Builds Open-Source Video Calling For The Deaf
    The FCC has gotten behind a new platform that helps the deaf talk to each other over video link. The idea of Accessible Communications for Everyone, or ACE as it’s being called, is that it lets all kinds of different apps talk to each other. It’s kind of how you can email anyone without worrying what app they use, only for video, and text and audio, all together.
  • Why Intel made Stephen Hawking's speech system open source
  • NodeConf EU all set for blarney in 'Nodeland'
    It's NodeConf EU time again -- the third annual gathering of what is hoped to be 400 of the top influencers in Node.js at Waterford Castle from September 6th to 9th.
  • 3 steps for planning a successful open source meetup
  • Starting in September, Chrome will stop auto-playing Flash ads
    Google has announced that, beginning September 1, Chrome will no longer auto-play Flash-based ads in the company's popular AdWords program
  • Apache Software Foundation Makes Lens, a Big Data Tool, a Top Level Project
    Whenever the Apache Software Foundation graduates an open source project to become a Top Level Project, it tends to bode well for the project. Just look at what's happened with Apache Spark, for example. Now, the Foundation (ASF), which is the steward for and incubates more than 350 Open Source projects, has announced that Apache Lens, an open source Big Data and analytics tool, has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP).
  • Intel Pumps OpenStack Up
  • LibreOffice 5.0.1 released, to keep the momentum going
  • First Update to LibreOffice 5 Lands
    The Document Foundation today announced the first update to the milestone LibreOffice 5.0 released a few weeks ago. This is a bug fix release bringing over 75 commits since version 5.0 was unveiled August 5. It is recommended that those using the 5.0 branch upgrade their LibO installs with today's update.
  • Salesforce Aura ventures into open source -- to a point
    Salesforce's splashy new UI, the Lightning Experience, is more than a pretty face. It was built with Aura, the company's open source UI framework, available for use independent from Salesforce's services. With Lightning -- and Aura -- Salesforce emphasizes how users can design applications that not only look great, but plug into more than Salesforce. Where, then, does Salesforce's open source offering end with Aura, and where do its own services begin?
  • Infosys talks open source, cloud and value
    Last year, when Infosys hired Abdul Razack to own the company’s platform division, he came with a mandate to use open source first. Eleven months on and Infosys Information Platform (IIP) is flourishing with 120 projects on the go, some proofs of concept, many moving to production, but with open source at their heart in most situations.
  • Eclipse Foundation Moving to Donations to Support Open Source Projects
  • Intel invests $60 million in drone venture
    Intel is investing $60 million in UAV firm Yuneec, whose prosumer “Typhoon” drones use Android-based controllers. Intel Corp. CEO Brian Krzanich and Yuneec International CEO Tian Yu took to YouTube to announce an Intel investment of more than $60 million in the Hong Kong based company to help develop drone technology. No more details were provided except for Krzanich’s claim that “We’ve got drones on our road map that are going to truly change the world and revolutionize the industry.” One possibility is that Intel plans to equip the drones with its RealSense 3D cameras (see farther below).
  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: August 28 [Ed: out fo date now]
    Join the FSF and friends every Friday to help improve the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones.
  • What Will Become of the World’s First Open Source GPU?
    Dr. Karu Sankaralingam, who led the team’s effort at the University of Wisconsin, where the project is based, says that building an open source or any other hardware project is bound to incur legal wrangling, in part because the IP almost has to be reused in one form or another. Generally, he says that for open source hardware projects like this one, the best defense is to use anything existing as a base but focus innovation on building on top of that. He says that to date, AMD has not been involved in the project beyond a few individuals offering some insight on various architectural elements. In other words, if the team is able to roll this beyond research and into any kind of volume, AMD will likely have words.

Security Leftovers

  • Friday's security updates
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • nsenter gains SELinux support
    nsenter is a program that allows you to run program with namespaces of other processes
  • Iceland boosts ICT security measures, shares policy
    Iceland aims to shore up the security of its ICT infrastructure by raising awareness and increasing resilience. And next to updating its legislation, Iceland will also bolster the police’s capabilities to tackle cybercrime.
  • A Project to Guarantee Better Security for Open-Source Projects
    Open-source developers, however, can take steps to help catch these vulnerabilities before software is released. Secure development practices can catch many issues before they become full-blown problems. But, how can you tell which open-source projects are following these practices? The Core Infrastructure Initiative has launched a new "Best Practice Badge Program" this week to provide a solution by awarding digital badges to open-source projects that are developed using secure development practices.

Hortonworks and NSA