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Reviews

Mega 50GB Free Cloud Storage Plus Linux Client

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Linux
Reviews

​Hi Guys, Today I wanna talk about a storage service that I have been using for a couple of months and I am pretty satisfied so I thought of sharing my experience with you guys. It's a Mega cloud storage that provides 50GB data for free and an official Linux client. Here is all that I have to say after using Mega in my Ubuntu Linux.

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 Review: Best New Android Phone

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Android
Reviews

Here’s what’s really confusing. All three phones have stunning 2560 x 1440-pixel resolution, AMOLED screens that absolutely blow any iPhone display out of the water. (According to the display experts at DisplayMate, the Note 7’s screen is the best smartphone screen ever.) All three also have the same super-speedy quad-core processors, water-resistant designs and superb 12-megapixel cameras.

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Zenwalk Linux 8.0 - A more Zen Slackware

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Reviews
Slack

There were a few things I enjoyed about Zenwalk 8.0 and several I did not. Before getting to those, I want to acknowledge that Zenwalk is, in most ways, very much like Slackware. The two distributions are binary compatible and if you like (or dislike) one, you will probably feel the same way about the other. They're quite closely related with similar benefits and drawbacks.

On the positive side of things, I like that Zenwalk trims down the software installed by default. A full installation of Zenwalk requires about two-thirds of the disk space a full installation of Slackware consumes. This is reflected in Zenwalk's focused "one-app-per-task" approach which I feel makes it easier to find things. Zenwalk requires relatively little memory (a feature it shares with Slackware) and, with PulseAudio's plugin removed, consumes very few CPU cycles. One more feature I like about this distribution is the fact Zenwalk includes LibreOffice, a feature I missed when running pure Slackware.

On the other hand, I ran into a number of problems with Zenwalk. The dependency problems which annoyed me while running Slackware were present in Zenwalk too. To even get a working text editor I needed to have development libraries installed. To make matters worse, the user needs a text editor to enable the package manager to install development libraries. It's one of those circular problems that require the user to think outside the box (or re-install with all software packages selected).

Other issues I had were more personal. For example, I don't like window transparency or small fonts. These are easy to fix, but it got me off on the wrong foot with Zenwalk. I do want to acknowledge that while my first two days with Zenwalk were mostly spent fixing things, hunting down dependencies and tweaking the desktop to suit my tastes, things got quickly better. By the end of the week I was enjoying Zenwalk's performance, its light nature and its clean menus. I may have had more issues with Zenwalk than Slackware in the first day or so, but by the end of the week I was enjoying using Zenwalk more for my desktop computing.

For people running older computers, I feel it is worth noting Zenwalk does not offer 32-bit builds. The distribution has become 64-bit only and people who still run 32-bit machines will need to turn elsewhere, perhaps to Slackware.

In the end, I feel as though Zenwalk is a more focused flavour of Slackware. The Slackware distribution is multi-purpose, at least as suited for servers as desktops. Slackware runs on more processor architectures, has a live edition and can dump a lot of software on our hard disk. Zenwalk is more desktop focused, with fewer packages and perhaps a nicer selection of applications. The two are quite similar, but Slackware has a broader focus while Zenwalk is geared to desktop users who value performance.

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Also: New Toolchain on Current

Storage Solutions - All You Need To Know

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Reviews

Being a computer user, at some point of time we all were introduced to the fear of losing our data. I know it sounds familiar because we all love our data. The data can be of many types but most importantly you would not like to know that your precious pictures have been deleted due to new operating system installation or hard drive has been damaged. In this article, I'll discuss the importance of cloud storage and different popular cloud storage that provide more free space.

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OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 on my laptop

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MDV
Reviews

I am keeping OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 for sure. In general, I must say that I like the OS and, what I do not like about it is related to my very own Plasma 5 aversion instead of something particular to the OS. I mean, the OS picked up the wi-fi with no problems, the sound works, effects are working, I saw no crashes, and speed feels good. Kudos to the OpenMandriva team: their work is awesome. Of course, I must test other areas; for instance, I need to assess how the OS works with games. So, my next post will be about that, I guess.

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Youker Assistant For Linux System Maintenance & Cleanup Tool

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Linux
Reviews

Youker Assistant is Linux system maintenance software built by Ubuntu Kylin, an official Ubuntu subproject for chinese users. Youker assistant helps maintain system by cleaning system trash files, cache, cookies and all other histroy trace. There are couple of more built-in tools in Youker Assistant.

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Linux Mint 18: Fresher Than Ever

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Linux
Reviews

There is no urgency in updating to Linux Mint 18 -- the changes it brings are subtle. However, the collection of tweaks and additions and UI improvements will give you a more pleasant computing experience.

Linux Mint 18 is a solid improvement. This distro continues to get better with age. You have nothing to lose with installing the upgrade sooner rather than later.

You have everything to gain by taking Linux mint 18 for a spin if you are not already a committed user. A few other distros offer the Cinnamon desktop, but Linux Mint has much more in its favor than Cinnamon.

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Trying two new distributions

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Reviews

I recently decided to do something different and, instead of reviewing one of the distributions in the DistroWatch database, I opted to select two projects at random from the waiting list. I was not sure what I would get when I spun the virtual roulette wheel, but I was eager to try something new.

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Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Review

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Linux
Reviews

Now it has been approximately a month since I'm using Linux Mint 18 "Sarah". There is not doubt this distro is solid and newbie friendly. I always suggest Linux newbies start with Linux Mint as it makes easier for them to move around and learn Linux system. Sarah takes the same legacy forward with better look and user experience.

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Bodhi Linux review

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Linux
Reviews

These are just few reasons to think about Bodhi Linux. As it is based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS it doesn't lacks in case of applications. There is an alpha release of Bodhi Linux which is based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. This gives us another reason to think about Bodhi Linux. Try it out and make it permanent if you like it. In our next segment we will be introducing an independent Linux distribution. So stay tuned with us and don't forget to have fun with Linux.

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