Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Reviews

Review On Ubuntu Budgie 17.04: Newest Ubuntu Flavor

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Budgie is a new desktop interface built from scratch which focuses on simplicity and elegance. It is developed by the Solus team. It uses GNOME technologies beside their own modifications to give a better user experience.

Ubuntu Budgie is an Ubuntu-based distribution which uses Budgie desktop interface as its default. It’s an official Ubuntu flavor. Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 was the first release of this distribution, which was released 3 days ago.

We downloaded the new distribution and played with it for a while to see what it has. This was our experience. TL;DR: Generally so good, nothing so special to see, but there are some small glitches.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 review

Tiny Core: Small Footprint, Big Potential

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Tiny Core comes in a few architectures. It is available for ARM, x86 and x86_64 processors.

Tiny Core Linux may not have all the bells and whistles you get from a more functional Linux distro. However, if you prefer telling your OS what to do rather than the other way around, Tiny Core Linux could be an interesting alternative for you.

I was impressed with Tiny Core's speed and simplicity. It is a Linux variant that can let you work without desktop distractions. It is also a handy and tiny OS very suitable for tinkering. It is an ideal OS option to familiarize users with a hefty collection of lightweight classic desktop environments.

Read more

Galaxy S8 and S8+ review: Another pair of excellent mainstream smartphones from Samsung

Filed under
Android
Reviews

When you talk about Samsung's Galaxy smartphones, it's hard not to talk about 'the average consumer.' Because the Galaxy S series is the second-most popular line of smartphones on earth, its audience is unashamedly mainstream, and the vast majority of sales of these devices will be to consumers who aren't what you'd call tech-savvy. The issue for Samsung, increasingly, is learning how to split the difference between a smartphone that provides a good experience for everybody and maintaining that all important credibility with its fans and enthusiasts.

Read more

Latte Dock – An anchor for your Plasma stuff?

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

Calling Latte Dock a replacement for traditional panels in Plasma is like calling scooters a replacement for the car. Each has its own merits, and by such it shalt be judged. Specifically, Latte Dock comes with a lot of interesting features, plus a slew of bugs, which are expected for something in the sub-1.0 version era. Luckily, there do not seem to be any cardinal problem. Aesthetic, intuitive, no deal breakers.

No deal sweeteners either. That is THE problem. Overall, Latte works, but it does not have any real advantage over the classic panel, or even other dock solutions out there. Not enough to oust the old guard. After all, there’s a reason why the menu + bar formula has been around for so long. It’s simple and it works. Latte needs an extra shot of awesome if it wants to succeed. To be followed and re-tested.

Read more

Also: Calligra 3.0.1 update released

I have seen the future of Ubuntu: Ubuntu Gnome 17.04 review

Filed under
Reviews

Canonical’s announcement to ditch Unity and move back to Gnome Stack and Gnome Shell has put Ubuntu Gnome in the spotlight. Canonical won’t have to do any work in ‘going back to Gnome’ because Ubuntu Gnome has done all the needed legwork.

Jeremy Bicha, an Ubuntu Gnome developer, wrote in a blog post that “the development teams from both Ubuntu GNOME and Ubuntu Desktop will be merging resources and focusing on a single combined release, that provides the best of both GNOME and Ubuntu. We are currently liaising with the Canonical teams on how this will work out and more details will be announced in due course as we work out the specifics.”

Read more

GNU/Linux Review: Xubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus

Filed under
Reviews

Please welcome Xubuntu 17.04, a newly released GNU/Linux OS with very low memory consumption and pretty desktop interface. It ships with XFCE 4.12, Firefox 52, and LibreOffice 5.3. It consumes only around 330MB of RAM at idle time, very convenient for low-end and old computers. It provides complete and large number of software on official repository, a big win for powerful computers for serious purposes. Xubuntu 17.04 is released at same day as Ubuntu 17.04, April 13th 2017. And this is a review to introduce you how great Xubuntu 17.04 is.

Read more

Maui Linux 17.03

Filed under
Reviews

On the whole I enjoyed using Maui, more than I had expected. There was not any one feature or program which really stood out as amazing, but I liked the overall style of the distribution. Maui provides a lot of software and features out of the box, offers a stable core based on an Ubuntu LTS release and includes cutting edge KDE Plasma software. I like that the application menu is full of useful software while avoiding overlap in functionality. I also appreciate how easy it is to use the Calamares installer and how quickly Calamares sets up the operating system. Mostly, I like that the distribution provides distinct windows, large fonts and a high-contrast theme which I found easy to look at over longer periods.

I ran into just two issues or concerns while using Maui. One was the performance of the desktop with its default settings in the virtual test environment. Maui performed well on my desktop computer, but Plasma was slow to respond when running in VirtualBox. It is possible to improve performance by adjusting some items in the System Settings panel, but it would have been nice if the desktop had defaulted to more efficient settings.

My second issue was not a bug, but rather a matter of style. Maui has a friendly look, lots of simple configuration modules and, over all, a very modern and easy to use approach. Everything looks new and tasks are typically performed through slick, graphical wrappers. The one exception I found was Synaptic. The venerable package manager works well, but is a bit cryptic compared to most modern software managers. I like Synaptic for its speed and flexibility, but I think something like GNOME Software or mintInstall might be more in line with Maui's newcomer-friendly approach.

On the whole, I like Maui. The distribution is easy to set up, friendly and generally stayed out of my way while I was working. This seems like a fairly beginner friendly desktop distribution which does a good job of making things easy without distracting the user or doing too much hand holding.

Read more

GNU/Linux Review: Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

This is a review of Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus with both Unity 7 and 8 desktop environments. This release is beautiful as always, ready for serious use, and complete with more than 70000 packages on official repository. It will be supported for 9 months until January 2018. Finally, I hope this review helps people to find how Ubuntu is and what's interesting from 17.04. Enjoy!

Read more

Q4OS 1.8.3 Orion review - Bayeux distro

Filed under
Reviews

Q4OS is like an ancient tapestry. Beautiful, stylish, iconic, but then, also fraying at the seams. The initial impression is mighty. You can't argue that. I was amazed by the virtual machine setup, and loved the live session even on the LG laptop. But then, the more I used it, the more I started seeing problems.

Orion does some things exceptionally well - it's friendly, it's designed to assist newbs in getting underway, it has a calm presence, and it's very frugal. But the hardware side of things is mediocre. First, no boot on UEFI. Then, no smartphone or Bluetooth support. Wonky suspend & resume. Moreover, customization is weak, UI has some rather rusty spots, and the multimedia front can benefit from improvement. The worst part is, prehistoric bugs linger, souring the experience.

All in all, Q4OS 1.8.3 Orion is the kind of desktop that got worse the more I used it, rather than better. Eventually, I settled in and enjoyed most of the experience, but there's a lot missing that most people take for granted. Curiously, it does some things exceptionally well, especially where some other distros struggle. But the balance isn't worth it. At the end of the day, TDE isn't the promised desktop and Q4OS isn't the promised distro. Good, but a lot more effort is needed to nail that professional feel. If you have an old laptop, you should definitely give it a try, just remember that the Ghost of KDE3.5 may come to haunt you. 5.5-6/10.

Read more

Welcome Ubuntu Budgie 17.04: A Short Review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Budgie begins its debut as official Ubuntu family in 17.04 "Zesty Zapus" release. It's a new choice of flavors with new desktop environment (Budgie) as operating system for us. Ubuntu Budgie is crafted purely for desktop use, no tablet-like interface (like Unity or GNOME), thanks to Budgie DE. So I want to introduce Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 to beginners especially if they're new to GNU/Linux. I hope you'll enjoy Ubuntu Budgie starting from this review.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

QNX 7 Can Be Fitted With A Qt5 Desktop

  • QNX 7 Can Be Fitted With A Qt5 Desktop
    While QNX remains targeted as an operating system for mobile/embedded solutions, a BlackBerry developer in his spare time has fitted QNX 7 with a Qt5 desktop. QNX 6 and prior had a desktop option, but was removed in QNX 7, which was released this past March. QNX 7.0 also brought support for 64-bit (and maintaining 32-bit) Intel x86 and ARM platforms along with C++14 support. For those wanting to experiment with QNX 7, a BlackBerry kernel developer has been working on making this operating system more desktop friendly.
  • Building a BlackBerry QNX 7 Desktop
    Having Qt allowed me to port one of my favourite applications, SpeedCrunch. It was a simple matter of running ‘qmake’ followed by ‘make’. Next, I ported the QTermWidget library so that I could have terminal windows.

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Kernel explained
  • [Older] [Video] Audio on Linux: The End of a Golden Age?
  • State of Sway April 2017
    Development on Sway continues. I thought we would have slowed down a lot more by now, but every release still comes with new features - Sway 0.12 added redshift support and binary space partitioning layouts. Sway 0.13.0 is coming soon and includes, among other things, nvidia proprietary driver support. We already have some interesting features slated for Sway 0.14.0, too! Today Sway has 21,446 lines of C (and 4,261 lines of header files) written by 81 authors across 2,263 commits. These were written through 653 pull requests and 529 issues. Sway packages are available today in the official repos of pretty much every distribution except for Debian derivatives, and a PPA is available for those guys.

Supporting Burning Platforms

  • Surface revenue does a U-boat, and dives

    Revenue generated by Microsoft's Surface hardware during the March quarter was down 26% from the same period the year before, the company said yesterday as it briefed Wall Street.

    For the quarter, Surface produced $831 million, some $285 million less than the March quarter of 2016, for the largest year-over-year dollar decline ever.

  • Acer said to me: "do not use our products with Linux. Find another manufacturer"
    Last year, I bought an Acer notebook and it came with Windows 10. As I didn't want spyware neither bloatware, I got Linux installed and asked for a refund of the OEM license. After a little of talking, they were wanting to charge me US$100 (to remove the license, which I already had wiped, as I got FDE Linux installed) to refund US$70 of the OEM license. This year, wondering to buy a new Acer notebook, I asked them again if they would refund me the OEM license without all the hassle (as they did pay me the US$70, without me having to pay the US$100).

today's howtos