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Reviews

Review: Pyabr OS

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Reviews

Pyabr OS was one of the latest distributions to be added to the DistroWatch waiting list. The project refers to itself as a "Python Cloud Operating System", a Linux distribution mostly written in Python. The project, which declares it is developed in Iran with multilingual support, runs on x86_64 computers and 64-bit Raspberry Pi machines.

The project's website mentions that Pyabr is a platform written in Python which offers a desktop and applications which can be run on any Linux distribution while Pyabr OS is a Debian-based operating system that runs the Pyabr software. The operating system can reportedly be installed locally or run from live media like a thumb drive. The desktop environment resembles KDE Plasma but is a custom environment called Baran which the project says is written in Python using the Qt framework.

I was unsure going into this trial how all of this related to cloud computing or services. The term "cloud" gets thrown around on the project's website, but without a clear indication of how this affects the end user. I decided to give the project a test drive and see if I could find out.

The Pyabr OS ISO file is a small download of just 447MB. The live system always stalled early in the boot process for 90 seconds while waiting for systemd to sort out its infamous "A start job is running..." warning. After that, the distribution booted quickly and displayed the Baran desktop which does look a lot like KDE Plasma at first glance due to its shared Qt framework and theme.

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elementary OS 6 Odin Review - Beautiful and Empowering

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OS
Reviews

It's a review of elementary OS 6, codenamed Odin, a computer operating system that proudly released with the slogan Thoughtful, capable, and ethical replacement to Windows and MacOS that's now empowering modern laptops that ship worldwide. Let's see OS 6 through this review.

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KDE neon 5.22.5 - When you come undone

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KDE
Reviews

This is a short review, yes, yes, it is. But, we learned something. KDE neon is really fast. KDE neon is pretty. KDE neon 5.22.5 also brings in regressions, which I find super-annoying. We're talking the titlebar theming, we're talking network manager, we're talking scaling issues, yet again. Steam? Yup, that's another, entirely unnecessary hurdle for the common user.

On their own, these problems wouldn't be an issue. Except, toss a D&D 20-sided cube, and you get your random damage points, and that's about as arbitrary as issues that keep coming back into an otherwise solid and fun distro. I know that KDE neon is a test bed, but the User Edition is meant to be stable and robust enough. Overall, I am happy, but this wasn't the best Plasma experience. In fact, I'm on a jinx ride. Two out of two for a less than satisfactory outcome. Now, I need to cry. The end.

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Review: Getting started with Ansible

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Reviews

Ansible is a Red Hat owned tool for automating system administration tasks. It is typically used in environments where an administrator wants to perform the same task, such as deploying security updates, on many computers without logging into each computer manually. Unlike many automation tools, Ansible does not require any special software to be installed on each client machine. Each client just needs the OpenSSH service to be installed on the clients and all the work and configuration is handled by one central server.

There are a lot of reasons for working with Ansible and this guide is meant to get you up and running quickly. If you're like me, I have a terrible habit of not reading the fine manual. To quote the Simpsons character Renier Wolfcastle, "I was elected to lead not to read". To follow along with this tutorial here are the basics you will need...

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Fedora 35 bridges the gap between the seasoned and the new user

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Red Hat
Reviews

For the longest time, I considered the Fedora Linux distribution to have an audience of one—those dyed-in-the-wool, experienced users. There's a good reason for that. Fedora is a bleeding-edge distribution, so things can break, go south or not work.

I've been reviewing Linux distributions for decades now, so I've experienced several Fedora releases. When this particular flavor of Linux first hit the virtual shelves, it was very much not a platform for the new user. It would break and require admin-level attention.

But something happened along the way to number 35. Fedora became really solid. This was partially bolstered with the help of the rock-solid GNOME desktop. And even with Fedora including the newest versions of GNOME didn't seem to cause the operating system to falter.

To borrow a cliché, it all just works.

However, it does more than just work. I'd go so far as to say that the last few Fedora releases have worked exceptionally well, as well as any other desktop distribution. And Fedora 35 is no exception to this new rule.

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Free Software Review: GNOME Web 3.38.2 on Debian GNU/Linux 11. A worthy replacement for your current browser?

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GNOME
Reviews
Web

With so many web browsers out there to pick from, many of them really aren’t very different from each other, and few take the time to work like the other applications on your desktop.

In Windows, nobody notices this because none of the applications (even from Microsoft) or system settings menus are consistent. They duplicate functionality, have different GUI conventions, and the entire thing is a usability hell. GNOME tries to be a bit “cleaner” than this.

In Windows 11, in fact, Microsoft tried to steal from Chrome OS, GNOME, and the Mac’s “clean” interface design, but reverted to form and immediately crapped it up with the usual junk and ads and trialware, and a store that nobody wanted to use to begin with because there’s still time to repeat that disaster again.

But the point, here, is that GNOME (and to a lesser extent) KDE for various *nix operating systems (they’re portable), try not to confound the user and present them with a giant headache of pointlessness and redundancy and bugs. Which is nice.

That’s where GNOME Web comes in. The development name is Epiphany, because that was the application’s original name, when it started as a project to build a web browser around the Mozilla rendering engine, Gecko. In the late 2000s, Mozilla decided to make it difficult to use their engine in anything but Firefox, forcing the GNOME Web developers to go a different way.

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Also: This change in Google Chrome 94 will make you switch to Firefox - itsfoss.net

Fedora 34 KDE - Modern but not polished

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KDE
Red Hat
Reviews

As you can imagine, I didn't really continue with my test. Therefore, no data on battery life, resource usage, or any of the customizations that I often have to undertake to my systems usable and productive. What would be the point really? So many things went wrong. Some of these aren't Fedora's fault, but many others are.

Slow boot time (and boot menu oddities), Wayland scaling problems, crashes, lack of third-party application by default. Fedora 34 KDE just does not feel complete. It's a distro all right, but it sure doesn't get as much love and attention as the flagship release. Not that that guarantees quality in the distrospace really, anywhere. All in all, if you want Plasma bleeding edge, Manjaro or neon can do that just as well, while providing their own share of quirks and bugs (albeit smaller). There are some small redeeming points in Fedora 34 KDE, but they are nowhere near enough to compensate for the bad stuff. All in all, sadly, my past impression holds. Oh well.

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Review: Martine OS 2.0 and Airyx 0.2.2

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OS
Reviews

I did not spend a lot of time with Airyx, just a few days. Mostly this was due to the operating system not playing well with my wireless card, an issue most flavours of BSD run into. However, while my experience was brief, I will say that I see the appeal of Airyx (and by extension helloSystem). For people who like the macOS style desktop, this experience should make people feel at home. The unified application menu on the top panel, the icons, the utility and settings panels, and the overall theme all share a strong similarity with macOS.

The system installer is quite simple and can be navigated with a few mouse clicks so the barrier to entry is relatively low, assuming your computer has at least 4GB of memory for the live media. The operating system, even running ZFS, is quite light in memory and includes some standard open source tools.

There were two weak points I encountered. The first was hardware support, which is often a problem I run into with flavours of BSD. Wireless and suspend support in particular tend to be missing. The other issue was the lack of a fully functioning package manager. I'm not sure why pkg has been hobbled in Airyx, but the fact it still refreshes repository information and installs packages from FreeBSD suggests to me that the limitation is unnecessary.

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Pinebook Pro Review: A FOSS Laptop That Doesn't Suck

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Pinebook's Linux-only approach to hardware development makes an attractive proposition for those wanting the all-FOSS experience. But how does its Pinebook Pro laptop stack up against more established opposition, such as the much-loved Chromebook?

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CutefishOS: Unix-y development model? Check. macOS aesthetic? Check (if you like that sort of thing)

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OS
Reviews

One of the reasons Linux has never caught on as a desktop operating system, as Linux fans know, is that Linux isn't a desktop operating system, it's a kernel. And assembling it into a coherent package users can install is the job of a distribution.

This is a very different distribution model than the one Apple or Microsoft uses, and it confuses newcomers. Windows and macOS are easier to understand, they are single things made by single companies. Canonical and Red Hat notwithstanding, Linux is not packaged and presented this way at all. I've long believed that this difference is one of the key stumbling blocks to wider Linux adoption.

Apple has macOS, Microsoft has Windows, Linux has... hundreds of awkward, confusingly named options.

This is both Linux's greatest strength, and its greatest weakness. For those who already understand and use it the options are welcome. I've been a Linux user for over a decade and I've used several dozen distros, some of them so different from one another it's difficult to believe they're built from the same base. This wealth of options is great, but it's both confusing and overwhelming for new users.

Distributions like elementary OS are popular with people switching from macOS and Windows because elementary OS offers that same highly polished, all-in-one package that makes the transition from proprietary operating systems smoother. But this is Linux, so you can't just have elementary OS.

The latest distro to catch my eye is CutefishOS, which owes considerable design debt to both elementaryOS and the operating system made by that fruit company.

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mesa 21.3.0-rc3

Hello everyone, The third release candidate is now available, containing again mostly zink fixes, and a handful of patches for everything else. Please test it and report any issue here: https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/mesa/mesa/-/issues/new Issues that should block the release of 21.3.0 should be added to the corresponding milestone: https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/mesa/mesa/-/milestones/27 Cheers, Eric Read more Also: Mesa 21.3-rc3 Released With Many Zink OpenGL-On-Vulkan Fixes

today's leftovers

  • Disney+ streams to Linux-based VIDAA Smart OS

    Disney+, a world-renowned streaming application, and VIDAA, a Linux-based smart TV operating system, announced that Disney+ will be coming soon to VIDAA Smart OS-powered Hisense and Toshiba smart televisions, with the latest firmware version.

  • Router Freedom at risk: Latvia allows restrictions to consumers' rights

    Latvia's reform of the telecom law weakens Router Freedom in the country. The national regulator, SPRK, has allowed ISPs to restrict the use of personal routers on the grounds of "technological necessity". We explain why this is problematic and what impact it can have for end-users' rights. Router Freedom is the right end-users have to choose and use their own modems and routers to connect to the Internet. Since 2020, European countries have been in a process of implementing this right within a reform of EU telecommunications law. In this context, Latvia has created a risky precedent against end-users' rights by allowing internet service providers (ISPs) to determine restrictions on the use of personal routers and modems based on "technological necessities". The FSFE has engaged with the Latvian regulator, SPRK, to stress the necessity to change the law as it represents a big loss for consumer rights.

  • Virtual Conferences: a love-hate relationship

    I love conferences. Now, that most conferences are either virtual or hybrid (both virtual and on-premises), people often say that it must be heaven for me. I can visit many more conferences and give many more talks. Well, it is not just this simple. Virtual conferences are a love-hate relationship for me. Of course, there are some advantages, but also disadvantages.

  • Add Mycelium To Your Mesh Networks

    In many parts of the world, days after a good rainfall, it’s fairly common to see various species of mushrooms popping up out of the ground. These mysterious organisms aren’t the whole story, though. The living being is a vast network of hidden fibers, called mycelium, spreading through the ground and into any other organic material it can colonize. Its air of mystery and its vast reach are the inspiration for entire Star Trek shows and, of course, projects like this LoRa-based mesh network called Mycelium.

  • Sparky 6.1 RC1 ARMHF

    Sparky 6.1 Release Candidate 1 ARMHF for single board machines RaspberryPi is out. It is based on Debian Bullseye packages and build using the pi-gen script. The system works on Linux kernel 5.10.63 and is available, as before, in two versions: – Openbox – with small set of applications – CLI – text mode only to do it yourself user: pi, password: sparky root user password: toor

  • Bluez 5.62 compiled in OpenEmbedded

    EasyOS 3.1 has package bluez5 version 5.54. There have been improvements since then, so I have compiled 5.62 in OE.

  • I’m livestreaming Kalendar development!

    Today (Wednesday 27th Oct) at 18:00 CEST I will be streaming some Kalendar development live on YouTube and on KDE’s Peertube instance.

Release announcement: Trisquel 9.0.1 Etiona security update

Images are available at https://trisquel.info/download or directly at https://cdimage.trisquel.info/ and its mirrors. This minor update to the 9.x "Etiona" series is intended to provide an up to date set of ISO images, both for use as an installation medium and as a live environment with newer packages. Read more

today's howtos

  • Anticipating Your Memory Needs - Further learnings
  • bkr job status
  • What packages are Needed to build the Kernel | Adam Young’s Web Log

    In my quest to automate the testing of the Linux Kernel, I need to automate the build of the Linux Kernel. To build the Kernel, you need the requisite packages. What are they? Let’s find out. I am staring with a Baremetal Fedora Image. It has 344 packages installed already. I’m going to assume that this set is available when I do my automated build as well, or that the needed packages will get pulled in by dependencies. If not, I will find out when my automation fails to run and I will add them at that point. Most Fedora and CentOS based documents on building the Kernel have you do a group install of the “Development Tools” yum package group. I don’t want to do this for two reasons. First, I want to use the beaker format which just lists the packages in the job description. Second, I want to minimize the non-required packages, and Development Tools is general purpose group for coding; not everyone needs everythingm, and I don’t want to put non-essential packages on the system.

  • Yaru-colors: Give Ubuntu folders a colourful Touch - Linux Shout

    We have a default theme Yaru on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and in other recent versions of Ubuntu Linux, to give a new feel we can change the accent color of this default theme using Yaru-colors. Well, there are lots of customized themes available to install & apply on Ubuntu, however, what if you don’t want to change the default look of your Linux. I mean the one your getting via Yaru. But still need some new touch & feel on your system. Then try out Yaru-Colors, it will be the visual theme (style of widgets, colors, icons, and GNOME Shell) for official them Yaru of Ubuntu. It is increasingly polished and closely follows the line marked by GNOME. However, not everyone likes the combination and, changing the right thing, Yaru Color is an ideal complement to get away from the characteristic orange, but keep the essence of the distribution.

  • Android 9 on Linux | Linux.org

    Many people would sometimes like to have access to Android. In this article, I will cover the steps to install Android 9 on a Virtual Box machine. Having access to Android on your system can make it easier for accessing apps that are only available on Android.

  • How to install the latest version of Minetest on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install the latest version of Minetest on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How Can You Install Google Browser on Debian?

    Google Chrome is a widely used web browser in the world. Google Chrome is fast and secure as well. However, it is not an open-source web browser. Hence, Debian comes with a pre-loaded Chromium browser, and not a Chrome. Chromium is an open-source browser. If you still want to install the Google Chrome browser on Linux, this article is for you. Installing Chrome on Linux has a little twist as it’s not an open-source browser. So let’s check out how you can easily install Chrome browser from a Linux terminal.

  • How to Install and Set Up PM2 on Linux Servers

    Deployment is one of the most crucial and conclusive stages of software development. A proper deployment strategy is vital in delivering the best experience to your users while utilizing your services efficiently. However, this process also brings its own set of challenges with it. Node.js, the open-source JavaScript runtime, is a popular choice for building the backend infrastructure of your application by allowing you to run JavaScript outside web browsers. But what if your Node.js application crashes in production? Find out how you can avoid such scenarios in this article.

  • Create and assign Users to Oracle Databases - Unixcop

    Hi There ! In this write up, we will discuss about how to create & assign users to the oracle DB As always, begin by connecting to your server where Oracle is hosted, then connect to Oracle itself as the SYSTEM account. The SYSTEM account is one of a handful of predefined administrative accounts generated automatically when Oracle is installed. SYSTEM is capable of most administrative tasks, but the task we’re particularly interested in is account management.

  • How to Start Weblogic Admin and Node Manager without password - Unixcop

    After installing Oracle Weblogic, it’s necessary to give username & password every time it’s prompt. It’s sometime a hassle, for some extent, we don’t want to provide username & password every time. Hello guys ! Today we will learn, how to start the weblogic Admin Server & Node Manager without providing username & password every time. While starting the Admin Server (or) Managed Servers for the first time after the domain creation you must have been prompted for the username and password, In order to handle it, there is a task we need to do.

  • How to install OpenTTD on Elementary OS 6.0 - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at how to install OpenTTD on Elementary OS 6.0.

  • How to reset weblogic Admin user Password - Unixcop

    Hi there ! In today’s write up, we will get to know, how to reset the weblogic console/admin password in case you forgot that. This might be a shot article. If you want to learn more about weblogic, please refer to my previous tutorial about instllation & configuration weblogic 14c server on centos 8 from here https://unixcop.com/oracle-weblogic-14c-on-centos-8/ To reset the password, we first need to go the weblogic domain home.

  • How to Create database on Oracle Database - Unixcop

    SQL statement is a more manual approach to creating a database than using Oracle Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA). One advantage of using this statement over using DBCA is that you can create databases from within scripts. Hi guys ! In this write up, we will learn, how to create database on oracle database using the manual approach (CMD) When you use the CREATE DATABASE statement, you must complete additional actions before you have an operational database. These actions include building views on the data dictionary tables and installing standard PL/SQL packages. You perform these actions by running the supplied scripts. To Create the database, we have to work through step by step, we will discuss about these below. Seat tight and hold your breath !

  • Automate SAP HANA System Replication in Cluster on IBM Power Virtual Servers in One Hour [Ed: SUSE's Web site has become too focused on selling SAP instead or promoting Free software]
  • How to install Go (Golang) in Arch Linux/Manjaro – Citizix

    This tutorial will help you install Go(Golang) on a Manjaro/Arch Linux system. This guide can also work for other Linux systems like Debian or Ubuntu or Redhat based systems. Go is a statically typed, compiled programming language designed at Google by Robert Griesemer, Rob Pike, and Ken Thompson. It’s has always been said to be an easy language for developers to learn quickly. Golang is very useful for writing light-weight microservices, infrastructure like networked servers and also tools and systems for developers. It can alsobe used for generating APIs that interact with front-end applications. If you want to build a small functional microservice quickly, then Golang is a great tool to use.

  • Give Ubuntu Folders a Colorful Makeup with Yaru-Colors

    Yaru-Colors is a theme project to bring different colors to Ubuntu’s Yaru theme. Here’s how to install it. Yaru is the default theme for Ubuntu, backed by the community. It is the user interface theme that has been used in Ubuntu since 18.10. The name “Yaru” follows the Japanese influence on Ubuntu’s theme naming and it means “to do.” But what is theme? In short, a theme is what determines the colors, borders, shadows, size, and shape of individual elements on the screen.