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Reviews

Review: BlackBerry's keyboard not enough to make it stand out in Android pack

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Android
Reviews

BlackBerry, the longtime device maker that helped pioneer the smartphone market but is now struggling to stay relevant, has done what previously might have been considered unthinkable.

Earlier this month, BlackBerry released a phone called the Priv that runs not on one of the company's own, home-brewed operating systems, but on Google's Android. The new phone has a BlackBerry keyboard and some of the company's software, but it looks and works like an Android device.

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Review: Ubuntu GNOME 15.10 is what vanilla Ubuntu should be

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Reviews
Ubuntu

But… that's a bit of a problem. Since Ubuntu is so laser-sight focused on their in-house developed Unity environment, other environments simply don't work as well. I experienced multiple problems trying to run GNOME on vanilla Ubuntu 15.10 – and had similar issues with KDE Plasma.

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Review: 5 memory debuggers for Linux coding

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Linux
Reviews

As a programmer, I'm aware that I tend to make mistakes -- and why not? Even programmers are human. Some errors are detected during code compilation, while others get caught during software testing. However, a category of error exists that usually does not get detected at either of these stages and that may cause the software to behave unexpectedly -- or worse, terminate prematurely.

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Refined player: Fedora 23's workin' it like Monday morning

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Red Hat
Reviews

Like its predecessor, this Fedora comes in three base configurations – Workstation, Server and Cloud. The former is the desktop release and the primary basis for my testing, though I also tested out the Server release this time around.

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Ubuntu 15.10 review: Wily Werewolf leaves scary experimentation for next year

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Reviews
Ubuntu

If you want a desktop that's reliable, solid, but also pushing things forward—which is to say, if you want the experience Unity has been providing for the last three or even four releases—you will likely want to get the 16.04 LTS release coming next April. It will probably be the last Unity 7 release. But if you want to live on the edge, Unity 8 will be, if not the default, at least only a login screen away come this time next year.

In the meantime, enjoy your quiet days of Ubuntu 15.10. The days of such calm releases are limited.

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Ubuntu GNOME: the typical part of the family

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GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

If you like GNOME3, you will find that Ubuntu GNOME 15.10 is a good and reliable system for you. Apart from small performance issues in the browser, I had nothing major to report in the "problems" area.

Basically, as soon as you say "Ubuntu", you are already in the area of well-tested and problem-free all-rounders, especially if the distribution is officially supported by Canonical, the company behind this family of Linux operating systems. Any part of that family is the tool that you can start using out of the box, adding necessary components as and when they are necessary. For the most of us, the choice between the parts of the family is merely a choice of visual design of components and workflows.

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Fedora 23 Xfce review

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Red Hat
Reviews

A default installation of Fedora desktop has a very good security profile: FirewallD and SELinux, an application firewall, are active. So if you configure full disk encryption, your Fedora-powered machine should have a pretty good physical and network security posture. One tool that should have been installed, is the firewall-applet, a component of FirewallD that resides in the systray. Figure 15 shows the entries in the applet’s menu after installing it on my test system.

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Kubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf - Pretty useless

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KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

I heard there's been a change of management with the Kubuntu community or some sort like that. Well, perhaps it's for the greater good. I am quite close to abandoning Kubuntu forever. Much like PCLinuxOS, it's slowly creeping toward irrelevance, offering none of the love and fire that you'd want and expect. It's exhausted, it's defeated. It just doesn't try to win you in any way. It's there because it exists. Nothing more.

Moreover, there's the matter of inconsistency. I mentioned this before, and I will mention it again. I absolutely loathe when things break in between releases. Small, simple things. Like Samba or printing or codecs. Why? WHY? WHY! How difficult is it to try to offer a sane, steady user experience? Why do I have to dread every single update? You can never really know. One version, things work, and then they don't. Samba sharing. Year 2015. How difficult can it be to copy files from one frigging computer to another without problems? It's not like sending probes to Mars. Just a bloody copy operation, source destination. Simple.

On top of that, Kubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf literally fails in every aspect. It's totally useless, it's buggy, it's crashy, and it offers nothing that would make it even remotely interesting. Nothing useful or practical about it really. Nothing. I'm sad. And angry. Avoid at all costs. 0/10. Bye bye now.

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Leaping in a new direction with openSUSE 42.1

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Reviews
SUSE

Of the three distributions, I think Fedora is closest to the cutting edge, with openSUSE and Ubuntu both fairly close behind. However, Fedora and Ubuntu have relatively short support cycles with Fedora releases usually supported for about 14 months, Ubuntu 15.10 for just nine months and openSUSE 42.1 will receive three years of support.

The best distribution for the job will depend on the person and, of course, the role the distribution is to play. I think Fedora is aimed mostly at more technical users and people who like to tinker. Ubuntu is aimed squarely at Linux newcomers who generally want to just use their computer and openSUSE appears to be aiming at a sort of middle ground: people who have a little Linux experience and want options, but also want reliability and longer support cycles.

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    If you've been reading the news lately, you may have heard rumors that Docker founders hired the developer of Alpine Linux, a small, text-based distribution, to move the official Docker images away from the Ubuntu infrastructure.
  • More Android Vendors Said To Be Eyeing Ubuntu Phones This Year
    A greater number of Android smartphone/tablet vendors are said to be eyeing Ubuntu Phone for new devices later this year. In an interview published this morning by The Register, Canonical CEO Jane Silber talked about their communications with more (unnamed) Android vendors and supposedly seeing some other vendors offering Ubuntu Phone products later in 2016.