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Reviews

Google Pixel C review: the best Android tablet is a viable iPad competitor

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Android
Google
Reviews

The Pixel C is Google’s first own-brand tablet, designed and made via China by Google and is the best Android tablet available at the moment.

The Pixel C joins the Chromebook Pixel - the first piece of hardware designed solely by Google - but instead of running Chrome OS the Pixel C runs the latest version of Android 6.0 Marshmallow, making it the first tablet to do so.

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Casio WSD-F10 Android Wear smartwatch hands-on review

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Android
Reviews

Don’t let the dreary name fool you - Casio’s new Android Wear smartwatch is definitely worth getting excited about, especially if you’re the type of person who loves nothing more than wading through wild streams and gutting spear-caught salmon.

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Android Marshmallow Review: The Best Mobile Platform

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Android
Reviews

Google delivers another EPIC update in the form of Android Marshmallow, a truly huge and awesome platform for phones and tablets

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UGet 2.0.4 Released, One Of The Lightest Download Managers For Linux

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Linux
News
Reviews

uGet is a free and Open-Source download manager for Linux. It's light and small but supports most important feautres that a good download manager should have. uGet recently released uget 2.0.4. You can easily install this simple yet powerful download manager on your Linux system.

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KDE Plasma 5.5: The Quintessential 2016 Review

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KDE
Reviews

It's the start of 2016 and over the past year KDE developers have brought numerous new features and improvements to the Plasma 5 desktop, some tangible with others more under-the-hood.

With the sun set on 2015 it marks the first full year since Plasma 4, a stable workhorse which many users still rely on for day-to-day computing, has been discontinued. Plasma 5 is on the clock for users who need to know if the widgets, settings, and some painful regressions have been sorted out to see if it's safe to embrace modern Plasma in the new year.

This review will cover the evolution of KDE Plasma and its applications since the release of 5.2, listing many of the biggest differences and examining if they have caught up with Plasma 4 to a satisfactory degree for everyday users looking for a supported daily driver. We will also look at the desktop from the viewpoint of users who are thinking of trying or returning to the KDE/Plasma ecosystem, and may not necessarily know about some of the core Plasma functionality.

While I have avoided bias to the best of my ability, for full disclosure I am a member of the KDE Visual Design Group.

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Also KDE:

FreeFileSync 7.8 Has Been Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Or Other Derivatives Distros

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Linux
News
Reviews

FreeFileSync is an Open-Source and cross platform tool to compare and sync files and folders. It's a very useful tool as you can compare two folders at different locations with FreeFileSync. You can update two folders and updation will copy all the new files from one folder (source folder) to another (target folder). It is helpful in taking backup of your important folders at a different location in different folders, such as in USB, Network, or internally.

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Nvidia Shield Android TV review: Linux conquers the living room

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Android
Reviews

Google has been trying to get into our living rooms for quite some time. As much as they dominate search, mobile phones, and now are making a serious dent in the PC space with Chrome OS, they have been virtually missing from our living rooms, losing out to the likes of Roku and Apple TV.

In 2010 the company launched Google TV, which turned out to be a massive disappointment and Google ultimately killed the platform. In 2013, Google released Chromecast, which revolutionized the market for digital media players. And in 2014 the company announced Android TV at its Google I/O event.

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Elementary OS' Freya Dumbs Down Linux

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Reviews

The release last month of Elementary OS Freya version 0.3.2 showed little has changed in this new-style Linux distro that wraps its own lightweight desktop design around the Ubuntu core.

Elementary OS first appeared in 2011. I last looked at its Freya beta release in 2014. I liked its fresh, new look and simplified approach to desktop management. However, my hopes for more features and a faster-evolving desktop environment in the latest release went unfulfilled.

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System 76 Oryx Pro review: A laptop for your desk

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Linux
Reviews

In 2013 when I moved to the U.S. from Europe, I need a new laptop. My powerful desktop PC was on some ship due to arrive in 2-3 months. (Linux users will know how hard it can be to find a decent laptop that can run Linux without any issues.) I finally settled on a Macbook Pro that I have been using as my main laptop ever since.

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Google Pixel C Android Tablet: Australian Review

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Android
Google
Reviews

Android tablets don’t get much love these days. Team them with a good keyboard and they’re useful for basic productivity tasks, as proven by our time with the Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 and Sony Xperia Z4 Tablet. And beyond that they’re still great for playing games, reading books, watching TV shows and listening to music like any other Android device. But hey’re just a little less cool than iPads. And a little less useful than laptops.

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Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • OpenSSL patches two high-severity flaws
    OpenSSL has released versions 1.0.2h and 1.0.1t of its open source cryptographic library, fixing multiple security vulnerabilities that can lead to traffic being decrypted, denial-of-service attacks, and arbitrary code execution. One of the high-severity vulnerabilities is actually a hybrid of two low-risk bugs and can cause OpenSSL to crash.
  • Linux Foundation Advances Security Efforts via Badging Program
    The Linux Foundation Core Infrastructure Initiative's badging program matures, as the first projects to achieve security badges are announced.
  • Linux Foundation tackles open source security with new badge program
  • WordPress Plugin ‘Ninja Forms’ Security Vulnerability
    FOSS Force has just learned from Wordfence, a security company that focuses on the open source WordPress content management platform, that a popular plugin used by over 500,000 sites, Ninja Forms, contains serious security vulnerabilities.
  • Preparing Your Network for the IoT Revolution
    While there is no denying that IP-based connectivity continues to become more and more pervasive, this is not a fundamentally new thing. What is new is the target audience is changing and connectivity is becoming much more personal. It’s no longer limited to high end technology consumers (watches and drones) but rather, it is showing up in nearly everything from children’s toys to kitchen appliances (yes again) and media devices. The purchasers of these new technology-enabled products are far from security experts, or even security aware. Their primary purchasing requirements are ease of use.
  • regarding embargoes
    Yesterday I jumped the gun committing some patches to LibreSSL. We receive advance copies of the advisory and patches so that when the new OpenSSL ships, we’re ready to ship as well. Between the time we receive advance notice and the public release, we’re supposed to keep this information confidential. This is the embargo. During the embargo time we get patches lined up and a source tree for each cvs branch in a precommit state. Then we wait with our fingers on the trigger. What happened yesterday was I woke up to a couple OpenBSD developers talking about the EBCDIC CVE. Oh, it’s public already? Check the OpenSSL git repo and sure enough, there are a bunch of commits for embargoed issues. Pull the trigger! Pull the trigger! Launch the missiles! Alas, we didn’t look closely enough at the exact issues fixed and had missed the fact that only low severity issues had been made public. The high severity issues were still secret. We were too hasty.
  • Medical Equipment Crashes During Heart Procedure Because of Antivirus Scan [Ed: Windows]
    A critical medical equipment crashed during a heart procedure due to a timely scan triggered by the antivirus software installed on the PC to which the said device was sending data for logging and monitoring.
  • Hotel sector faces cybercrime surge as data breaches start to bite
    Since 2014, things have become a lot more serious with a cross section of mostly US hotels suffering major breaches during Point-of-Sale (POS) terminals. Panda Security lists a string of attacks on big brands including on Trump Hotels, Hilton Worldwide, Hyatt, Starwood, Rosen Hotels & Resorts as well two separate attacks on hotel management outfit White Lodging and another on non-US hotel Mandarin Oriental.

Android Leftovers

today's howtos