Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Reviews

BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

THE BQ AQUARIS M10 is the first Ubuntu-powered tablet and Canonical's attempt to bring its Linux-based operating system to the masses.

It's also the first tablet to offer a fully converged experience, according to Canonical, as the BQ Aquaris M10 can transform from a tablet to a fully-fledged PC.

Ubuntu OS can change from a touch-based to a desktop interface via an HDMI connection, trumping Microsoft's Continuum feature in Windows 10 on paper at least, and apps switch from full-screen to floating windows that can be resized and moved around.

Read more

Calculate Linux 15.17

Filed under
Reviews

Xubuntu Xenial Xerus - Triple X - The spy who failed me

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu

Before you read this conclusion, please do me a favor. Please read my review of Vivid, then go back up, find the links to the Werewolf review and the best distro of 2015 summary, and then read those, too. Then, come back to this piece here. Now, please try to explain, in human lingo, how it is possible than only one year apart, we get such a huge, drastic difference in the distro behavior.

Xubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus is meant to be the rock-solid LTS, beautiful and elegant and majestic. It is none of that. There are so many bugs and problems it really turns me off the whole Linux thing. I feel like an idiot for doing these reviews, for wasting hundreds and thousands of hours of my life trying to promote a cause and technology that ultimately just ends up failing randomly, because people can't be bothered to invest time in proper QA rather than pointless, arbitrary release dates and silly changes that serve no purpose.

Not good. Not good at all. Realtek issues, mouse going away after waking from sleep, login niggles, package management woes, sucky Bluetooth stack, Thunar hiccups, Samba crap. This is just a short list of everything that's wrong with Xenial, and then, to make it even worse, the Unity and the Xfce versions can't really agree on the suck list. They all have their own unique problems, and there's no consistency. I'm just pissed off. April 2016 was meant to be a happy, cheerful month. Now, I'm facing total destruction and distros that barely work. And yes, please, skip to the very end, and tell me how it's all my fault. Anyhow, Xubuntu Xerus gets only 3/10. Do not upgrade for now.

Read more

Also: Xubuntu 16.04 - install and enjoy?

BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu tablet - Convergence in action

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Being able to use your smartphone as a desktop has a lot of allure to lots of people. Phones and tablets are all nice and dandy, but due to evolutionary factors explained in a related article, they are not really useful for anything but passive enjoyment of content. You simply cannot get the same type and/or amount of speed, efficiency, productivity, and multi-tasking like you can on a keyboard-and-mouse device. Plus money.

But what if you could transform your touch device into a would-be desktop? Sounds good, and this is what Convergence is. Dubbed various names and titles, this element of the M10 Ubuntu tablet sounds like an excellent selling point. I've already given you a review of what the hardware and the operating system can do, but we did not dwell on the desktop-like usage. We will do that now.

Read more

BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition review: A rocky start to a new era

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Let me be clear. In reviewing the Aquaris M10, I was very aware that I was reviewing not just the device but the Ubuntu mobile platform. In fact, the review is less about the device than about where Ubuntu stands now in the tablet space and the potential and possibilities the future holds.

Ubuntu mobile is a very promising platform; it just needs some constructive feedback so that developers can improve the user experience. I consider this tablet something similar to Google Glass: a prototype that gives you a glimpse of what to expect from Ubuntu on tablets.

Read more

Solus OS Review

Filed under
Reviews

When it comes to Linux distributions, conventional wisdom says that an operating system is only as good as the packages that are available. Why? Well, software matters! Who wants to use an operating system when it’s not possible to install Google Chrome, Steam, Skype and 100 other applications? Solus OS developers, that’s who.

Solus OS is a new Linux operating system that isn’t based on anything. It’s a fresh take on Linux with a message: less is more. No hassling with settings or choices. Everything is taken care of for you ahead of time.

Read more

Forked Debian Beta Is Rough Around the Edges

Filed under
Reviews
Debian

You can get the Devuan Jessie beta download and all installers.

The Xfce desktop is a perfectly fine environment. In combination with the installed base, Xfce worked fine with the Devuan beta release.

More polish and growth of the Jessie version is needed, however, before Devuan can succeed as an independent Linux distro in its own right. Until then, the beta and what may follow are an interesting footnote in yet another Linux family line.

Read more

An Everyday Linux User Review Of Ubuntu 16.04 - The Good, The Bad And The Not Quite So Ugly

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The Good

The developers do appear to listen to their users. Everything that people have asked for in the past few years has been implemented in one way or another.

The Bad

This is a long term support release and it feels like it isn't quite ready. I find it hard to believe that nobody working on Ubuntu tried a clean install, followed by installing some of the more popular applications like Chrome, Dropbox and Steam.

The Not Quite So Ugly

The Software Centre has gone.

This would have been great as a point release, say a 16.10 or a 17.04 because you expect some experimentation and you expect the odd cock-up.

The LTS release should be ready to go from day one with only minor issues. Sadly that isn't the case.

Read more

FreeBSD 10.3's new features

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

FreeBSD is a venerable operating system, often deployed on servers due to the project's focus on performance and stability. At the beginning of April the FreeBSD project released version 10.3 of their operating system. The release announcement for FreeBSD 10.3 mentioned several features and improvements which caught my attention. Specifically the availability of ZFS boot environments, 64-bit Linux compatibility and jail improvements were of interest to me. I was especially eager to try out FreeBSD's new jails technology using the iocage front-end. The iocage software has been presented as an improvement on (and replacement for) Warden, a friendly front-end for handling jail environments.

I already reviewed FreeBSD 10.0 when it was launched and so I plan to skip over most aspects of the new 10.3 release and focus on the key features I listed above, along with the notable changes I encounter. The new release is available in many different builds, ranging from x86 and ARM, to SPARC and PowerPC. For the purposes of my trial I downloaded the 2.6GB DVD image of FreeBSD's 64-bit x86 edition.

Read more

First impressions of FreeBSD 10.0

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

The BSD family of operating systems is typically reputed to be conservative, stable and dependable. FreeBSD typically embodies these characteristics quite well, showcasing reliability and offering few surprises. That being said, the latest release of FreeBSD, version 10.0, introduced a few important changes which I felt deserved a look. Some of the new features shipping with FreeBSD 10.0 included support for ZFS on the root file system, TRIM and LZ4 compression support for ZFS, virtualization improvements and a new package manager. The latest version also swaps out the venerable GNU compiler for the Clang compiler on supported architectures. The 10.0 release is available for several architectures, including x86, Power PC and Sparc. I was interested in the x86 releases which can be downloaded in 32-bit or 64-bit builds. We can further narrow our selection by downloading either a CD-sized ISO or a 2.2 GB ISO image. I opted to try the larger image for my trial.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

BeagleBone Black Wireless SBC taps Octavo SiP, has open design

BeagleBoard.org’s “BeagleBone Black Wireless” SBC uses Octavo’s OSD335x SiP module and replaces the standard BeagleBone Black’s Ethernet with 2.4GHz WiFi and BT 4.1 BLE. BeagleBone Black Wireless is the first SBC to incorporate the Octavo Systems OSD335x SiP (system-in-package) module, “which integrates BeagleBone functionality into one easy-to-use BGA package,” according to BeagleBoard.org. Announced on Sep. 26, the OSD3358 SiP integrates a TI Sitara AM3358 SoC along with a TI TPS65217C PMIC, TI TL5209 LDO (low-drop-out) regulator, up to 1GB of DDR3 RAM, and over 140 passives devices including resistors, capacitors, and inductors, within a single BGA package. The Linux-driven hacker SBC also adds TI WiLink 8 WL1835MOD wireless module with 2.2 MIMO. Read more Also: Epiq Solutions' Sidekiq M.2 NAS-targeted Skylake Mini-ITX loads up on SATA, GbE, PCIe

Android Leftovers

  • 6 open source fitness apps for Android
    A key part of developing a good fitness routine is creating a solid workout plan and tracking your progress. Mobile apps can help by providing readily accessible programs specifically designed to support the user's fitness goals. In a world of fitness wearable devices like FitBit, there are plenty of proprietary apps designed to work with those specific devices. These apps certainly provide a lot of detailed tracking information, but they are not open source, and as such, do not necessarily respect the user's privacy and freedom to use their own data as they wish. The alternative is to use open source fitness apps. Below, I take a look at six open source fitness apps for Android. Most of them do not provide super detailed collection of health data, but they do provide a focused user experience, giving the user the tools to support their workouts or develop a plan and track their progress. All these apps are available from the F-Droid repository and are all licensed under the GPLv3, providing an experience that respects the user's freedom.
  • Roku Express, Roku Premiere, and Roku Ultra announced, starting at $29.99
    Roku Inc, maker of the popular Roku line of home media players, has just refreshed their entire product lineup at once. The existing lineup of flagship Roku boxes (but not the Roku Streaming Stick) has been replaced by three new products (with upgraded models for each); the Roku Express, the Roku Premiere, and the Roku Ultra.
  • This is what the Chromecast Ultra will look like
    Google is ramping up for their major October 4th event. In addition to seeing the Pixel and the Pixel XL formally unveiled, we’re also expecting a new Chromebook and the Chromecast Ultra. Until today, we had no idea what to really expect from the new Chromecast device in terms of design, but now we’re finally getting a sneak peek.
  • Android + Chrome = Andromeda; merged OS reportedly coming to the Pixel 3
    It has been almost a year since The Wall Street Journal dropped a bomb of a scoop on the Android community, saying Chrome OS would be "folded into" Android. The resulting product would reportedly bring Android to laptops and desktops. According to the paper, the internal effort to merge these two OSes had been underway for "roughly two years" (now three years) with a release planned for 2017 and an "early version" to show things off in 2016. It seems like we're still on that schedule, and now Android Police claims to have details on the new operating system—and its first launch device—coming Q3 2017.

Fedora 26 Linux OS to Ship with OpenSSL 1.1.0 by Default for Better Security

Fedora Program Manager Jan Kurik informs the Fedora Linux community about a new system-wide change for the upcoming Fedora 26 operating system, namely the addition of the OpenSSL 1.1.0 libraries by default. It appears that current Fedora Linux releases ship with OpenSSL 1.0.2h, which has been patched with the latest security fixes, but the team decided it was time to upgrade the OpenSSL libraries (libssl and libcrypto) to a newer, more advanced branch. Therefore, Fedora 26 Linux will ship with OpenSSL 1.1.0 by default, which will have a massive impact on the overall stability and security of the OS. "Update the OpenSSL library to the 1.1.0 branch in Fedora to bring multiple big improvements, new cryptographic algorithms, and new API that allows for keeping ABI stability in future upgrades. We will also add compat openssl102 package so the applications and other dependencies which are not ported yet to the new API continue to work," reads the proposal. Read more Also: GLPI version 9.1