Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Reviews

Zorin OS For Linux Newbies

Filed under
Reviews

​Zorin OS is another Linux distro for general use purposes as well as for deploying in business workplaces. It is a great free alternative operating system (OS) for Windows users seeking to try out Linux for the first time. Zorin OS provides, by default, the look and feel of MS Windows 10 but still customizable to make it look OS X friendly or GNOME-y if one feel otherwise.

Read more

Purism Librem 13 review: This Linux-based laptop takes your privacy to the next level

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

If you're okay with using a Linux laptop, which you should be, the Librem line of laptops would make a very solid investment. Combine the specs with the incredibly well-built hardware and the privacy features, and you have a laptop that is sure to please most business users that are ready to make the jump to Linux.

Read more

A look at Elementary OS 0.4.1 – Loki

Filed under
Reviews

So, I’ve taken a look at a number if distributions so far, like Linux Mint, Manjaro and KDE Neon, but I figured I should show another distribution that I’d highly recommend for users who are new to GNU/Linux systems; Elementary OS.

If you’re a seasoned poweruser, you’ll likely find Elementary OS to be rather boring, closed off, and annoying. However, I have installed Elementary OS on friends machines who are not very computer friendly, and they have had no problems for years now, without a single complaint.

Loki is based on Ubuntu 16.04, and so reaps the benefits of the Ubuntu repositories.

Read more

Neptune 5: A Practically Perfect Plasma-Based Distro

Filed under
Reviews

The integration of the Plasma 5 desktop in Neptune is smooth and smart. I have not liked much of the Plasma development as it exists in other distros.

However, in this one the Plasma 5 desktop environment is an inviting alternative to my two favorite choices -- Cinnamon and Xfce. This latest Neptune release offers a computing environment that sits comfortably between both of those desktop options.

One notable weakness: If I ever wanted to play any computer games, I would be disappointed with the few meager choices in Neptune's game menu. It offers only GNUDoQ, KBreakout, KMarjongg and KMines. What, not even a solitaire game? Come on!

Read more

MX Linux Review – Version 17 – An Excellent All Around Linux Distribution

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

MX Linux is a popular and fast Linux distribution based on Debian stable that is currently in version 17.1. Today, I'm going to take you through my MX Linux Review to see why this distribution is so popular.

One of the best things about MX Linux is the variety of custom tools that have been built to make the life of the user easier. The team of devs at MX Linux have really outdone themselves making every single possible need as easy as possible with their MX apps.

Read more

Manjaro 17.1.6 Hakoila Plasma - A rollercoaster of Tux

Filed under
Reviews

Wow, there could not be a more bi-polar distro than Manjaro Hakoila. On one hand, it's the state-of-art, bleeding-edge tech demonstrator with some rather brilliant and unique features, belying its Archy roots. On the other, it's rife with bugs and problems that are typical of small distros and badly integrated products. The network and smartphone side of things are particularly bad. You cannot excuse pale fonts or the menu error either, and then, if you've actually read a review, there were a dozen different issues through my test session.

That said, Manjaro 17.1.6 is pretty, inviting, elegant, largely robust and stable, fast enough on ancient hardware, it gives you Nvidia support out of the box, it gives you media goodies, it gives you the Microsoft Office access right there on your desktop, and it's got charm and character that goes beyond the bland copypasta you get elsewhere in the Linux world.

And then, I got meself thinking. I tried a few small but reasonably brilliant distros recently - Manjaro, MX Linux, Antergos. They all have unique, powerful features, all covering different angles. Imagine if they combined their efforts - MX Linux live session data import and its tools, Antergos software wizard, Manjaro office stuff. What a killer distro we could have then! But that's an article for a different time.

Back to Manjaro - I am actually liking this particular edition quite a lot. It's far from perfect, but then, with some hard work and attention to details, this could be an excellent choice for a desktop system. Perhaps more than any other distro did in recent times. Of course, there's still a huge amount of effort needed to make this a fully integrated, offline-online Windows competitor, but it's making steady progress, and I like that. A sure sign of greatness to come. Grade wise, about 7.5/10, just watch out for the buggy parts. And I will extend the testing onto my UEFI-powered Lenovo G50 laptop.

Read more

Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS: What’s New?

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ahead of the Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS release next month you may be wondering what new features and changes the update will bring.

Well, wonder no more.

In this post we round up all of the key information about the next release of one Ubuntu’s most popular community flavors.

Read more

Review: ArchMerge 6.4.1

Filed under
Reviews

The distribution I have been asked most frequently to cover so far in 2018 is ArchMerge, an Arch-based project which runs the Xfce desktop environment and can be installed using the Calamares system installer. If the description sounds familiar, it should, as this summary could equally well apply to Archman, SwagArch and one edition of the Revenge OS distribution.

There are two main features which set ArchMerge apart from its close relatives. First, ArchMerge is available in two flavours. The full featured desktop edition ships with three graphical user interfaces (Xfce, Openbox and i3). A second, minimal flavour is available for people who want to start with a text console and build from the ground up.

The other point which helps ArchMerge stand out from the crowd of Arch-based distributions is its documentation. Arch Linux is famous for its detailed wiki, and rightfully so. ArchMerge takes a slightly different approach and, instead of supplying detailed pages for virtually every aspect of the distribution, the project supplies quick overviews and tutorials for common tasks and issues. These overviews are each accompanied by a video which shows the user how to perform the task.

The ArchMerge website places a strong emphasis on learning and the tutorial pages guide visitors through how to install the distribution, how to configure the desktop, how to install additional software and how to set up file synchronizing through Dropbox. There is also a section dedicated to fixing common problems, a sort of FAQ for distribution issues. Since there are videos for the topics covered, we are shown where to go and what each step should look like, rather than just being given a written description.

Read more

SwagArch 18.02 - U Got Swag?

Filed under
Reviews

SwagArch sounds like an interesting concept. The aesthetic side of things is reasonable, although brown as a color and a dark theme make for a tricky choice. The fonts are pretty good overall. But the visual element is the least of the distro's problems. SwagArch 18.02 didn't deliver the basics, and that's what made Dedoimedo sad.

Network support plus the clock issue, horrible package management and broken programs, those are things that must work perfectly. Without them, the system has no value. So you do get multimedia support and a few unique apps, however that cannot balance out all the woes and problems that I encountered. All in all, Swag needs a lot more work. Also, it will have a tough time competing with Manjaro and Antergos, which are already established and fairly robust Arch spins. Lastly, it needs to narrow down its focus. The overall integration of elements is pretty weak. Eclectic, jumbled, not really tested. 2/10 for now. Let's see how it evolves.

Read more

Linux Mint 18.3 KDE Edition Review – For The Record

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

Linux Mint 18.3 KDE Edition Review. Linux Mint and KDE haven’t always been on my list of favorite things. That said, Linux Mint 18.3 KDE Edition really surprised me – there is a lot to like! Great pulseaudio settings, an improved package manager, plus a whole lot more!

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Total War: WARHAMMER

Red Hat changes its open-source licensing rules

From outside programming circles, software licensing may not seem important. In open-source, though, licensing is all important. So, when leading Linux company Red Hat announces that -- from here on out -- all new Red Hat-initiated open-source projects that use the GNU General Public License(GPLv2) or GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL)v2.1 licenses will be expected to supplement the license with GPL version 3 (GPLv3)'s cure commitment language, it's a big deal. Read more

Android Leftovers

Gentoo-Based Porteus Kiosk 4.7 Brings More Mitigations Against Spectre Flaws

Powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.14.50 kernel, Porteus Kiosk 4.7.0 is the second release of the operating system in 2018 and comes five months after version 4.6 to introduce more mitigations against the Spectre security vulnerabilities, though the next-gen Spectre flaws require microcode firmware updates for Intel CPUs. "Newly discovered "Spectre Next Generation" vulnerabilities require updated microcode from Intel which is not available yet. Please consider enabling automatic updates service for your kiosks to receive latest fixes and patches as soon as they become available," reads today's announcement. Read more