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Reviews

Why not Arch Linux?

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Reviews

I have nothing against Arch. But that's exactly the whole point. There's nothing about it that makes it special or worth taking for an extra spin, especially considering the amount of time and effort needed to get it running. It goes against my belief of how technology is done and mastered, and that makes it unsuitable for home use. And it misses the point what Linux is all about.

Manjaro, Netrunner Rolling, KaOS, and others all base off of Arch, and they do it to varying degrees of success, providing the same baseline, the same final product, just without all the middle bits and pieces. That shows you the middle step of the journey is really optional. Unnecessary. Potentially good for your ego, but ultimately not conducive to any industry-standard expertise or knowledge. Besides, I believe in learning new things all the time. Once you've done an Arch install, repeating it would be a mistake. It means you stay put, you spin around in place, and you're not making progress. Which means the whole focus of what many value as the defining Arch quality isn't really one. It's just one potential step to becoming better at Linux. Maybe. But if you want to do it by the book, there are better, more standardized, more widely accepted methods and tools. And so, for all these reasons, you will probably never see Dedoimedo review stock Arch. Unless it comes fully automated and elegant, of course.

P.S. 95% of people reading this article will completely miss its point and come to the inevitable conclusion that a) Dedoimedo hates Arch and its community Cool Dedoimedo is a noob and is venting his frustration c) wonder if I wrote this article in a VM or on physical hardware d) douche e) kid go back to Windows. I hope I got all the right responses.

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PCLinuxOS 2016.03 "MATE"

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PCLOS
Reviews

PCLinuxOS is a rolling release distribution which was originally forked from Mandriva. Though its roots are in Mandriva, PCLinuxOS is currently maintained as an independent distribution. The project is unusual in two regards. First, PCLinuxOS has a relatively conservative approach for a rolling release distribution. PCLinuxOS maintains desktops with classic layouts, still uses the SysV init software while most Linux-based systems have moved to systemd, and PCLinuxOS tends to have a stronger emphasis on stability than other distributions which employ the rolling release model. The second feature that sets PCLinuxOS apart is that it uses RPM packages with Debian's APT package management tools, an uncommon combination.

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group test: Raspberry Pi Robots

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Linux
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The human race has a certain love affair with robots. From the early days of film we have The Day The Earth Stood Still where an ominous robot named Gort protected his master. Moving forward to the 1970s and 1980s we have the loveable C-3PO, R2-D2 and a certain war machine turned pacifist called Johnny 5. In those early days we would dream of owning a robot that could do our bidding, as long as your bidding did not violate Isaac Asimov’s three laws of robotics.

Building a robots can be an incredibly personal project, from choosing the components to giving the robot a name. Each robot is unique and loved by its maker, and with the Raspberry Pi enabling anyone to build a robot it has never been easier to get started with robotics. There are many different robots on the market, from cheap and cheerful kits that retail for around £30, up to large sophisticated projects such as the Rapiro, which retail for many hundreds of pounds. Choosing the right robot can be a difficult task and that is where kits such as those in our group test can really help get you off to a flying start.

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Samsung Galaxy S7 review: this is the Android phone you’ve been waiting for

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Android
Reviews

First, I purchased my Galaxy S7 directly from Samsung so there were no carrier add-ons, but naturally the phone ships with Samsung’s now default TouchWiz implementation over the top of Android Marshmallow 6.0

I may have a slight bias here because despite a short flirtation with HTC phones in the earlier days of Android I’ve always used Samsung phones, so I’m used to the interface and it doesn’t worry me, and while there were some Samsung apps installed on the device I will never use, they’re hardly a serious burden.

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Review: ODROID-C2, compared to Raspberry Pi 3 and Orange Pi Plus

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Reviews

The ODROID-C2 is a very solid competitor to the Raspberry Pi model 3 B, and is anywhere from 2-10x faster than the Pi 3, depending on the operation. The software and community support is nowhere near what you get with the Raspberry Pi, but it's the best I've seen of all the Raspberry Pi clones I've tried.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Manjaro Linux - This Is Truly Stunning

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Linux
Reviews

I used to watch the Linux Help Guy videos on Youtube before he had to rename his channel for having a slightly racy background image in one of his video tutorials.

He swore by Manjaro Linux and after using it I can totally understand why. I am no big fan of KDE but this is really very very usable, to the point I will be entrusting this to my main machine over the top of Linux Mint.

Is it for everybody? You probably need to learn a little bit of command line, especially the inner workings of Yaourt and PacMan but other than that you should be golden.

This is the best Linux distribution I have used in quite some time.

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Review: Black Lab Linux 7.0.2 Xfce

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Linux
Reviews

Black Lab Linux is supposed to be a distribution that focuses on being easy to use and having a consistent user interface, with the hope of attracting users new to Linux. Unlike many other distributions, it offers professional support (for a fee), and also offers computers for sale that have Black Lab Linux preinstalled. As is typical, the distribution by itself is offered as a free downloadable ISO file, so that's what I tested here. I tested the 64-bit version using a live USB system made with UnetBootin; follow the jump to see what it's like.

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Antergos 2016.02.21

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Antergos Antergos is a cutting edge Linux distribution which is based on Arch Linux. The project creates a powerful desktop oriented operating system that supports several desktop environments and install-time add-ons. Around the middle of February the Antergos project released a snapshot carrying the version number 2016.02.19. At the time I downloaded the ISO image, but was unable to get the distribution to boot on my hardware. I then moved on to explore other projects, but then discovered the Antergos developers had released an updated ISO, this one labelled 2016.02.21. I downloaded this new ISO and found it booted on my test system and so proceeded to experiment with the distribution.

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KaOS 2016.01 review - The fallen angel

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Reviews

You do remember my Mint Rosa resolution, before it recovered majestically? Any distro that fails the basics shall not survive the ordeal or be committed to the disk, as it does not meet the minimum requirements for sane and healthy usage. In this regard, sadly, KaOS 2016.01 failed big time.

I like the way it looks, but that's just the tip of the iceberg. There are just too many bugs, too many problems, that even if the system had somehow installed nicely and without errors, I would still be probably highly skeptical of its ways. But then, it's a hypothetical discussion that won't be resolved today. I might get around to testing KaOS again, but surely not in the foreseeable future. And this most likely applies to any distro using Calamares or any beta-quality installers. That's a risk I'm not willing to accept. Grades wise, you know the score. This one is not on my recommendation short list. Peace.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Netrunner 2016.1

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Linux
Reviews

I quite like Netrunner and I have become accustomed to the way you do things in the past week or so.

I am not that keen however on the KDE Plasma desktop. It still feels big and bulky and too in your face.

If you are want to have a look at the Arch world but not get your feet too wet then this is one way to do it but you are basically using Netrunner on top of Manjaro on top of Arch.

I wouldn't say this version of Netrunner is for the absolute beginner and it won't be everybody's cup of tea. I suspect the Debian version is for the masses and this version is for those who like to play.

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