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Reviews

Crowd-funded OpenShot 2.0 delivers graphic Linux package

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Reviews

While the cross platform aspect is nice, Windows and Mac OS both already have very capable, free video editors. The real winners here are Linux users who now have an editor that's on par with Apple's iMovie (even more powerful than recent versions of iMovie) and bears considerable resemblance to the industry-standard Final Cut Pro.

As I noted in my review of video editors for Linux, OpenShot was once the go-to standard for video editing on GNOME-based distros. And now with 2.0, OpenShot is back and better than ever.

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Review: System76 Lemur

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Linux workstations are like recumbent bicycles. Most people agree they’re the most efficient and ideal solution, but the only people you ever see using them are tinkerers and bearded wizards.

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RebeccaBlackOS Is a Class Act

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OS
Reviews

RebeccaBlackOS offers an interesting window into where the Linux desktop might be headed. The developers behind the scenes working on Wayland seem to be making far better progress than the developers working on the Wayland fork Mir. Ubuntu designers have not yet been able to get Mir working with any desktop environment. The last few Ubuntu releases have bypassed the planned Mir debute.

RBOS gives you enough stability to play around with a variety of user interfaces. It's encouraging that KDE and Gnome 3 shells work so well already on Wayland. The Enlightenment desktop is one of the newest innovations available on several Linux distros, so it should continue to attract interest running so well on Wayland.

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Moto 360 Sport review: The best Android Wear fitness solution so far [Video]

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Android
Reviews

Still, I would say that — from what we’ve seen so far — the Moto 360 Sport is the best fitness option so far to run Google’s watch operating system. And that brings us to the price. Amazon is currently offering the device at around $280, which is $20 less than its retail $300. That’s too much, in my opinion, for any Android Wear watch. But it’s not terrible. It’s the same price as the 2nd generation Moto 360, and right around the same price as the Huawei Watch and other 2015 offerings. At this price I would probably just hold off for a while, but even if you don’t the Moto 360 Sport is a solid watch. At the very least, it’s not worse than the regular Moto 360.

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Meizu PRO 5 Ubuntu edition review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The Meizu Pro 5 is a sleek looking smartphone, which looks pretty similar to the iPhone 6s Plus with its brushed aluminium body and antenna lines. The body is slightly curved at the edge to make it more comfortable to hold in the hand, and the slightly curved 2.5D glass provides a seamless display-to-body design. In terms of dimensions, it’s pretty big due to the inclusion of a 5.7in display, and measures in at 156.7x78x7.5mm. It’s also fairly lightweight, weighing in at 168g, making it 3g lighter than Apple’s iPhone 6s Plus even with a 0.2in larger display.

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Subgraph OS Wants to Make Using a Secure Operating System Less of a Headache

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GNU
Linux
Reviews
Security

While tools for message encryption have become easier to use in recent years, one gaping hole remains in many people's infosec: the security of the device they use (their “end-point”). A new secure operating system called Subgraph OS aims to make resisting hacking attacks easier, even on fairly low-powered laptops.

“It's designed for anybody who wants an end-point that's resistant against remote network exploitation,” David Mirza Ahmad, president of Subgraph, said in a phone interview. Subgraph’s four-man team recently received funding from the Open Technology Fund (OTF) to work on the operating system; the OTF is ultimately funded by grants from Congress.

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Antergos: The first Linux distribution with ZFS support during installation

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The latest edition of Antergos features support for the ZFS file system during installation, which makes it the first (desktop) Linux distribution that I am aware of with ZFS as a file system option during installation.

Antergos is a Linux distribution that’s based on Arch Linux. ZFS is an advanced file system with built-in volume management that originated from Oracle Solaris operating system (formerly Sun Solaris).

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ARM’s Cortex A32 is a tiny CPU for wearables and Raspberry Pi-like boards

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ARM's Cortex CPU core designs are widely used by all kinds of chipmakers who don't want to create their own ARM CPU designs from scratch, so it's important to pay attention when the company announces a new one. The ones we see the most often around here are the mainstream 64-bit cores for smartphones and tablets—the high-end Cortex A72 and A57 and the mid-end Cortex A53—but ARM produces a variety of smaller designs for ultra-low-power and embedded applications, too.

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A review of Zorin OS 11 Core

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My experience with Zorin OS 11 Core was positive. I liked it well enough, I am just not sure I would recommend this particular release of Zorin OS to Windows users looking to make the switch to Linux. The current Long Term Support release, sure. A future version based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, almost certainly. Do not get me wrong, Zorin OS 11 is very good, but it will only be supported for six months, making it a hard sell to Windows users used to longer time periods between releases. That said, I do encourage Linux users with an interest in user interface design to give Zorin OS a test drive. A user interface that can transition between three different desktop styles (six in the paid versions) on the fly is worth exploring if only just to learn from it.

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Ubuntu Gnome 15.10 - A pot of cold

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GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Gnome 15.10 Wily Werewolf is an interesting little beastling. It is an okay distro, and compared to some of its family, actually better in terms of raw functionality. Sadly, end of January when I tested this, roughly two months after Ubuntu 15.10 has been released, the same set of bugs that plagued us early on still affects the distro family. Wily Werewolf with the Gnome desktop is no exception, and it suffers from unnecessary, reproducible regressions.

Multimedia and smartphone support are quite good, the presentation layer and apps are decent. But resource utilization can be more frugal, there are some obvious issues in the system management, and old, known bugs must die. Battery life is also a letdown. Well, hard to expect miracles from such a dreadful lot, and this Gnome edition probably does as good as it can. If you're after Ubuntu and not too keen on Unity, this could be your desktop. Overall grade 7.5/10. We've seen better days, though. Frankly, you should focus on the Xfce desktop, and give Mint a long and thorough check. That brings us to the end of this review.

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Also: GNOME Shell Updated for GNOME 3.20 with Better Identification of VPN Secrets

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