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Reviews

Simply Linux 7.0.5: Love from Russia

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Simply Linux is not a new guest on Linux notes from DarkDuck. I have already reviewed it twice: versions 6.0.1 and 4.0.

Simply is not an independent distribution. Instead, it is based on the ALT Linux, a distribution from a team of Russian developers. While ALT Linux is a KDE-oriented distro, Simply uses Xfce. Both of these distributions share the same platform, called Sisyphus.

As with many other Linux distributions, Simply and ALT Linux continue development. The current version of Sisyphus is 7, that means that Simply Linux has the same number in the name.

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Parsix GNU/Linux 8.0

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Reviews
Debian

Parsix The Parsix project released Parsix GNU/Linux 8.0 in September. The distribution is based on Debian and, in the project's own words, their goal is "to provide a ready to use and easy to install desktop and laptop optimized operating system based on Debian's Testing branch and the latest stable release of GNOME desktop environment."

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Android 6.0 review: A small but significant bump for the world's dominant OS

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Android
Reviews

All the big changes happened in Lollipop. Now it's Marshmallow's turn is to show the world how useful and personal Android can be.

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Netrunner Rolling 2015.09 Released With New Plasma 5 And Apps Updates

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Linux
Reviews


Netrunner Rolling 2015.09 Released With New Plasma 5 And Apps Updates

Netrunner is  a Linux distribution that comes into two versions - Main version and Rolling release. Main version is based on Kubuntu and the Rollingrelease is based on Manjaro Linux. The new Netrunner  2015.09 has been released with a completely different look - KDE4 has been transformed to Plasma 5.2 desktop. Let's look at the complete changes in the Netrunner 2015.09 release.

Android 6.0 Marshmallow review

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Android
Reviews

Android, Google’s mobile operating system, has matured a lot over the past year. It’s running on 1.4 billion devices (up from 1 billion last year) and its most popular app store, Google Play, has more than 1 billion active users. In the last quarter, IDC estimates that Android held 82.8 percent of the global smartphone market. As its newest iteration, 6.0 Marshmallow, rolls out, Android’s going incredibly, undeniably strong.

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Slackel Linux: Not Your Father's Slackware

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Reviews
Slack

You might think of the Slackel distro as a better Slackware derivative. Slackware dates back to 1992. By comparison, well-known and well-used distros such as Ubuntu, Fedora and Linux Mint were introduced in the mid-2000s. So Slackware is among the oldest actively maintained Linux distros. Despite its longevity, it has not joined more modern Linux offspring in terms of user friendliness.

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Android 6.0 Marshmallow Review: Google Outsmarts Apple By Guessing Your Next Move

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Android
Reviews

It may seem like a big decision, but something tells me the service arms race is going to be a lot like the feature race. Google has the nose on Apple with Google Now on Tap until… Apple figures out a way to borrow it.

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Ally Skills Training at LinuxCon 2015: Uniting All the World’s Geeks, No Exceptions

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Linux
Reviews

In a culture that celebrates freedom and resists conformity, establishing rules and regulations isn’t always easy. So when LinuxCon introduced its Code of Conduct in 2010, it became one of the first open source conferences to outline an anti-harassment policy and act on reports of misconduct. Today, similar codes of conduct are in place at hundreds of conferences and events worldwide -- and this year’s LinuxCon continues to see more women on panels and at the podium than ever before.

It all came about thanks to work between Valerie Aurora, former kernel developer and open source diversity champion, and leaders at the Linux Foundation. But they didn’t stop with the Code of Conduct. In the past year, LinuxCon has also hosted the Ally Skills Workshop, which teaches men simple, everyday ways to support women in their workplaces and at events like LinuxCon.

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An Android living in your computer

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Android
Reviews

The Android-x86 project is an on-going effort to make Google's Android operating system, typically run on phones and other mobile devices, run smoothly on laptops, desktop computers and tablets equipped with x86 processors. Android-x86, on paper at least, offers most of the features one would expect from a desktop operating system.

This week I decided to download the project's latest release, version 4.4-r3, and see how well it would work as a desktop operating system. The Android-x86 download page is a bit cluttered, but I eventually found what I was looking for, a 411MB ISO file I could use to install this unusual operating system.

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Android 6.0 Marshmallow, thoroughly reviewed

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Android
Reviews

After a lengthy developer preview, the newest version of Google's flagship operating system is finally ready for the masses. Android 6.0 Marshmallow is the twenty-third version of Google's "mobile" operating system, though it can accurately be described as "mobile" only if you're referring to how much it gets around. With all the areas in which Google now tinkers, Marshmallow is destined for smartphones, tablets, watches, televisions, and cars, among others.

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Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.

Red Hat: ‘Hybrid Cloud’, University of Alabama, Red Hat Upgrades Ansible and Expectations