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Reviews

Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn review - No rainbows

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Ubuntu

I am willing to extend the slight benefit of doubt to the Ubuntu family and retest on different hardware sometime in the future, as well as give Kubuntu and Xubuntu their due spin and such. But if this turns out to be legacy hardware issues so to speak, then we will be having an essay in expletives. Anyhow, skip this. Stay with Trusty, it's awesome and stable and fun. And let's see what the rest of the pack can do. For now, Unicorn, 0/10.

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Welcome to Parsix GNU/Linux 7.0r0 Release Notes

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Parsix GNU/Linux is a live and installation DVD based on Debian. Our goal is to provide a ready to use and easy to install desktop and laptop optimized operating system based on Debian's testing branch and the latest stable release of GNOME desktop environment. Users can easily install extra software packages from Parsix APT repositories. Our annual release cycle consists of two major and four minor versions. We have our own software repositories and build servers to build and provide all the necessary updates and missing features in Debian stable branch.

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Black Lab Linux Is GNOME 3's Best Friend

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Black Lab Linux is a general purpose free distribution for home users and small-to-mid-sized businesses. This particular segment of the Linux OS tries to bridge free OS and preconfigured commercial hardware/software with a flexible set of options.

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Xubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn : Fast and Responsive

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Xubuntu is an elegant Linux distribution based on Ubuntu, which uses the lightweight Xfce desktop environment to work, instead of the Unity desktop. Xubuntu is designed for computers with low computing resource, always guaranteeing the best performance.

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Leftovers: Screenshots

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Kano: The Can-Do Coding Kit for Kids of All Ages

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Kano is a computer and coding kit that is suitable for all ages. Well, to be truthful, Kano's step-by-step instructions in the included booklets and its simplified Linux-based operating system target kids aged 6 to 14.

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Leftovers: Screenshots

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HP Ubuntu laptop (255 G1) review

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HP’s latest notebook saves money by ditching Windows for Ubuntu. Is your next notebook Open Source?

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Taking Ubuntu 14.10 for a ride

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu is one of the more widely used GNU/Linux distributions in the world with the project's parent company, Canonical, reporting around 30 million computers shipping with Ubuntu pre-installed in the past two years. Ubuntu, along with its many community editions, continues to be used by millions around the world and the decisions made by Ubuntu developers have an direct impact on many computer users.

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Nexus 9 Review: A Powerful Tablet…for Android Die-Hards Only

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The Nexus 7 formula wasn’t broken, but Google went and fixed it anyway. The Nexus 7 tablet has been discontinued, and the Nexus 9 is the replacement.

Designed by Google in collaboration with HTC, the Nexus 9 is bigger, less portable and almost twice as expensive as its predecessor. With a 9-inch display and $399 price tag, it’s now competing squarely against Apple ’s iPad Air models. After using the Nexus 9 for almost a week, I can say that while it’s a great tablet, it’s not for everybody.

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More in Tux Machines

Open source SDR SBC runs Snappy Ubuntu on Cyclone V

The open source, $299 “LimeSDR” board runs Snappy Ubuntu Core on a Cyclone V, and supports user-defined radios ranging from ZigBee to LTE. UK-based Lime Microsystems, which develops field programmable RF (FPRF) transceivers for wireless broadband systems, has launched an open source software defined radio (SDR) board on CrowdSupply. Like other Linux-based SDR systems we’ve seen, the LimeSDR uses an FPGA to help orchestrate wireless communications that can be tuned, manipulated, and reconfigured to different wireless standards via software. Read more

Critical Infrastructure Goes Open Source

The electrical grid, water, roads and bridges—the infrastructure we take for granted—is seldom noticed until it's unavailable. The burgeoning open source software movement is taking steps to help rebuild crumbling U.S. civil infrastructure while capitalizing on expansion in emerging markets by providing software building blocks to help develop interoperable and secure transportation, electric power, oil and gas as well as the healthcare infrastructure. Under a program launched in April called the Civil Infrastructure Platform, the Linux Foundation said the initiative would provide "an open source base layer of industrial grade software to enable the use and implementation of software building blocks for civil infrastructure." Read more

Where have all the MacBooks gone at Linux conferences?

In past years, the vast ocean of Apple logos really undercut any statement of “Linux is great.” People would, inevitably, retort with, “Then why are all the 'Linux People' using Macs?” Admittedly, that was a great point and has been a source of shame for many of us for a very long time. But now things are different. The Apple logos are (mostly) gone from Linux conferences. This may be an unscientific observation from one person attending a few conferences in North America. Regardless, it's a great feeling. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu 16.04 to-do list
    UBUNTU 16.04 or Xenial Xerus, the latest upgrade of the popular Linux distribution, became available as a free download last month, and early reviews have been favorable. Instead of upgrading my existing Ubuntu 15.10 system, this time I opted for a fresh install. I also decided to give the improved Unity 7 desktop a go, instead of installing my preferred alternative XFCE. The installation process was trouble-free, but because I started from scratch, I had quite a bit to add and tweak after the OS itself was installed.
  • Ubuntu Founder Pledges No Back Doors in Linux
    VIDEO: Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu, discusses what might be coming in Ubuntu 16.10 later this year and why security is something he will never compromise. Ubuntu developers are gathering this week for the Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS), which runs from May 3-5, to discuss development plans for the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 Linux distribution release, code-named "Yakkety Yak."
  • Ubuntu & Other Ubuntu Spins Look At Making Room To Grow
    With Ubuntu's install images continuing to be oversized with pushing 1.4GB on recent releases, Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek has raised the new limit for Ubuntu desktop images to 2GB. Other Ubuntu flavors are also following in this move. Langasek has raised the size limit for images now to 2GB for being able to accomodate the current oversized images plus still having room to grow.
  • Ubuntu’s Snap packages aren’t yet as secure as Canonical’s marketing claims
    Canonical has been talking up Snaps, a new type of package format featured in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. “Users can install a snap without having to worry whether it will have an impact on their other apps or their system,” reads Canonical’s announcement. But this isn’t true, as prominent free software developer Matthew Garrett recently pointed out.