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Reviews

My Week with Trojita

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Reviews

Email clients have long been a necessary evil for anybody living in the information age. I have yet to find an email client that I like. Tolerate, yes. But not like. I have found web browsers that I like, note taking programs that I like, even text editors that I love. But email remains the proverbial thorn in my desktop side.

For years now I’ve been using Mozilla’s Thunderbird, because while I don’t actually like it, it’s the one I hate the least. It has been stable and reliable all this time, something that couldn’t be said for the Evolution client it replaced. But it had flaws, and plenty of them. The biggest of which, in my opinion, is that it is slow. Not only is it slow when I’m doing something with it, it’s somehow even slow when I’m not doing anything.

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Simplicity Linux 15.1 Is Based on Slacko – Gallery

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Simplicity Linux, a Linux distribution based on Slacko that uses the LXDE desktop, has reached version 15.1 and is now available for download and testing.

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HummingBoard-i2eX review, dual-core SBC which runs Android and Linux

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Android
Linux
Reviews

The HummingBoard-i2eX is a versatile board. It has greater performance than the Raspberry Pi 1 and includes more memory. At $110 it is more expensive than the Raspberry Pi, but you get more for your money.
The attraction of Single Board Computers (SBCs) for both hobbyists and developers (as a prototyping platform) is clear and their lure has been rising steadily for many years. Probably the most famous SBC is the Raspberry Pi, however there are lots of companies that make these nimble little boards. I recently reviewed the MIPS Creator CI20, a SBC designed around a MIPS based CPU rather than an ARM based one. However the Pi and the CI20 aren’t the only SBCs out there. SolidRun has several different products that use Freescale’s i.MX 6 series of processors. The i.MX 6 range is based on ARM’s Cortex-A9 design and scales from single- to quad-core.

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KaOS 2014.12 review - Chaos and anarchy

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Reviews

KaOS 2014.12 is a very slick, very beautiful product. But it is not the most refined operating system out there. Sure, in terms of friendliness and accessibility, it's right there among the big names, offering everything a user might want or need. Still, to get to that point, you will need to sweat a little. Printing, installer errors, availability of software, all these are potentially critical obstacles that must be addressed before KaOS can become a familiar and well-recommended family name.

You cannot fault the composition, the style, the setup. It's really charming. Done with elegance. Maybe all my ranting has helped bring Linux aesthetics to a higher level. But while I do sometimes drool over pretty and shiny, I demand stability and predictability, first and foremost. KaOS has some catching up to do here. And so, it probably deserves around 6.5/10. Pitted against Manjaro, Netrunner Rolling and Chakra, it's probably the second best Archy offering out there at the moment. The best? Well, read all those other reviews. Anyhow, this isn't bad, but not quite good enough to wrestle with Ubuntu, Mint and friends. I shall definitely follow this distro's progress.

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Raspberry Pi 2 review – not all the same

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Linux
Reviews

We’ll be honest, when the Raspberry Pi 2 hit our desk in mid- January we were very excited to crack it open and try it out. From what we had been told this was basically the Raspberry Pi everyone had ever wanted, at least in terms of power. It was a bit of a have-your-cake-and-eat-it moment though, as we hooked up the board that was essentially a Model B+ and began using a very familiar Raspbian layout.

It worked fantastically well; while performing normal computer actions there was none of the classic slowdown the Pi used to get. We could upgrade the system and comfortably do other tasks such as web browsing or even word processing. Simple yet appreciated, and on the surface that’s really about it for the Raspberry Pi 2. There is no real killer feature of the updated Raspbian that we can point to that illustrates the new Pi’s full abilities.
However, this is frankly a great thing. The Raspberry Pi Foundation’s mission has always been education, and with the amount of excellent tutorials and software that already exist for the Raspberry Pi, making the Pi 2 very different would make the last three years of work obsolete.

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I Switched (Back) Over To Fedora As My Main OS & It's Going Great!

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Red Hat
Reviews
Ubuntu

Before this long stint with Ubuntu on my main system, I was using Fedora (Core) and before that was openSUSE, Mandrake, and others. I stopped using Fedora (Core) due to some of the releases being less reliable than others with at the time less of a focus on shipping quality releases and at times just feeling like a dirty testing ground for RHEL. With being very pleased with Fedora 20 and Fedora 21 on the many test systems around the office, I decided to give Fedora another go on my main system. I've also been very interested in Fedora.Next and how Fedora 22 is shaping up. Fedora these days seems to be back on a solid footing for end-users with a bright future ahead; Fedora 22 might even ship on time for a change while not sacrificing quality! Fedora 21 brings back a lot of good memories for me of the early Fedora days.

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today's howtos

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HowTos

Plex Media Server Review – The Ultimate Steaming Server

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Reviews

Plex Media Server is a media center application that allows users to stream video and audio content to local and remote clients, such as mobile devices or smart TVs. We now take a closer look at this powerful server and client and see what's the fuss all about.

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CoreOS Co-Founder Alex Polvi Talks Containers, Rocket vs. Docker, and More

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Linux
Reviews

CoreOS has gained notoriety over the past few years as the creator of a new Linux distribution designed for massive, Google-scale server deployments. The company's star has risen along with the popularity of Linux containers -- a key component of CoreOS -- and their open source components are being widely incorporated by companies on the bleeding edge of distributed computing.

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Variety Review – A Wallpaper Manager You Didn't Know You Wanted

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Reviews

Variety is an application that manages your wallpapers and is open source. You might ask, what's so special about that? Well, the truth is that you don't know you want one until you've actually tried it.

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University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project of the Linux Foundation dedicated to creating open source software solutions for the automobile industry. It also leverages the ten billion dollar investment in the Linux kernel. The work of the AGL project enables software developers to keep pace with the demands of customers and manufacturers in this rapidly changing space, while encouraging collaboration. Walt Miner is the community manager for Automotive Grade Linux, and he spoke at LinuxCon in Toronto recently on how Automotive Grade Linux is changing the way automotive manufacturers develop software. He worked for Motorola Automotive, Continental Automotive, and Montevista Automotive program, and saw lots of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like Ford, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota in action over the years. Read more

Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more