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Reviews

Meizu PRO 5 Ubuntu edition review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The Meizu Pro 5 is a sleek looking smartphone, which looks pretty similar to the iPhone 6s Plus with its brushed aluminium body and antenna lines. The body is slightly curved at the edge to make it more comfortable to hold in the hand, and the slightly curved 2.5D glass provides a seamless display-to-body design. In terms of dimensions, it’s pretty big due to the inclusion of a 5.7in display, and measures in at 156.7x78x7.5mm. It’s also fairly lightweight, weighing in at 168g, making it 3g lighter than Apple’s iPhone 6s Plus even with a 0.2in larger display.

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Subgraph OS Wants to Make Using a Secure Operating System Less of a Headache

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GNU
Linux
Reviews
Security

While tools for message encryption have become easier to use in recent years, one gaping hole remains in many people's infosec: the security of the device they use (their “end-point”). A new secure operating system called Subgraph OS aims to make resisting hacking attacks easier, even on fairly low-powered laptops.

“It's designed for anybody who wants an end-point that's resistant against remote network exploitation,” David Mirza Ahmad, president of Subgraph, said in a phone interview. Subgraph’s four-man team recently received funding from the Open Technology Fund (OTF) to work on the operating system; the OTF is ultimately funded by grants from Congress.

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Antergos: The first Linux distribution with ZFS support during installation

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The latest edition of Antergos features support for the ZFS file system during installation, which makes it the first (desktop) Linux distribution that I am aware of with ZFS as a file system option during installation.

Antergos is a Linux distribution that’s based on Arch Linux. ZFS is an advanced file system with built-in volume management that originated from Oracle Solaris operating system (formerly Sun Solaris).

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ARM’s Cortex A32 is a tiny CPU for wearables and Raspberry Pi-like boards

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Reviews

ARM's Cortex CPU core designs are widely used by all kinds of chipmakers who don't want to create their own ARM CPU designs from scratch, so it's important to pay attention when the company announces a new one. The ones we see the most often around here are the mainstream 64-bit cores for smartphones and tablets—the high-end Cortex A72 and A57 and the mid-end Cortex A53—but ARM produces a variety of smaller designs for ultra-low-power and embedded applications, too.

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A review of Zorin OS 11 Core

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Reviews

My experience with Zorin OS 11 Core was positive. I liked it well enough, I am just not sure I would recommend this particular release of Zorin OS to Windows users looking to make the switch to Linux. The current Long Term Support release, sure. A future version based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, almost certainly. Do not get me wrong, Zorin OS 11 is very good, but it will only be supported for six months, making it a hard sell to Windows users used to longer time periods between releases. That said, I do encourage Linux users with an interest in user interface design to give Zorin OS a test drive. A user interface that can transition between three different desktop styles (six in the paid versions) on the fly is worth exploring if only just to learn from it.

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Ubuntu Gnome 15.10 - A pot of cold

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GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Gnome 15.10 Wily Werewolf is an interesting little beastling. It is an okay distro, and compared to some of its family, actually better in terms of raw functionality. Sadly, end of January when I tested this, roughly two months after Ubuntu 15.10 has been released, the same set of bugs that plagued us early on still affects the distro family. Wily Werewolf with the Gnome desktop is no exception, and it suffers from unnecessary, reproducible regressions.

Multimedia and smartphone support are quite good, the presentation layer and apps are decent. But resource utilization can be more frugal, there are some obvious issues in the system management, and old, known bugs must die. Battery life is also a letdown. Well, hard to expect miracles from such a dreadful lot, and this Gnome edition probably does as good as it can. If you're after Ubuntu and not too keen on Unity, this could be your desktop. Overall grade 7.5/10. We've seen better days, though. Frankly, you should focus on the Xfce desktop, and give Mint a long and thorough check. That brings us to the end of this review.

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Also: GNOME Shell Updated for GNOME 3.20 with Better Identification of VPN Secrets

Remix OS 2.0 Alpha review

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Reviews

Can you think of a dangerous software combo? I can. An alpha version of Android-x86, available for testing. Now, to make things more complicated, the actual software is 64-bit, you can use it in both persistent and non-persistent modes, so your data is preserved between reboots, and I'm not sure what happens to your hard disks underneath.

Which is why I was very keen to test Remix OS, again based on a recommendation from a merry fellow named Mehdi, but I was hesitant to try it on any one of my production or even test laptops. Plus, Android, as a PC concept, has never quite captured my heart. To wit, we'll be having a virtual machine experiment, not so much to test performance and hardware compatibility, but more to showcase what Remix OS can do as an operating system. After me.

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Reviewing the Lenovo 11e: A sub-$300 Thinkpad with great Linux support

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Linux
Reviews

The laptop is delightfully old-school feeling. The 11-inch screen has a relatively large bezel around each of the edges. And the screen itself, while being absolutely fine, has somewhat limited viewing angles compared to nicer display panels. The keys on the keyboard all have a satisfying “click” to them. Add to this the fact that this machine has an actual Ethernet port… and it almost makes you feel like you’ve traveled back in time to the late 1990’s. In the best possible way.

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The Best Free And Open Source Photo Managers For Linux – Review And Comparison

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Linux
OSS
Reviews

Cheap smartphones and digital cameras – the principal factor of digital revolution. Every man can create a personal collection with gigabytes or even terabytes of multimedia content, and online services like the Google Photos or Flickr can help to save them. Clouds are good, but sometimes the local work with multimedia is more speedy and effective. Photo manager can organize your chaos and highlight the best or the worst material with tags and rating; some software also have some photo editing features: red eyes, contrast and defects correction, colors and shadows level. If you are working with RAW formats, the photo manager can make your life easier with image processing and converting to popular formats; some photo managers have also video support. In this review I want to tell about the best software that can be run on Linux and other operating system.

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Nextbit Robin Review

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Android
Reviews

Crowdfunding isn’t a new concept and while many projects do fail to see the light of day, just occasionally, we’re treated to a project that has the potential to alter the way we use technology. The problem of limited storage is one that affects the growing number of devices that launch without microSD card expansion, but American company Nextbit has a unique solution to this growing problem with its Nextbit Robin smartphone.

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Android Leftovers

Canonical Releases AMD Microcode Updates for All Ubuntu Users to Fix Spectre V2

The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were publicly disclosed earlier this year and discovered to affect billions of devices made in the past two decades. Unearthed by Jann Horn of Google Project Zero, the second variant (CVE-2017-5715) of the Spectre vulnerability is described as a branch target injection attack. The security vulnerability affects all microprocessors that use branch prediction and speculative execution function, and it can allow unauthorized memory reads via side-channel attacks if the system isn't patched. For example, a local attacker could use it to expose sensitive information, including kernel memory. Read more

PulseAudio 12 Open-Source Sound System Released with AirPlay, A2DP Improvements

Highlights of PulseAudio 12.0 include better latency reporting with the A2DP Bluetooth profile, which also improves A/V sync, more accurate latency reporting on AirPlay devices, the ability to prioritize HDMI output over S/PDIF output, HSP support for more Bluetooth headsets, and the ability to disable input and output on macOS. PulseAudio 12.0 also adds support for Steelseries Arctis 7 USB headset stereo output and Dell's Thunderbolt Dock TB16 speaker jack, a new "dereverb" option that can be used for the Speex echo canceller, a new module-always-source module, better detection of Native Instruments Traktor Audio 6, and improved digital input support for various USB sound cards. Read more

Automatically Change Wallpapers in Linux with Little Simple Wallpaper Changer

Here is a tiny script that automatically changes wallpaper at regular intervals in your Linux desktop. Read more