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Reviews

Underrated Android: Asus ZenFone 2 An Impressive Unlocked Flagship Device At Budget Pricing

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Android
Reviews

The subsidized smartphone market is sort of a racket. Well, Okay, it’s not sort of a racket. It’s definitely a racket. Every time your phone starts feeling old or worn out, or if you’re jonesing for the latest superphone bling, most mainstream consumers have to consider dealing with their carrier’s “new every two” plan or some other scheme to lock you into a long term contract. So you’re stuck with potentially lousy coverage if you move or travel a lot to a new area, or if that carrier isn’t keeping up with competitive rates. It’s a catch-22 of course. How else are carriers going to offer reasonable prices on the latest premium smartphones, but to rope you in and make up the profit on service fees?

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Fedora 22 review - Fiascoed

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Red Hat
Reviews

And so, without any application testing, any customization, desktop effects, resource usage testing, and some other bits and pieces, we must bring the Fedora Twenty-Two KDE review to a halt. Because the distro is dead, and it can't cope with some simple updates and installs. Really a shame. It reminds me that Fedora is a testbed. But it used to be quite stable recently, and now, we're back in 2010.

I really am disappointed. I wish I had some better news for you, but this release simply doesn't cut it. It's riddled with bugs, even when it works, and then it stops working. Slow, laggy, average hardware compatibility including Nvidia problems, a less than ideal presentation layer, all in all, a rushed edition with no soul or passion. You can't fake those. Grade we must, and so Fedora 22 gets a very feeble 2/10. See you around.

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Also: A Quick Look At Fedora 22 “XFCE” | What’s New

Further Adventures in Calculate Linux

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Reviews

I've been experimenting in Calculate Linux lately because it offered a modern KDE without systemd or selinux installed by default, and perhaps a bit because of my nostalgia for Gentoo. Things got off to a rocky start, but after ironing out most of wrinkles and I'm finding myself right at home. I think you could too.

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Cinnamon 2.6 – a Linux desktop for Windows XP refugees

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Reviews

Cinnamon is best known as one of the two default desktops for Linux Mint, which is fast approaching its next major update. Mint 17.2 will include the brand new Cinnamon 2.6, just released, when delivered later this year.

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Dell Venue 10 7000 review: This isn't your average Android tablet

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Android
Reviews

As a Guy Who Reviews Android Devices™, I've been faced with a strange sort of conundrum lately: When someone asks me to recommend a 10-in. Android tablet, I haven't had a good answer.

Sure, there are plenty of options out there. But it's been quite a while since there's been one that's stood out for being really great. Most of the contenders come with at least one serious caveat, be it chintzy construction, less-than-perfect performance, or software that makes you want to strike yourself with the nearest blunt object. And suffice it to say, those kinds of things take significant tolls on what a device is like to use.

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Nvidia Shield Review: The Best Way To Experience Android TV

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Android
Reviews

Nvidia has built two Shield devices in the past, but their latest hardware to carry the brand differs a little since it’s the first non-portable in the lineup.

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First impressions of Chromixium OS 1.0

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Google
Reviews

My point is that people who are likely to enjoy Chromebooks and use their computers almost solely for accessing the web will probably find Chromixium quite useful. However, while it is technically possible to access more features and off-line software through Chromixium's application menu, the process is slow and awkward when compared with other desktop Linux distributions. Granted, Chromixium is still in its early stages, it just hit version 1.0, so the standalone features will probably improve in time. For now, I think Chromixium offers an interesting web-focused environment with the fallback option of using locally installed applications. The implementation has some rough edges at the moment, but I suspect it will get better in future releases.

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Linux Mint 17.1: Simplicity at Its Best

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Reviews

Linux Mint is a special kind of Linux distribution—one that has gone a very long way to hold true to the form, function, and spirit that has guided Linux for a very long time. While other distributions march into the shiny, touch-friendly world that is the future, Mint remains grounded in what has worked for decades. With just the slightest of tweaks, Mint has gone boldly into that good night while keeping a foot deeply planted in the familiar.

With it’s latest release, 17.1 “Rebecca”, Linux Mint retains all of that which is familiar and beloved by its long time followers and adds enough polish to help attract new users.

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Calculate Installation Fail, Almost

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Reviews
-s

This evening I decided to install Calculate Linux, so I threw in the LiveDVD and rebooted. The installer was interesting, easy to use, but I wonder why it asked which I/O scheduler I wished to use. Okay, I get asking the filesystem choice, but the last I even thought about I/O schedulers I was building a kernel - and I don't recall when exactly that was but I think it started with a 2.4. I tried to select default (one of the choices that sounded safe) but it kept going back to BFQ. The remaining steps proceeded fine until time to install GRUB. That failed with the error couldn't find update-grub.new. Hmm. So, next reboot I get dropped to a grub terminal. Yippie.

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LG Watch Urbane hands-on: An Android Wear smartwatch for the board room

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Android
Reviews

The LG G4 is an impressive Android smartphone so I looked forward to checking out the new LG Watch Urbane smartwatch. It's definitely one of the classiest Android Wear devices available with a fantastic display that looks great with a suit and tie.

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More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing
    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.