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Reviews

Hands-on with Makulu Linux Xfce 7.0: The most beautiful Linux distro I have ever seen

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Reviews

The latest release of Makulu Linux has two major things going for it: first, it is based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, rather than Debian, and second, it uses the Xfce desktop. Makulu seems to be doing a tour or rotation of desktops so perhaps having Xfce shouldn't be a surprise, anyway.

The Release Announcement / Release Notes give some interesting insight into the background and development of this release, as well as the major features of this release. As always with Makulu Linux, aesthetics was a major focus, and it includes loads of beautiful wallpapers, themes, icons and fonts. The other major focus was speed, thus the choice of Xfce for the desktop, and Firefox rather than Chrome, the synapse launcher rather than slingscold, and the inclusion or omission of various other packages.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Xubuntu 14.10

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Reviews
Ubuntu

It has been just over a year since I last reviewed Xubuntu, so this review is well overdue.

Xubuntu has been one of my favourite distributions for a long time and for a number of very good reasons.

Xubuntu comes with the XFCE desktop environment which means that it is lightweight and highly customisable.

What I also like about Xubuntu over some of the other XFCE based distributions is that it doesn't overload you with applications. You get just enough to cover the bases but it is then up to you to install what is important for your needs.

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uGet Review – Probably the Best Download Manager on Linux

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GNU
Linux
Software
Reviews

Download managers are not something new for Linux users, but it's true that apps with nice GUIs and lots of options are. uGet is definitely one of the most interesting download managers for the Linux platform and we'll now take a closer look at it.

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[Video] Hands-On Review of the Samsung Gear S wrist strap – Cobalt Blue

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Linux
Hardware
Reviews

In all respects this is the Samsung quality as the original Gear S strap you are currently using, so you know this product well, but it is currently selling for £40 in the UK, which is about $62USD. This is a good product, but it’s at a premium price and you have to ask yourself, Do I really need it?

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Purism Librem 15

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

While the Librem 15 doesn't necessarily match my personal tastes for laptop hardware due to the overall size and the mouse in particular, the mission of the company definitely does. Up until this point there were few options for laptops that ran purely Free Software, much less any that had modern hardware and a modern look and feel. I believe Purism genuinely wants to create a quality laptop that will appeal both to the Free Software community as well as privacy advocates and the Librem 15 is a nice start. In this era of pervasive surveillance, rootkits bundled with corporate software, threats of hardware backdoors by nation states, and the overall increasing sophistication of attacks, I think Purism is on to something here. As more people value transparency as a means toward security, a computer that can provide the source code for every driver, application, and firmware it uses becomes more valuable.

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Review: CentOS 7.0 GNOME

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Red Hat
Reviews

I tried CentOS 7.0 GNOME on a live USB made with UnetBootin. Follow the jump to see what it's like. (As will become clear soon enough, there are no pictures in this review, and for the same reason, this review will be relatively shorter. Suffice it to say for now that the distribution basically looks identical to Scientific Linux 7.0 GNOME from screenshots.)

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Android 5.0.2 Review: 9 Tips for Nexus Users

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Reviews

Google’s new Android 5.0.2 Lollipop update is rolling out to Nexus 7 users in finally rolling out in full force. With the roll out expanding by the day, we want to review what we know about the Nexus 7 Android 5.0.2 Lollipop update and offer some useful tips for owners of Google’s aging former flagship.

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Fedora 21 review - Uh, not again

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Reviews

Why did Fedora 21 have to be so buggy? Why? I wanted it to succeed, I wanted it to be cool and fun, just like the last release. There was so much potential, and then, something went wrong. Quite a few somethings, apparently. Installer partition selections, bootloader, login, codecs, printing, desktop effects. Damn. Fedora, where art thou?

Anyhow, Fedora 21 KDE is just not as good as it should be. Not as good as its predecessor, not as good as its rival, and most importantly, not as good as Fedora. There must be a baseline to quality, and it must never be crossed, downwards. This time, I did not get what I wanted, and I'm sad, because I know that Fedora can do it. We've all seen it happen. So more time is needed in the special oven for naughty distros. Perhaps I rushed testing just days after the official release, but it is how it is. 6/10. Done.

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Also: Fedora 21 GNOME Review: If you can ignore the initial hiccups, fantastic operating system!

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How To Build A Raspberry Pi Smartwatch — The Geekiest Watch Ever Made

In our Getting Started With Raspberry Pi series, we’ve introduced you to the basics of Pi, told you how to get everything you need, and help you boot a basic operating system. But, Raspberry Pi is much more than that. You can use it as a TOR proxy router, build your own PiPhone, and even install Windows 10 IoT. This little device comes with lots of flexibility, that allows it to be used in multiple applications. Well, did you ever think about wearing your Raspberry Pi? If your answer is NO, I won’t be surprised. If you imagine a scenario where Raspberry Pi is used to build a smartwatch, it would look too bulky. Well, that’s the thing about making geeky things that set you apart from the regular crowd, right? Read more

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I've been Linuxing since before you were born

Once upon a time, there was no Linux. No, really! It did not exist. It was not like today, with Linux everywhere. There were multiple flavors of Unix, there was Apple, and there was Microsoft Windows. When it comes to Windows, the more things change, the more they stay the same. Despite adding 20+ gigabytes of gosh-knows-what, Windows is mostly the same. (Except you can't drop to a DOS prompt to get actual work done.) Hey, who remembers Gorilla.bas, the exploding banana game that came in DOS? Fun times! The Internet never forgets, and you can play a Flash version on Kongregate.com. Apple changed, evolving from a friendly system that encouraged hacking to a sleek, sealed box that you are not supposed to open, and that dictates what hardware interfaces you are allowed to use. 1998: no more floppy disk. 2012: no more optical drive. The 12-inch MacBook has only a single USB Type-C port that supplies power, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, external storage, video output, and accessories. If you want to plug in more than one thing at a time and don't want to tote a herd of dongles and adapters around with you, too bad. Next up: The headphone jack. Yes, the one remaining non-proprietary standard hardware port in Apple-land is doomed. Read more