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Reviews

Google Nexus 5X review: the peoples' Android phone?

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Google
Reviews

The Nexus 5X is a brilliant phone, with only minor downsides. The biggest is lacklustre battery life. It generally lasts a day, but no more, which is disappointing.

The camera is excellent, the fingerprint scanner fantastic, it’s snappy, has a great screen and is both light and relatively small in a smartphone landscape dominated by phones with screens larger than 5.5in.

It’s well future-proofed, apart from the lack of wireless charging, and is excellent value. The Nexus 5X is arguably the best smartphone available for around £350, but buy the 32GB version as 16GB of storage just isn’t enough.

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GALPon Minino Another Lightweight Linux Distribution For 10+ Years OLD Computers

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Linux
News
Reviews
Ubuntu


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Here we have "GALPon minino" another Linux distribution that is based on Debian and designed for computers older than 10 years or more. The distro comes with LXDE Desktop Environment and a set of applications that fulfills the day-to-day needs of the users without slowing down the machine.
 

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Ubuntu 15.10, Codenamed Wily Werewolf, Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 15.10 as a operating system for Review is pretty lackluster. There’s nothing new as such and there’s nothing we can really say that is going to change your opinion from its predecessor, 15.04. Therefore, we recommend you to upgrade either out of habit and according to your regular upgrade schedule rather than out of a specific necessity for a specific feature of this release. Because there is really nothing that could possibly differentiate it from the older, yet still very stable 15.04 release. But if you’re going to stick with 15.04 for a little longer, we do recommend that you look at upgrading the kernel to the latest 4.2 branch. It is worth it.

If you really want a reason to upgrade? Linux kernel 4.2 would be our sole reason for taking Ubuntu 15.10 into consideration.

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Google Android 6.0 Marshmallow review: more polished, greater control and longer battery life

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Android
Reviews

The latest version of Android boosts battery life and adds new advanced search features making it Google’s most polished operating system yet.

Android 6.0 Marshmallow is already available on Google’s Nexus devices and LG and others have announced that they are bringing updates to their top-end smartphones within weeks.

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Chuwi Hi8 Tablet Review

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Android
Reviews

Recently I was contacted by Gear Best to review one of their tablets and I reluctantly agreed as I usually review products that I use or buy. They sent me a review unit and what I found in the package was quite surprising.

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Linux cousins Part 1: Reviewing AROS, the Amiga-like OS

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Linux
Reviews

Linux is great. It's fast. It's stable. It's free (in more ways than one).

But Linux (or, depending on who you ask, "GNU/Linux") isn't the only Free and Open Source operating system out there. Sure, it may be the most popular… but there are others. Over the next few articles I will be taking a look at some of the most interesting. One at a time.

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openSUSE Leap: Middle ground between cutting edge and conservative

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OSS
Reviews

One of the measures of a distro is how long it will stand behind its releases and on that score Leap is once again looking like a great release. The precise life cycle of Leap is still up in the air, but expect it to be a "long term support" style release, roughly mirroring SUSE Linux Enterprise.

At the very minimum, this Leap 42 release will be supported until Leap 43 arrives. Given that Leap 43 will be based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 13, which isn't due for at least two years, it's safe to say that Leap will last quite a while.

That said, do keep in mind that this is a beta. This release makes a good preview, but for day-to-day use, you'll want to wait for the final release (due November 4) before diving in with both feet.

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Liquid Lemur Linux Floats Fluid Desktop Design

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Developer Edward Snyder recently released the second alpha version of Liquid Lemur Linux 2.0. It offers a hybrid desktop experience that combines the Window Maker window manager with elements of the Xfce desktop.

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The friendly face of Linux Lite 2.6

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Reviews

I greatly enjoyed my time with Linux Lite 2.6. The distribution does a lot of things well, is easy to set up and use and the project offers us a lot of beginner friendly documentation. Linux Lite provides a great balance of speed, user friendliness, features and stability.

I like that Linux Lite manages to live up to its name by using few resources while still looking nice, the distribution manages to provide a stable base while shipping with up to date desktop applications and it offers good hardware support too. It is especially nice to see a distribution provide a control panel similar to the OpenMandriva Control Centre. This is one of the features I have most wanted to see adopted by distributions outside of the OpenMandriva family and it's nice to see Linux Lite take the lead on this one.

Lite ships with a good deal of functionality, providing users with most of the desktop software they are likely to need without, I'm happy to report, bogging down the application menu with a lot of extras, I feel a good balance was struck with regards to the default applications. Plus, I like that Lite offers us multimedia support out of the box.

Mostly, what I appreciated about Linux Lite was the distribution's sense of polish. I don't mean visually, though I did enjoy Lite's default look, I mean polish in the sense that the little details were addressed. Most distributions will have some small bugs or quirks or little annoyances. Perhaps too many notification messages or an application that won't launch or the software manager will not always run properly because PackageKit refuses to relinquish its lock on the package database. Linux Lite, by contrast, offered a smooth, pleasant experience. The one bug I ran into was with the system installer locking up when I attempted to use Btrfs as my root file system. Otherwise, I had a completely trouble-free experience with Lite. The documentation was helpful, the system was responsive, no applications crashed, there were no annoying notifications and the package manager worked as expected. I came away from my trial with Lite sharing the opinion that Linux Lite deserves more credit than it gets.

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Nexus 6P review: the best Android phone

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Android
Reviews

If you compare it to the other "premium" phones like the iPhone 6S, Galaxy S6, or Note 5, you're going to end up finding yourself putting a different set of things on your decision scales than before. With the Note 5: is a slightly better camera and a stylus worth $240 more, or would you rather have a clean Android experience? And the iPhone 6S: is iOS's superior app ecosystem and 3D Touch worth $150 more,7 or do you live in Google's ecosystem and want Google Now on Tap?

I'm not going to answer those questions for you here, only point out the remarkable fact that with the 6P, these are the questions now. Call it the premium category, call it the big leagues, call it whatever you what: the Nexus 6P and Google are competing at a different level than they did before. The Nexus was always a good Android phone, sometimes a great one, but never the best one.

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More in Tux Machines

ONAP Rolls Out Amsterdam Release

Less than nine months after AT&T and the Linux Foundation merged their open source projects to become the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), the group today rolled out its first code release, Amsterdam. The highly anticipated release, which integrates AT&T’s ECOMP and the Linux Foundation’s Open-O code bases into a common open source orchestration platform, aims to automate the virtualization of network services. Read more

Inspiring the Next Generation of Open Source

The Linux Foundation works through our projects, training and certification programs, events and more to bring people of all backgrounds into open source. We meet a lot of people, but find the drive and enthusiasm of some of our youngest community members to be especially infectious. In the past couple of months, we’ve invited 13-year-old algorithmist and cognitive developer Tanmay Bakshi, 11-year-old hacker and cybersecurity ambassador Reuben Paul, and 15-year-old programmer Keila Banks to speak at Linux Foundation conferences. In 2014 when he was 12, Zachary Dupont wrote a letter to his hero Linus Torvalds. We arranged for Zach to meet Linus–a visit that helped clinch his love for Linux. This year, Zach came to Open Source Summit in Los Angeles to catch up with Linus and let us know what he’s been up to. He’s kept busy with an internship at SAP and early acceptance to the Computer Networking and Digital Forensics program at the Delaware County Technical School. Read more

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Debian package depicts 'Tux the penguin' with sheep in intimate ASCII
    A Debian software package containing an "ASCII representation of zoophilia" has been installed automatically on some users' machines. According to a bug report, Debian user Felicia Hummel installed a package called "cowsay", which turns text into ASCII art of cows (or other animals) with speech or thought balloons. But with default settings of "install suggests" enabled, a controversial second "recommends" package called "cowsay-off" was also installed.
  • Join us at the Ubuntu Enterprise Summit!
    Bloomberg, Walmart, eBay, Samsung, Dell. Ever wonder how some of the world’s largest enterprises run on Ubuntu? This December, we are hosting our first ever Ubuntu Enterprise Summit to tell you how and help guide your own organisation whether it be running the cloud in a large telco to deriving revenue from your next IoT initiative. The Ubuntu Enterprise Summit is a two day event of webinars on December 5th and 6th where you can join Canonical’s product managers, technical leads, partners and customers to get an inside look at why some of the world’s largest companies have chosen Ubuntu. Whether you are focused on the cloud or are living life at the edge, the webinars will also look at trends and the considerations for your organisation when implementing such technologies. To kick off the event on December 5th, Canonical CEO and founder Mark Shuttleworth will deliver a keynote talk on 21st Century Infrastructure. Following Mark’s opening, there will be a series of other events and you can register now for those that spark your interest by clicking on the links below
  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 21 Nov 2017
    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.
  • Late Post For Ubuntu Community Appreciation Day 2017
    I am also very thankful for LaTeX2e and Tex Live. It has been a great thing to have to prepare devotional materials for church. I am thankful for the MOTU folks maintaining Gummi which is the editor I use on Xubuntu. Xubuntu is what I run on my laptop that goes many places with me. Tex Live is run both on the laptop and on the Raspberry Pi 2 at home.

Tizen: India, Games, Update