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Reviews

MANDRIVA 2007 PowerPack

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MDV
Reviews

Not many years ago, Linux users were pretty much computer geeks. The amount of software available was limited and most installs were from source code. It was from this simple premise that Mandrake was born.

Fedora Core 6 - A Cursory Glance (At What Looks Like A Great Distro)

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Reviews

I downloaded Fedora Core 6 yesterday, and had a good couple of hours today (I’m on holiday) to test it out - so here’s what I think of it.

Oracle Linux uncovered

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Linux
Reviews

Yesterday Oracle announced the release of their own version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, simply called Enterprise Linux or 'Unbreakable Linux'. Read on for a first-look, and the Linux Format team's opinions...

Review: Ubuntu Edgy is nice, but not so edgy

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu team is scheduled to release Ubuntu 6.10, codenamed Edgy Eft, today. After working with beta and release candidates over the last few weeks, I've found it to be a solid and usable upgrade for Dapper -- but not a particularly cutting-edge release.

Book Review: Building Flickr Applications with PHP

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Reviews

PHP, one of the most popular server side scripting languages has become the de facto standard in developing many of the high traffic websites around the world. The book "Building Flickr Applications with PHP" authored by Rob Kunkle and Andrew Morton is a unique book which aims to lessen the learning curve associated with developing Flickr applications with PHP.

Book review: Moodle E-Learning Course Development

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Reviews

Within the Education biosphere, there are a number of significant free software Course Management Systems. Moodle is one and a popular one at that. The book Moodle E-Learning Course Development by William H. Rice IV is a serious, practical guide to getting a Moodle installation off the ground and imparting the relevant knowledge required for a teacher or an administrator to create a well-balanced online PHP based learning environment.

Review: Slackware 11

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Reviews

Like many people who started using Linux in the mid to late 90's, my first distribution was Slackware. And I'm pleased to report that Patrick Volkerding's creation has withstood the test of time and is still going strong (and Patrick as well, fortunately). In these days when Ubuntu is hogging the spotlight (though much of this attention is truly merited), it's good to know that you can count on a distribution from the days when "men were men and they wrote their own device drivers" as Linus Torvalds once said.

Fedora Core 6 Review

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Reviews

I had pretty high expectations for Fedora Core 6 and in some ways they were met. FC 6 certainly is one of the best looking distro’s I have seen, especially for a default installation. but several smaller issue bugs that crept into FC 6 made me wonder how organized they really are. The problems I encountered with Fedora Core 6 were not huge issues, but there were enough smaller bugs that made me wonder if this release was rushed.

Also: Unfortunate start for FC6

Review: Sabayon Linux v3.1

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Reviews

This Gentoo-based distro is going to be one to watch. Rock-solid stability and endless flexibility, all wrapped into a 3.3GB LiveDVD environment packed to the brim with the latest builds of the latest software. So then, what makes Sabayon Linux so special? I'm glad you asked.

Fedora Core 6 Zod Review

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Linux
Reviews

After three last-minute delays, Fedora Core 6 is finally being pushed out the door this morning. Fedora Core 6 is codenamed Zod, and is being released seven months after the much anticipated and well-deserved launch of Fedora Core 5.

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IPA Font license added to license list

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Nouveau For Linux 3.18 Gains DP Audio, More Re-Clocking

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With Android One, Google puts itself firmly back in the OS' driving seat

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