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Reviews

Hello openSUSE

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Reviews
SUSE

As I outlined in my last blog entry, there was a definite sense of urgency in migrating from Freespire 1.0 to something else. The distribution I settled on was openSUSE Linux 10.1--mostly in part from the fact that it was newly released this week.

Review: Slackware goes to 11

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Reviews
Slack

Slackware Linux 11 was released at the beginning of this month, which marks 13 years of continued development. Slackware Linux, while not the first Linux distribution, is the oldest surviving one, and is starting to show signs of aging.

Review: Frugalware 0.5 (Siwenna)

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Linux
Reviews

Frugalware is an independent GNU/Linux distribution similar to Slackware, aiming at simplicity, speed and multimedia support. It features a wide software repository, managed by Pacman from Archlinux, which resolves dependencies and makes system updates easy.

Mandriva 2007 Review

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MDV
Reviews

Was it because of a bad strategy? Was its release cycle too long? Was it the controversy over Gael Duval being fired? Or was it just the lack of quality in its latest releases? Whatever it was, it disappointed a lot of people. The once most popular Linux distribution had now fallen far behind the leading Ubuntu, Fedora and Suse. A lot of its users were moving towards PCLinuxOS.

Sabayon Linux miniEdition looks sharp on the bleeding edge

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Linux
Reviews

Last week the Sabayon Linux project released ISO images of its miniEdition 3.1 live CD Linux distro. Sabayon has earned a reputation for running right on the cutting edge; it is the first distro to deploy a live CD using the Beryl compositing engine and Nvidia's newest beta video drivers.

Zenwalk Gnu/Linux 3

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Linux
Reviews

Zenwalk 3 is an operating system based on Patrick Volkerding’s Slackware GNU/Linux distribution, version 10.2. The entire operating system fits on a single CD, and stays true to what the author calls the “Zen philosophy”.

Mandriva Linux 2007 PowerPack Edition review

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MDV
Reviews

Though delayed for a while and later to market than most Mandriva fans would probably prefer, the new Mandriva Linux 2007 PowerPack Edition is finally here, nearly a year after the previous release.

Mandriva One Not the Linux Dinosaur of Old

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MDV
Reviews

I found early versions of Linux weren't very user-friendly, so this time around, I used my 7-year-old son as my test subject. I gave him a little lesson on how to use Mandriva One and off he went. On his own, he was able to boot up the machine and get himself online to his favorite kid Web sites without any problems at all -- meaning today's Linux has a short learning curve.

Book Review - The Official Ubuntu Book

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Reviews

The Official Ubuntu Book, brought to you by a number of folks who actively write or document Ubuntu and is a great book for those looking to move from OSX or Windows to Ubuntu. If you’re a novice or intermediate Ubuntu user then this book is for you. If you consider yourself an expert, you can still pick up a few things but most of what you’ll find here, you’ll already know.

Linux XP Desktop: A Windows face on an old Linux base

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Linux
Reviews

Late last month Linux-Online launched the English edition of Linux XP Desktop. The screenshots look pretty and amazingly similar to Windows XP. As a commercial distro for non-techie desktop users, does it do enough to challenge the likes of Linspire and Xandros?

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