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Reviews

Privacy and Tails 1.3

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Reviews
Security
Debian

Privacy and security are difficult to come by in our progressively connected world. Advertisers track our browsing habits, employers monitor productivity and government agencies monitor our communications. Most operating systems do not take steps to protect our privacy or our identities, two things which are increasingly difficult to guard. Tails is a Linux distribution that is designed to help us stay anonymous on-line and protect our identity. Tails is a Debian-based live disc that we can use to scrub our files of meta data, browse the web with some degree of anonymity and send private messages. According to the project's website, "Tails is a live operating system, that you can start on almost any computer from a DVD, USB stick, or SD card. It aims at preserving your privacy and anonymity, and helps you to: use the Internet anonymously and circumvent censorship; all connections to the Internet are forced to go through the Tor network; leave no trace on the computer you are using unless you ask it explicitly; use state-of-the-art cryptographic tools to encrypt your files, emails and instant messaging."

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Review: Lenovo X1 Carbon 3rd generation and Linux

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Considering that the fix for the first issue is widely available in most distributions and the second one is only a modprobe away, I’d say this laptop is pretty darned Linux compatible. I’m currently running Fedora 21 without any problems.

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Top 5 Open Source Email Clients For Linux

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Linux
Reviews

First Look at GNOME 3.16

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GNOME
Reviews

The highly anticipated GNOME 3.16 desktop environment for Linux kernel-based operating systems has been announced on March 26, 2015, and has been declared by the GNOME development team as the best GNOME release yet. Of course, we wanted to give GNOME 3.16 desktop environment a try and see for ourselves the new features, apps, and improvements.

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Leftovers: Screenshots

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Asus ZenWatch review: a sophisticated-looking Android smartwatch

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Android
Reviews

The Asus ZenWatch is a surprise. It is comfortable, looks great and works well. The heart rate monitor is well suited to infrequent checks, and the screen is bright and can be clearly read in sunlight.

Having to charge it at least every two days is a drag, but almost every other smartwatch short of the Pebble suffers from the same drawback.

The always-on ambient display mode using the OLED screen makes it a very good watch for actually telling the time, which others have neglected.

Overall, the ZenWatch is easily one of the best Android Wear watches available and a solid contender for the incoming Apple Watch.

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Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge Review: All Hail the New Android Smartphone Kings

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Android
Reviews

Samsung’s Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge flagship phones are finally here. They are beautiful phones (unlike the uninspired Galaxy S5). The S6 Edge, with its unique curved screen, is especially eye-catching.

But the S6 and S6 Edge have more than just good looks. Both pack powerful processors, gorgeous 5.1-inch displays, and the best smartphone cameras on the market.

Throw in a new mobile payment system that lets you use your S6 anywhere you can use a standard credit card, and the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge are the new Android smartphone kings.

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Leftovers: Screenshots

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Deepin 2014.2 review

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Deepin 2014 was a major release of Deepin (formerly Linux Deepin), a desktop distribution developed by some good folks in China. Though based on Ubuntu Desktop, the distribution features a custom desktop environment instead of the Unity Desktop of its parent distribution.

That desktop environment, which is called Deepin Desktop Environment, is what gives the distribution a very unique look and feel.

This is a cursory review of Deepin 2014.2, which is a point update to Deepin 2014. for a more detailed review of the 2014 releases, see Deepin 2014 review.

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More in Tux Machines

Fresh Supply of FOSS FUD

  • Think open source software is free? Think again… [Ed: Think open source FUD is dead? Think again… gymnastics in logic and cherry-picking]
  • Open Source: Not Pragmatic After All? [Ed: FUD that is repeating Microsoft talking points and dirty tricks in Munich, pretending that proprietary software never ceases development]
    Another open-source project, the Mozilla-backed (and Dipert-beloved) Thunderbird email client also mentioned as atypically thriving in my late-2012 blog post, is now also struggling. As is Firefox itself, which recently wound down its Firefox OS-for-smartphones efforts and is also facing browser add-on developer defections due to its embrace of Chrome-model APIs and other changes. Even mighty Linux is struggling with developer-induced bugs. Wonder if all this uncertainty is behind longstanding open-source poster child Munich, Germany's reconsideration of Microsoft products?
  • You Can’t Get Around Code Scanning if You Care About Open Source Licenses [Ed: Let's just pretend there are no issues associated with proprietary licensing, renewal, patching etc.]

DOD Adopts FOSS

Red Hat and Fedora

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux Foundation smushes two smaller projects together to form Open Networking Automation Platform
    The Linux Foundation announced yesterday that it had combined open source ECOMP and the Open Orchestrator Project into ONAP, the Open Networking Automation Platform, with the aim of helping users automate network service delivery, design, and service through a unified standard. Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation, said that ONAP should be a boon to enterprise IT departments, thanks to improved speed and flexibility.
  • Linux Foundation merges Open Source ECOMP, OPEN-O, further harmonizes virtualization group efforts
    Open source ECOMP and the Open Orchestrator Project (OPEN-O) have merged to create the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project, further harmonizing the ever-growing array of disparate virtualization groups. ONAP will allow end users to automate, design, orchestrate, and manage services and virtual functions.
  • I am a Cranky, White, Male Feminist
    Today, I was re-reading an linux.com article from 2014 by Leslie Hawthorne which had been reshared by the Linux Foundation Facebook account yesterday in honor of #GirlDay2017 (which I was regrettably unaware of until it was over). It wasn’t so much the specific content of the article that got me thinking, but instead the level of discourse that it “inspired” on the Facebook thread that pointed me there (I will not link to it as it is unpleasant and reflects poorly on The Linux Foundation, an organization which is in most circumstances largely benevolent).
  • encyclopedia snabb and the case of the foreign drivers
    Peoples of the blogosphere, welcome back to the solipsism! Happy 2017 and all that. Today's missive is about Snabb (formerly Snabb Switch), a high-speed networking project we've been working on at work for some years now. What's Snabb all about you say? Good question and I have a nice answer for you in video and third-party textual form! This year I managed to make it to linux.conf.au in lovely Tasmania. Tasmania is amazing, with wild wombats and pademelons and devils and wallabies and all kinds of things, and they let me talk about Snabb.