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Reviews

Review of Fedora 23

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Red Hat
Reviews

Fedora 23 Server can be whatever you want it to be. We put it to work as a simple web server. You can really go full steam ahead and install an entire LAMP stack, but we opted for a limited Lighttpd configuration instead. You could simply leave it on your network as a file server with out-of-the-box SSH access configured. Or you could get more tricky and put it into a full server role which would require a lot more in-depth configuration and detail than what we can cover in this Review. That’s before we have even brushed on its potential for Cloud options. It’s worth noting that this is all deployed and supported completely free of any contract fees associated with Fedora, unlike its big commercial partner, Red Hat.

Fedora 23 is great for small business who are looking at options for cutting down on IT costs related to software. If Fedora doesn’t suit the task at hand, we remind our readers not to forget about CentOS 7.0. Sure, Ubuntu is also an equal potential option with solid and reliable performance. But it’s difficult to look past Fedora’s fine polish and overall friendly take on a server operating system. Additionally, the simple fact that Cockpit is so well equipped and installed by default with the core system, makes Fedora 23 that little bit more tempting.

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Ubuntu 15.10 'Wily Werewolf' Released With New Features And Improvements Download Now

Filed under
Linux
News
Reviews
Ubuntu

ubuntu 15.10 wily werewolf available to download

Finally after the wait of approximately six months, wolf sharp teeth are ready to catch your computer with its extreme power. Ubuntu 15.10 'Wily Werewolf' has been made available to download with new features, alot improvements and fixes. Let's see what features this wolf has hunted down for us.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Nexus 6P Review: The Android Phone For Everyone

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Android
Reviews

Definitely. This is it. The Android phone for everyone. It does most of the regular phone stuff you do everyday better than everything else. This is the purest and most polished Android experience you’re going to get. Period.

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Android 6.0 (Marshmallow) review

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Android
Reviews

There will also be improved linking between apps, so you’ll see a lot less of that annoying screen that asks you to pick which app you want to use for a certain task. Certified apps will be able to ‘own’ links connected to them, for example by default the Twitter app will own Twitter links, and you’ll get taken straight to it should you click on one in a browser. You’ll be able to reassign these if you prefer another app, but by default it will be a far more seamless app-to-app and web-to-app experience.

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Android 6.0 Marshmallow review: All about polish and power

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Android
Reviews

When Android 5.0 Lollipop started hitting devices last November, people could tell. Google's new Material Design aesthetic made sure you wouldn't mistake it for any prior version of the OS, which was great... especially when you consider how confusing parts of it could be. Now that Android's look has been more or less firmed up, Google set about making its operating system smoother, smarter and more battery-friendly. The end result: Android 6.0 Marshmallow. So, how'd they do? Spoiler alert: pretty damned well.

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Google Nexus 5X review: the peoples' Android phone?

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Google
Reviews

The Nexus 5X is a brilliant phone, with only minor downsides. The biggest is lacklustre battery life. It generally lasts a day, but no more, which is disappointing.

The camera is excellent, the fingerprint scanner fantastic, it’s snappy, has a great screen and is both light and relatively small in a smartphone landscape dominated by phones with screens larger than 5.5in.

It’s well future-proofed, apart from the lack of wireless charging, and is excellent value. The Nexus 5X is arguably the best smartphone available for around £350, but buy the 32GB version as 16GB of storage just isn’t enough.

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GALPon Minino Another Lightweight Linux Distribution For 10+ Years OLD Computers

Filed under
Linux
News
Reviews
Ubuntu


Picture

Here we have "GALPon minino" another Linux distribution that is based on Debian and designed for computers older than 10 years or more. The distro comes with LXDE Desktop Environment and a set of applications that fulfills the day-to-day needs of the users without slowing down the machine.
 

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Ubuntu 15.10, Codenamed Wily Werewolf, Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 15.10 as a operating system for Review is pretty lackluster. There’s nothing new as such and there’s nothing we can really say that is going to change your opinion from its predecessor, 15.04. Therefore, we recommend you to upgrade either out of habit and according to your regular upgrade schedule rather than out of a specific necessity for a specific feature of this release. Because there is really nothing that could possibly differentiate it from the older, yet still very stable 15.04 release. But if you’re going to stick with 15.04 for a little longer, we do recommend that you look at upgrading the kernel to the latest 4.2 branch. It is worth it.

If you really want a reason to upgrade? Linux kernel 4.2 would be our sole reason for taking Ubuntu 15.10 into consideration.

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Google Android 6.0 Marshmallow review: more polished, greater control and longer battery life

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Android
Reviews

The latest version of Android boosts battery life and adds new advanced search features making it Google’s most polished operating system yet.

Android 6.0 Marshmallow is already available on Google’s Nexus devices and LG and others have announced that they are bringing updates to their top-end smartphones within weeks.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Gaming For Older/Lower-End Graphics Cards In 2018

A request came in this week to look at how low-end and older graphics cards are performing with current generation Linux games on OpenGL and Vulkan. With ten older/lower-end NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon graphics cards, here is a look at their performance with a variety of native Linux games atop Ubuntu using the latest Radeon and NVIDIA drivers. Read more Also: Wine 3.0 open-source compatibility layer now available

Red Hat Patch Warning

  • We Didn't Pull CPU Microcode Update to Pass the Buck
  • Red Hat Will Revert Spectre Patches After Receiving Reports of Boot Issues
    Red Hat is releasing updates that are reverting previous patches for the Spectre vulnerability (Variant 2, aka CVE-2017-5715) after customers complained that some systems were failing to boot. "Red Hat is no longer providing microcode to address Spectre, variant 2, due to instabilities introduced that are causing customer systems to not boot," the company said yesterday. "The latest microcode_ctl and linux-firmware packages are reverting these unstable microprocessor firmware changes to versions that were known to be stable and well tested, released prior to the Spectre/Meltdown embargo lift date on Jan 3rd," Red Had added.

Android Leftovers

Security: Updates, SOS Fund, IR, ME, and WPA

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Seeking SOS Fund Projects
    I’m spending some time over the next few days looking for the next round of projects which might benefit from an SOS Fund security audit.
  • Strong Incident Response Starts with Careful Preparation
    Through working every day with organizations’ incident response (IR) teams, I am confronted with the entire spectrum of operational maturity. However, even in the companies with robust IR functions, the rapidly evolving threat landscape, constantly changing best practices, and surplus of available tools make it easy to overlook important steps during planning. As a result, by the time an incident occurs, it’s too late to improve their foundational procedures.
  • The Intel Management Engine: an attack on computer users' freedom
    Over time, Intel imposed the Management Engine on all Intel computers, removed the ability for computer users and manufacturers to disable it, and extended its control over the computer to nearly 100%. It even has access to the main computer's memory.
  • What Is WPA3, and When Will I Get It On My Wi-Fi?
    WPA2 is a security standard that governs what happens when you connect to a closed Wi-Fi network using a password. WPA2 defines the protocol a router and Wi-Fi client devices use to perform the “handshake” that allows them to securely connect and how they communicate. Unlike the original WPA standard, WPA2 requires implementation of strong AES encryption that is much more difficult to crack. This encryption ensures that a Wi-Fi access point (like a router) and a Wi-Fi client (like a laptop or phone) can communicate wirelessly without their traffic being snooped on.