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Reviews

Google Nexus 6P Review - Android Overdose

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Android
Reviews

The Nexus 6P is clearly a flagship, but you could hardly say that just by looking at it. It does feature an aluminum case and other new-gen materials, but the Nexus 6P is barely distinguishable from the rest of the crowd. It’s an Android device and you can tell that from a mile distance.

All in all, Nexus 6P is a worthy competitor for the other flagships on the market, but only if you're a hardcore Android fan. And only if you look at the bigger picture. If you put it side by side with the rest of the market and compare every little detail, the Nexus 6P might lose in several key areas.

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Clementine Review - One of the Best Music Players on Linux

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Software
Reviews

There are a billion music players on the Linux platform and it's getting difficult to find a really good one that can bring something new. Fortunately, Clementine comes to the rescue.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Linux Mint 17.3 Cinnamon Edition

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Linux
Reviews

I am going to start this review with the new features in Linux Mint 17.3 so that those of you who are already well aware of Linux Mint and what it offers can skip the rest of the review.

The second part of the review will look at it more in depth, highlighting the features and the applications provided with Linux Mint.

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Xiaomi Mi4c: Awesome Android smartphone that doesn't break the bank [Review]

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Android
Reviews

These days you do not have to spend much to get a good smartphone. Using a Xiaomi Mi4c as my daily driver for the past couple of weeks has made it clear that you can get an impressive handset for just around $200. It is the sort of smartphone that makes you believe that you can have your cake and eat it too -- its specs read like those of some flagships while its price is similar to that of more affordable mid-rangers.

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System76 Oryx Pro is the Ubuntu Linux gaming laptop of your dreams [Review]

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Reviews
Gaming

When you think of a gaming PC, two things probably come to mind -- Microsoft Windows and desktop computers. In other words, gamers don't typically target laptops for playing their favorite games, and even when some do, they will likely aim for Windows 7, 8, or 10. Thanks to Steam, however, Linux-based operating systems are a legitimate option for gaming.

If you want a Linux-based gaming laptop, your choices are slim. Yes, you can buy a Windows laptop and replace the operating system with Ubuntu or another OS, but that isn't the best experience. Ideally, you want a machine that was designed and sold with Linux in mind. Enter the Ubuntu-powered System76 Oryx Pro. This beast of a gaming laptop can be configured with some jaw-dropping specs. The one I have been testing features an Intel Skylake Core i7 processor, 32GB of DDR4 RAM, NVMe SSD and NVIDIA graphics, including G-SYNC. Are you salivating yet? Read on for more specs and my impressions.

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Kevin Fenzi: How do you Fedora?

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Red Hat
Reviews

We recently interviewed Kevin Fenzi on how he uses Fedora. This is part of a series on the Fedora Magazine where we profile Fedora users and how they use Fedora to get things done. If you are interested in being interviewed for a further installment of this series, you can contact us on the feedback form.

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Manjaro 15.12 (Capella) KDE Review: Slow to Boot, But Stable & Beautiful

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Reviews

I love how Manjaro developers have presented the KDE Plasma 5.5 desktop. It’s a beautiful looking, responsive, power efficient, and a stable desktop. I’m also okay with it using a bit of memory as well. But you know, I can’t wait for 50+ seconds for an operating system to boot (again, part of that has to be blamed upon systemd developers) and 12.6 seconds of shutdown times is also a bit high for my taste, it just ain’t my cup of tea. I like lean & fast operating systems. But hey, that’s just me. And these days, one doesn’t get to see blisteringly fast booting KDE distributions either (in my short experience).

And, in my opinion, I’m still of the belief that GNOME developers are more insightful at seeing solutions from a technological point of view compared to the KDE developers, and I think this is the precise origin of this lag in performance of KDE, when the two desktop environments are compared.

Take MySQL as an example. Some KDE programs use it as their database handler. But the problem is, in its very essence, MySQL is designed to handle large number of data and thus is not optimized to have a small footprint. The now outdated search index service of KDE 4 known as Nepomuk required MySQL as a dependency. Thankfully, the new one in Plasma 5 called Baloo, according to its official page has a database engine of its own which has a small footprint. So it’s apparent that after a while KDE saw the mistake and corrected it.

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Oppo R7s review: Not the obvious choice for a mid-range Android, but ColorOS elevates it

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Android
Reviews

Oppo isn’t a particularly well-known name in many Western markets, and that’s hardly surprising considering the Chinese company hasn’t been around for as long as the bigger players. What it is known for is offering ‘bang for your buck’, and its latest R7s model is no different.

Priced at $399, it sits as a midway point in Oppo’s range – between the R7 and the R7 Plus – and goes up against similarly priced devices like the OnePlus 2, HTC One A9, and Nexus 5x, to name just a few.

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Moto 360 Sport review: Best Android Wear smartwatch for recreational runners

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Android
Reviews

The Moto 360 Sport is a solid Android Wear device for recreational runners who don't listen to music when they run and I award it an 8.0 rating.

If it played music as flawlessly as the Apple Watch, Samsung Gear S2 3G, or Sony SmartWatch 3 then I would consider buying one as my running watch. However, if you don't care about your heart rate and want an Android Wear device to run with and enjoy music then the older Sony SmartWatch 3 is the watch to buy.

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First Look at Solus 1.0, the Linux Operating System That Rules Them All

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Reviews

After a long wait and a few delays, the guys over at Solus, a groundbreaking Linux kernel-based computer operating system, have finally announced the release and immediate availability for download of Solus 1.0 on December 27, 2015.

Solus has been in development for quite some time now, and it was previously known to the world first as SolusOS, and then as Evolve OS. Because of some trademarking issues with the name Evolve, the distribution returned to its origins, and it is now dubbed Solus.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.

A GTK+ 3 update

  • A GTK+ 3 update
    When we started development towards GTK+ 4, we laid out a plan that said GTK+ 3.22 would be the final, stable branch of GTK+ 3. And we’ve stuck to this for a while. I has served us reasonably well — GTK+ 3 stopped changing in drastic ways, which was well-received, and we are finally seeing applications moving from GTK+ 2.
  • GTK+ 3.24 To Deliver Some New Features While Waiting For GTK4
    While the GNOME tool-kit developers have been hard at work on GTK4 roughly the past two years and have kept GTK3 frozen at GTK+ 3.22, a GTK+ 3.24 release is now being worked on to deliver some new features until GTK+ 4.0 is ready to be released. While GTK+ 4.0 is shaping up well and GTK+ 3.22 was planned to be the last GTK3 stable release, the developers have had second thoughts due to GTK+ 4 taking time to mature. Some limited new features are being offered up in the GTK+ 3.24 release to debut this September.