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Not quite answered: Can open source messaging servers replace Microsoft Exchange?

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Reviews

This week on Linux.com we reviewed Scalix, Open-Xchange, and Zimbra, three of the highest-profile open source alternatives to Microsoft Exchange. All of them have their defects, and all three offer commercial versions that make installation and maintenance easier than it is for their open source versions.

Linux XP 2006 SR2 - From Russia with Love???

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Linux
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So the other day I was reading the Weekly review on distrowatch.com and was checking out a recent tidbit on Linux XP that seems to have caused quite a stir on their site. Seems that for the past 7 days, Linux XP has surpassed Ubuntu for number one on their list. To quote Ladislav

BLAG - An Easy Way to Freedom?

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BLAG Linux with GNU is a small one CD distribution of the GNU/Linux operating system based upon Fedora Core. The version I'm taking a look at here, BLAG-500000, is based upon Fedora Core 5, with a bunch of packages added from third party sources.

Free Agent: The Latest Free Linux

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Linux
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Freespire is the new, cost-free alternative from Linspire. How well does it compete with the likes of Ubuntu's Dapper Drake?

Book Review: Moving to Ubuntu Linux

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This is the fourth book by Gagné I've reviewed over the past half-dozen years. Though I've found things to carp at in each of them, each one was a first-rate book. Here's another.

Review: Mesk Audio Player 0.2.1

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There are numerous audio players designed especially for GNOME. Single GnomeFiles repository lists over 60 of them. However, the problem lays in quality rather than quantity. Recently I’ve been looking for an audio player that would resemble the famous Windows player called Foobar 2000. I have found a lot of clones, and just a few original applications. Mesk audio player was among the latter.

Zenwalk 3.0

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Linux
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Zenwalk is a relatively uncommon distribution, with Ubuntu and Fedora appearing far more often in the news. However, its popularity seems to have steadily risen, accompanied by an extremely short distance between releases. While this means that new releases tend to be evolutionary rather than revolutionary, it helps them to constantly move forward. So, just how far has Zenwalk moved in the time between Zenwalk 2.6 and Zenwalk 3.0?

OpenOffice.org Writer

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A year ago, I bought a laptop that did not come preloaded with Microsoft Word. I needed a word processor and I didn't want to give Microsoft $200 for its bloated package of proprietary software, most of which I wouldn't use anyway. The first Word Processor I used was Word Perfect 5.1, with the blue text on a gray background, back when we thought it was cool to own a color monitor. My word processing needs have changed very little since then. Unfortunately, Microsoft has virtually monopolized the word processing market. Were there any other options?

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Beta 1: Look but Don't Touch

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The features Red Hat says will be in RHEL 5 sound great, but the promise was hard to prove in tests because of some system flakiness and omissions.

Book Review: SELinux by Example

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SELinux (Security Enhanced Linux) has been talked about for quite a while and been written about for almost as long. What is surprising is that there has never really been a book written that functions as a hands-on guide for its implementation in the real world. This despite the fact that it is supported in Red Hat, Debian, Gentoo, and others. SELinux by Example fills that void and does so admirably.

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Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

The boycotting of systemd has led to the creation of uselessd, a new init daemon based off systemd that tries to strip out the "unnecessary" features. Uselessd in its early stages of development is systemd reduced to being a basic init daemon process with "the superfluous stuff cut out". Among the items removed are removing of journald, libudev, udevd, and superfluous unit types. Read more

Android One: Let us fill you in on Google’s big game

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Mesa Gets Closer To Having OpenGL 4.0 Tessellation Support

A significant patch-set was published on Saturday night that implements the driver-independent bits of OpenGL 4's ARB_tessellation_shader extension inside Mesa. The tessellation support has been one of the big pieces missing from Mesa's OpenGL 4 implementation and fortunately it's getting close to mainline. Chris Forbes of Intel published fifty-six patches this weekend that implement the driver-independent portions of the extension inside Mesa. Of course, the driver portions still need to follow for it to be useful. Read more

Small Console Menu Utilities

One of the great strengths of Linux is the whole raft of weird and wonderful open source utilities. That strength does not simply derive from the functionality they offer, but from the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with applications. The Unix philosophy spawned a "software tools" movement which focused on developing concise, basic, clear, modular and extensible code that can be used for other projects. This philosophy remains an important element for many Linux projects. Good open source developers writing utilities seek to make sure the utility does its job as well as possible, and work well with other utilities. The goal is that users have a handful of tools, each of which seeks to excel at one thing. Some utilities work well on their own. This article looks at four tiny utilities that offer menu facilities. They get virtually zero coverage in the Linux press, so you may not have heard of them before, but they are well crafted and might just fit the bill. Read more