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Reviews

HP ProBook 455 G2: A low-cost business notebook for Ubuntu lovers [Review]

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Most of the laptops you can buy come with Windows pre-installed. Obviously the latest batch have Windows 10 on them, with more being announced daily. If you prefer Linux you can either replace Microsoft's operating system with your distro of choice, or set up a dual boot configuration.

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3 Twitter Clients For Linux That You Don't Want To Miss

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Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu
HowTos


3 twitter clients for linux and more

Do you use Twitter? Ofcourse. Do you access twitter through web browser to get notifications? Yes. Then you are missing out some great apps that can provide you the same features as web twitter client. There are numerous of twitter clients for Linux that notify on the desktopwhenever something happens on twitter. I'm compiling a list of 3 twitter clients for Linux that you will find very useful. So let's get started!

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Review: Ubuntu 15.04

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Perhaps that’s a sign that it’s time for Canonical to take the opposite tack to Microsoft and move to less frequent releases, or at least less arbitrarily timetabled ones. Ubuntu is stable enough now not to need constant updating, and in this case waiting on the Linux 4 kernel would have made for a much more compelling release. Canonical’s engineers, meanwhile, could benefit from spending more time working on long-promised upgrades, and less time patching and polishing half-baked versions of things for a biannual release.
If you’re looking for a free, friendly and powerful OS for desktops and servers, Ubuntu is still an easy Linux distribution to recommend. But even for established Ubuntu users this update is neither practically nor emotionally compelling. If Canonical seriously wants Ubuntu to make more of a mainstream impact, Ubuntu 15.04 – a barely necessary update rolled out to serve a timetable rather than a strategy – is precisely the sort of thing it needs to stop releasing.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Android x86 - Release 4.4 r3

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Android
Reviews

This review might not be very long but I have spent a long time playing and experimenting with Android x86 and if you stick with it and are willing to play with settings then you may get something close to desirable.

Those who will get the most out of Android x86 will be using a computer with a touchscreen.

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BackBox 4.3 review: Not just for penetration tests and security assessments

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Reviews
Ubuntu

BackBox is a Linux distribution that’s based on Ubuntu and designed for conducting “penetration tests and security assessments”.

If you’re not familiar with the distribution, this brief review will give you an idea what else it can be used for other than being an OS for pentesters.

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POLL - 5 Best Linux Desktop Environments With Pros & Cons

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Linux
Reviews


favorite linux desktop environment

I am sure all of you remember the 7/7/2015 post 5 Best Linux Desktop Environments With Pros & Cons. We all discussed the post in the comments and I really appreciate that LinuxAndUbuntu readers took part in discussion, mentioned their favorite(s) DE and also took poll. Today I'm going to reveal the poll taken by our readers and also the most liked DE in Comments.

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Linux Mint 17.2: tried and tested is never bested

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Reviews

When I booted into Linux Mint, I immediately saw how mature and smooth the distribution was. It was a breeze to open files, switch between windows and even type, with a GUI which didn’t look like it was designed in the 1990s. The high level of theme customisability and the gorgeous wallpaper selection enthralled me, and impressed me enough to make it the sole operating system on my old laptop.

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Android auto review: A beautiful, but beta alternative to awful OEM solutions

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Android
Reviews

Infotainment systems are actually the worst part of a modern car. In fact, a study by Nielsen and SBD Consultancy found the systems in new cars to be the biggest cause of customer complaints. Much like during the beginnings of the modern smartphone, the car infotainment trend takes a bunch of manufacturers that traditionally have only made hardware and asks them to create software. It should be no surprise that they are terrible at it. (And that says nothing of their typical sloth-ish product cycles.)

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Android TV Review: Just What Your TV Doesn't Need

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Android
Reviews

The latest Android-based smart TV platform – cunningly called Android TV – is by my reckoning Google’s third stab at becoming a force to be reckoned with in the smart TV world. Actually its fourth if you also include the early and little-seen Android 4.2 Jelly Bean effort introduced on a few high-end Philips TVs in a handful of European territories last year.

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The New Solus: Putting the Pieces Together Again The New Solus

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OS
Reviews

Perhaps what is the most significant trinket in Solus is the desktop creation built into it from scratch. The developer created the Budgie Desktop as a new Linux environment written from the ground up. Budgie has grown from its inception in SolusOS through Evolve OS. Designed with the modern user in mind, Budgie focuses on simplicity and elegance. It has a plain and clean style. It is easy to use.

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OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.