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Reviews

Chuwi Hi8 Tablet Review

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Android
Reviews

Recently I was contacted by Gear Best to review one of their tablets and I reluctantly agreed as I usually review products that I use or buy. They sent me a review unit and what I found in the package was quite surprising.

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Linux cousins Part 1: Reviewing AROS, the Amiga-like OS

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Linux
Reviews

Linux is great. It's fast. It's stable. It's free (in more ways than one).

But Linux (or, depending on who you ask, "GNU/Linux") isn't the only Free and Open Source operating system out there. Sure, it may be the most popular… but there are others. Over the next few articles I will be taking a look at some of the most interesting. One at a time.

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openSUSE Leap: Middle ground between cutting edge and conservative

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OSS
Reviews

One of the measures of a distro is how long it will stand behind its releases and on that score Leap is once again looking like a great release. The precise life cycle of Leap is still up in the air, but expect it to be a "long term support" style release, roughly mirroring SUSE Linux Enterprise.

At the very minimum, this Leap 42 release will be supported until Leap 43 arrives. Given that Leap 43 will be based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 13, which isn't due for at least two years, it's safe to say that Leap will last quite a while.

That said, do keep in mind that this is a beta. This release makes a good preview, but for day-to-day use, you'll want to wait for the final release (due November 4) before diving in with both feet.

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Liquid Lemur Linux Floats Fluid Desktop Design

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Developer Edward Snyder recently released the second alpha version of Liquid Lemur Linux 2.0. It offers a hybrid desktop experience that combines the Window Maker window manager with elements of the Xfce desktop.

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The friendly face of Linux Lite 2.6

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Reviews

I greatly enjoyed my time with Linux Lite 2.6. The distribution does a lot of things well, is easy to set up and use and the project offers us a lot of beginner friendly documentation. Linux Lite provides a great balance of speed, user friendliness, features and stability.

I like that Linux Lite manages to live up to its name by using few resources while still looking nice, the distribution manages to provide a stable base while shipping with up to date desktop applications and it offers good hardware support too. It is especially nice to see a distribution provide a control panel similar to the OpenMandriva Control Centre. This is one of the features I have most wanted to see adopted by distributions outside of the OpenMandriva family and it's nice to see Linux Lite take the lead on this one.

Lite ships with a good deal of functionality, providing users with most of the desktop software they are likely to need without, I'm happy to report, bogging down the application menu with a lot of extras, I feel a good balance was struck with regards to the default applications. Plus, I like that Lite offers us multimedia support out of the box.

Mostly, what I appreciated about Linux Lite was the distribution's sense of polish. I don't mean visually, though I did enjoy Lite's default look, I mean polish in the sense that the little details were addressed. Most distributions will have some small bugs or quirks or little annoyances. Perhaps too many notification messages or an application that won't launch or the software manager will not always run properly because PackageKit refuses to relinquish its lock on the package database. Linux Lite, by contrast, offered a smooth, pleasant experience. The one bug I ran into was with the system installer locking up when I attempted to use Btrfs as my root file system. Otherwise, I had a completely trouble-free experience with Lite. The documentation was helpful, the system was responsive, no applications crashed, there were no annoying notifications and the package manager worked as expected. I came away from my trial with Lite sharing the opinion that Linux Lite deserves more credit than it gets.

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Nexus 6P review: the best Android phone

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Android
Reviews

If you compare it to the other "premium" phones like the iPhone 6S, Galaxy S6, or Note 5, you're going to end up finding yourself putting a different set of things on your decision scales than before. With the Note 5: is a slightly better camera and a stylus worth $240 more, or would you rather have a clean Android experience? And the iPhone 6S: is iOS's superior app ecosystem and 3D Touch worth $150 more,7 or do you live in Google's ecosystem and want Google Now on Tap?

I'm not going to answer those questions for you here, only point out the remarkable fact that with the 6P, these are the questions now. Call it the premium category, call it the big leagues, call it whatever you what: the Nexus 6P and Google are competing at a different level than they did before. The Nexus was always a good Android phone, sometimes a great one, but never the best one.

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A Review Of Minimalist Hardcore Platformer INK

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Linux
Reviews

INK was released for Linux in August; two weeks after the Windows release. It took us a while to realize it was out though, so we first didn't cover it, and then forgot about it until now.

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Nexus 6P Review: This Is The Android Device That You’ve Been Waiting For

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Android
Reviews

But next year? Make your own phone, Google. You can do it. I feel like this is a massive competitive advantage for Apple. When you pick up one of the new iPhones, you can just tell that nobody had their grubby hands on any part of the device or OS design but Apple. It’s time to take the training wheels off for good, Google, and own the entire experience. After that, getting people to convert from other platforms will be a slam dunk.

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Android 6.0 Marshmallow review: Google Now is more important than ever

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Android
Reviews

After several days of using Marshmallow, you almost forget it's there: this feels more like Android 5.2 than 6.0. That's partly due to apps like Gmail and Google Maps getting updated separately, but partly due to the maturity of Android as a mobile OS. Perhaps from this point on, things like improved battery life, a smarter Google Now and a bunch of smaller tweaks will be big parts of each new edition of the software.

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Nexus 5X and Nexus 6P review: The true flagships of the Android ecosystem

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Android
Reviews

This year, we see a gap widening between Nexus devices and every other Android phone. If you're buying an Android device and want the fastest updates, the longest update support time, the best security program, zero crapware, the best software design, a cohesive app ecosystem, and the latest features from Google, you need to buy a Nexus. Every other Android phone pales in comparison to the Nexus 5X and 6P.

Before buying a Nexus meant you had to deal with a bad camera or poor battery life, but the Nexus 5X and 6P are the first Android devices with built with few-to-no compromises. The one thing you could complain about is the lack of wireless charging, but we can deal with that. The camera on a Nexus is finally good. The 12.3 MP cameras can hang with phones that are nearly twice the price of the 5X.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Tinder, FUD and KPTI Meltdown Mitigation

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Tinder vulnerability let hackers [sic] take over accounts with just a phone number

    The attack worked by exploiting two separate vulnerabilities: one in Tinder and another in Facebook’s Account Kit system, which Tinder uses to manage logins. The Account Kit vulnerability exposed users’ access tokens (also called an “aks” token), making them accessible through a simple API request with an associated phone number.

  • PSA: Improperly Secured Linux Servers Targeted with Chaos Backdoor [Ed: Drama queen once again (second time in a week almost) compares compromised GNU/Linux boxes to "back doors"]
    Hackers are using SSH brute-force attacks to take over Linux systems secured with weak passwords and are deploying a backdoor named Chaos. Attacks with this malware have been spotted since June, last year. They have been recently documented and broken down in a GoSecure report.
  • Another Potential Performance Optimization For KPTI Meltdown Mitigation
    Now that the dust is beginning to settle around the Meltdown and Spectre mitigation techniques on the major operating systems, in the weeks and months ahead we are likely to see more performance optimizations come to help offset the performance penalties incurred by mitigations like kernel page table isolation (KPTI) and Retpolines. This week a new patch series was published that may help with KPTI performance.

Purism News

  • February 2018 coreboot update now available
    Hey everyone, I’m happy to announce the release of an update to our coreboot images for Librem 13 v2 and Librem 15 v3 machines. All new laptops will come pre-loaded with this new update, and everyone else can update their machines using our existing build script which was updated to build the newest image. Some important remarks:
  • Purism Releases Updated Coreboot Images For Their Laptops
    Purism has released updated Coreboot images for their Librem 13 v2 and Librem 15 v3 laptops. The updated Coreboot images are now re-based to Coreboot 4.7, Intel FSP 2.0, IOMMU (VT-d) support is now available, TPM support is also enabled, and there are fixed ATA errors for 6Gbps speeds.
  • New Inventory with TPM by Default, Free International Shipping
    In November, we announced the availability of our Trusted Platform Module as a $99 add-on for early adopters, something that would allow us to cover the additional parts & labor costs, as well as test the waters to see how much demand there might be for this feature. We thought there would be “some” interest in that as an option, but we were not sure how much, especially since it was clearly presented as an “early preview” and offered at extra cost.

Mycroft AI on Plasma

Mycroft is running through the last 24 hours of the crowdfunding campaign for its Mark II assistant. The machine looks awesome and offers similar functionality to other proprietary alternatives, but with none of the spying and leaking of personal data. The Mark 2 will be delivered to backers at the end of this year, but you can enjoy the pleasures of giving orders to an AI right now by installing the Mycroft widget on Plasma courtesy of KDE hacker Aditya Mehra. Read more

Android Leftovers