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Reviews

Remix Mini review: A $70 Android desktop PC

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Android
Reviews

Overall, the Remix Mini makes a pretty compelling case that you can use Android as a desktop OS… or at least that you’d be able to do that if more app developers added desktop-friendly features to their apps. Even without any real help from app makers though, Remix OS does a pretty good job of making many smartphone and tablet apps feel like they’re supposed to run on a desktop computer.

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Linux Mint 17.3 Cinnamon screenshots

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Reviews

After a 3-day delay due to website-related issues, the Linux Mint development ream has finally made the official announcement – Linux Mint 17.3 has been released for you to download, use and enjoy.

ISO installation images (32- and 64-bit) for the Cinnamon and MATE desktops were made available for download.

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Also: Linux Mint 17.3 "Rosa" Cinnamon and MATE Officially Released - Screenshot Tour

Linux Mint 17.3 “Rosa” MATE released!

Zorin OS 10 review - Looking even better

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Reviews

Zorin OS 10 is ever so slightly better than its predecessor, which is how it should be really. It's a nice, simple, elegant, incremental update and improvement of the ninth release, and it gives a well-rounded, Windows-like experience to the user, with only a bit too much color contrast for its own good.

On the software side, most of the stuff works well, there are some silly issues here and there, but the core of it is available for immediate and satisfactory consumption. The big problem is probably Bluetooth. A few other key areas need fixing like updates, search, visual placement of GUI elements, some additional software choices, and alike. But nothing too major really. I'm being picky. 9.53/10. A decent one, worth testing. Enjoy.

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Sluggish Download and Install Subtract From Netrunner's Pluses

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Reviews

Netrunner Rolling 2015.11 version is a disappointing release. It seems sluggish and unimpressive right from the start.

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Review EXT4 vs. Btrfs vs. XFS

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Reviews

To be honest, one of the things that comes last in people’s thinking is to look at which file system on their PC is being used. Windows users as well as Mac OS X users even have less reason for looking as they have really only 1 choice for their operating system which are NTFS and HFS+. Linux operating system, on the other side, has plenty of various file system options, with the current default is being widely used ext4. However, there is another push for changing the file system to something other which is called btrfs. But what makes btrfs better, what are other file systems, and when can we see the distributions making the change?

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BlackBerry PRIV review: A new standard for Android in enterprise?

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Android
Reviews

PRIV is the first BlackBerry that doesn't run a version of the company's own OS. Instead, it runs Google's Android OS. It's a forward departure from what most of the world expects from BlackBerry today. It's aimed at the enterprise, and its productivity-focused users — but PRIV legitimately measures up to the most popular consumer devices. And BlackBerry put a sharp focus on privacy. (PRIV's name is a play on the phrase, privilege of privacy.)

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Qubes OS 3.0 (also KaOS 2015.10 and Plasma on Wayland and NetBSD 7.0)

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GNU
Linux
Reviews
Security

I am sorry to say I have tried each major release of Qubes OS released to date and, so far, none has installed successfully for me. I admire the goal of the Qubes project, making it easy for users to isolate separate tasks in order to improve security. I am of the opinion the concept of a user (and a user's processes) having full access to everything in a user's account raises security concerns. I would like to see more effort put into projects like Qubes and AppArmor in order to make it easier for a user to compartmentalize their digital life.

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A KDE loyalist tries Gnome

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KDE
GNOME
Reviews

I have been a Plasma user since 2011, when Ubuntu switched away from Gnome to Unity. Prior to that, since 2005, I had been a Gnome user. The transition from Gnome to Plasma was interesting because Gnome didn’t offer much customization and Plasma (it was called KDE back then) was all about customization.

Back in those days both Gnome and Unity were kind of half baked and KDE 4.x was fully mature. I loved it. I kept dipping my toes in the waters of Gnome and Unity while KDE moved from 4.x series to Plasma. Then with the recent openSUSE Tumbleweed, I decided to give Gnome 3.18 a try, and I was pleasantly surprised.

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Fedora 23 review: Skip if you want stability, stay to try Linux’s bleeding edge

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Red Hat
Reviews

Fedora 23 is such a strong release that it highlights what feels like Fedora's Achilles heel—there's no Long Term Support release.

If you want an LTS release in the Red Hat world, it's RHEL you're after (or CentOS and other derivatives). Fedora is a bleeding edge, and as such Fedora 23 will, as always, be supported for 12 months. After that time, you'll need to upgrade.

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The Nexus 6P takes Android smartphones to new heights (Review)

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Android
Reviews

Thanks to Huawei and Google, I have become a true fan of stock Android and simply do not desire to change to another smartphone which is a first for me. The Nexus 6P truly is premium and is a product that both should be tremendously proud of. Both companies should take a bow and we all should stand and applaud this device. With superior software, gorgeous and durable build, a super high resolution display, fantastic camera, a new fingerprint reader, dual-front facing speakers and incredible battery life, the Nexus 6P leaves no detail behind.

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Android Leftovers

Graphics: XWayland and Mesa

  • XWayland Gets Patches For Better EGLStreams Handling
    While the recently released X.Org Server 1.20 has initial support for XWayland with EGLStreams so X11 applications/games on Wayland can still benefit from hardware acceleration, in its current state it doesn't integrate too well with Wayland desktop compositors wishing to support it. That's changing with a new patch series.
  • Intel Mesa Driver Finally Supports Threaded OpenGL
    Based off the Gallium3D "mesa_glthread" work for threaded OpenGL that can provide a measurable win in some scenarios, the Intel i965 Mesa driver has implemented this support now too. Following the work squared away last year led in the RadeonSI driver, the Intel i965 OpenGL driver supports threaded OpenGL when the mesa_glthread=true environment variable is set.
  • Geometry & Tessellation Shaders For Mesa's OpenGL Compatibility Context
    With the recent Mesa 18.1 release there is OpenGL 3.1 support with the ARB_compatibility context for the key Gallium3D drivers, but Marek Olšák at AMD continues working on extending that functionality under the OpenGL compatibility context mode.
  • Mesa Begins Its Transition To Gitlab
    Following the news from earlier this month that FreeDesktop.org would move its infrastructure to Gitlab, the Mesa3D project has begun the process of adopting this Git-centered software.

Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04: Make yourself at GNOME. Cup of data-slurping dispute, anyone?

Comment Ubuntu 18.04, launched last month, included a new Welcome application that runs the first time you boot into your new install. The Welcome app does several things, including offering to opt you out of Canonical's new data collection tool. The tool also provides a quick overview of the new GNOME interface, and offers to set up Livepatch (for kernel patching without a reboot). In my review I called the opt-out a ham-fisted decision, but did note that if Canonical wanted to actually gather data, opt-out was probably the best choice. Read more

How CERN Is Using Linux and Open Source

CERN really needs no introduction. Among other things, the European Organization for Nuclear Research created the World Wide Web and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s largest particle accelerator, which was used in discovery of the Higgs boson. Tim Bell, who is responsible for the organization’s IT Operating Systems and Infrastructure group, says the goal of his team is “to provide the compute facility for 13,000 physicists around the world to analyze those collisions, understand what the universe is made of and how it works.” Read more