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Reviews

Ubuntu 15.04 Reviews

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Reviews
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 15.04 review

    If it’s spring, that must mean a new release of Ubuntu. This latest one is codenamed the “Vivid Vervet”, but – as has become common for Ubuntu releases – you’ll have to squint to spot the difference between this and last autumn’s “Utopic Unicorn”.

  • Ubuntu 15.04: Minor improvements, major controversy

    Ubuntu 15.04 has arrived, but not without a bit of controversy. Jack Wallen highlights what you can expect from the latest iteration from Canonical by way of drama and improvements.

Review: Linux Mint Debian 2 "Betsy" MATE

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Reviews
Debian

It has been over a year since I've reviewed Debian-based Linux Mint. Since then, some major changes have occurred. The most notable is that Debian-based Linux Mint is no longer a rolling-release distribution but is largely based on the upcoming stable release of Debian (version 8 "Jessie"), though it should continue to get updates for major applications like Mozilla Firefox. Given its shift to a new stable base, I figured it would be time for another review. I checked out the MATE 64-bit edition (due to certain issues with the 32-bit version not being able to detect multiple processor cores) on a live USB made with UnetBootin. Follow the jump to see what it's like. As with the previous review, I am linking to it and only highlighting changes.

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Leftovers: Screenshots

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Elementary OS Freya 0.3 review

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OS
Reviews

Elementary OS is a Linux desktop distribution that’s being primed as a “fast and open replacement for Windows and OS X.”

It’s safe to say that that’s the goal of every Linux distribution. Some distributions have, to a large extent, succeeded, while some are partially or completely misguided. Elementary OS, even though it’s still just at version 0.3, belongs to the first group.

Some of the design decisions make it slightly painful to use, but as a unit, the distribution is moving in the right direction. Will it ever get to the point where it replaces Windows and OS X for all users? No, because there’ll always be those that love Windows and Mac OS X no matter what. And there are still applications that have no real alternatives in Linux.

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Elementary OS 0.3 (Freya) Released – A Quick Review and Installation Guide with Screenshots

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OS
Reviews

Elementary OS is a Ubuntu based GNU/Linux distribution, which started as a theme and application set for Ubuntu. From eye-candy theme and wallpaper it turns out to be an independent Linux distribution. It inherits legacy of Ubuntu OS and shares Ubuntu’s software Center for package management. It is known for its lightweight nature which is low on resource that makes it easy to run on old PCS, simple yet effective user interface, beautiful themes and wallpaper serves as an eye-candy to users and one of the best Linux OS for Linux newbies.

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The Lenovo T450s Is Working Beautifully With Linux

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

A couple weeks ago I bought the Lenovo T450s, this is my first laptop-upgrade in about three years and I have to say... I am so glad that I did upgrade. Over the last two weeks I've been using the T450s as my daily-driver and its been working almost perfectly under Fedora Linux.

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GNOME 3.16: The Sleekest Linux Desktop to Date

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GNOME
Reviews

I’ve been an advocate of change on the Linux desktop for some time—at least until Ubuntu Unity came around. Once I started using Canonical’s entry into the desktop space, the race (for me) was over. Unity was my choice. I was fairly certain it would take a massive improvement on the desktop to get me to move away from my default.

That improvement might have come along—with the number 3.16. I’m talking about GNOME. The latest iteration of what was once the ruling king of the Linux desktop has made a strong case for wooing me away from Unity.

With that said, I wanted to take a moment to not just introduce you to the GNOME 3.16 desktop, but show you how to get a few things done with it. But first … what’s new?

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Encryptr Zero-Knowledge System Based Password Manager For Linux

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Linux
Reviews
HowTos


Encryptr zero knowledge based password manager

Encryptr is free and Open-Source password manager that is based on a very secure 'Zero-Knowledge Crypton Framework'. Zero-Knowledge system does not allow even a server to know what data is being sent and saved on the server by user. Encryptr saves all of your passwords, credit card data, PINs, or access codes, in the cloud with a simple and sleek user interface. The following tutorial instructs installing Encryptr on Ubuntu/Linux Mint or other Debian based distributions.

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Elementary OS Freya : Video Overview and Screenshot Tours

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Reviews

Elementary OS Freya is the latest release of Elementary OS. This release based on ubuntu 14.04 LTS featuring the latest version of pantheon desktop as the main desktop enviroment. Powered by kernel version 3.16, Gtk 3.14, and Vala 0.26.

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GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work
    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release. Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.
  • gresg – an XML resources generator
    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.
  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI
    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE

OSS Leftovers