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Review: Fluxbuntu nBuild1 Revision2

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is without a doubt one of the fastest growing desktop Linux distributions. It is so popular that it has sprouted many derivatives. One of which is Fluxbuntu.

A Quick Look at Damn Small Linux 3.0.1

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Linux
Reviews

By this point, everyone has heard of Damn Small Linux (DSL). When it comes to packing a full-featured Linux desktop environment into something as small as a pendrive, no one does it better than DSL. DSL uses Knoppix technology to boot and run from a live CD.

Sabayon Linux 3.2

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Linux
Reviews

It's been a full four months since we have taken a look at the "sequel" to the RR4 distro, Sabayon. Named after an Italian desert, I am not sure how that relates itself to Linux. Perhaps because it's a tasty distro? There's no denying that this is one of the most robust and fresh looking distros out there, so that may very well be the case.

openSUSE 10.2 RC 1 Report

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SUSE
-s

We're in the homestretch now. The only planned release candidate of openSUSE 10.2 was released a few days ago and final is expected to be released to the public on December 7. From this point on only showstopper and security bugfixes get integrated, so we are able to get a real good idea of 10.2 from this rc. I must say, from what I've seen, this is going to be a great release.

Book Review: Network Security Hacks: Tips & Tools for Protecting Your Privacy

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Reviews

Having time on my hands while waiting for Thanksgiving dinner (the turkey is slowly smoking on the barbecue as I write this), I pulled 'Network Security Hacks' from the stack and went to work.

MCNLive linux live cd distribution

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Linux
Reviews

MCNLive provides a well-rounded desktop operating system, with applications to meet all of the needs of regular users, and all the power of the well-established *drake family of config/ management tools, all built on top of a tested, reliable base.

Book review: Mambo - Visual Blueprint

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Reviews

The danger with Mambo and similar systems (such as PHP-Nuke), is that it's easy to just dive in and get something that sort-of works. The aim of the Mambo: Visual Blueprint is to provide readers with a fast way into configuring and getting the best out of Mambo.

Book review: OpenVPN: Building and Integrating Virtual Private Networks

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The product specific book OpenVPN Building and Integrating Virtual Private Networks is a thorough and detailed manual on achieving a realistic and successful deployment. The authors in depth personal knowledge is warmly encapsulated in the content.

A week with SuSE 10

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Reviews
SUSE

A series of events led me to installing a copy of Novell's Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 last week. Given the hype that Novell had made around the distribution I was expecting to be impressed. And I was.

Fedora Core 6: Beauty or Beast?

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Linux
Reviews

After the usual new-release downloading frenzy died down a bit, I downloaded the 3.3 gigabyte DVD .iso image, stoked the boiler of my test PC, and put Fedora Core 6 through its paces. My mission: to determine if FC6 is suitable for production systems, or if it's better suited as a bleeding-edge testbed.

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