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Firefox Fading, Ditching OpenOffice, and Containers

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Dissatisfaction with Mozilla's recent announcement to change its extension core code is being expressed across the Internet. Folks aren't happy. Elsewhere, Chris Hoffman explains why you should switch from OpenOffice to LibreOffice and the Canonical IP fight continues. In other news, several container headlines caught my eye recently.

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More on Munich, Linux Coming Out

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Last week's news of Munich considering a switch back to Windows has been clarified or rebuked today. Reports from DebConf15 refute the claims from certain city councillors complaining about the Ubuntu-based Linux. Nick Heath and Robert Pogson weigh in. Jack M. Germain chimed in today on his look at the life and times of Linux saying, "In honor of Linux's two dozen years of giving, LinuxInsider brings some gifts of praise to the party." Elsewhere, Red Hat was included in Forbes' Most Innovative Companies roundup this year.

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Happy Birthday Linux, Thank you Linus

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The twenty-fourth birthday of the Linux kernel was the top story today. Linux' birthday is widely celebrated on August 25, the day of Linus' original post, while others mark the birthdate as October 5, the day of the first public release. Lots of sites paid homage with several running through the time-line of its life. Elsewhere, a couple articles sang Open Source praises today and DarkDuck seemed confused by Knoppix.

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The Open Source Greatness of Linux

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Ubuntu grabbed a large portion of the headlines today with Canonical's decision to abandon its paid software for desktops to concentrate on mobile devices. The Everyday Linux User reviewed Mageia 5 and Distrowatch.com has added "Release Model" to their database search options. Elsewhere, Danny Stieben said Linux is so great because it's Open Source and Munich is consdiering switching back to Linux on some machines because folks said there were no text editors, Skype support, or office suites installed. All this and more in today' Linux news round-up.

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Weird Names, New Filesystem, and Strange Distros

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The top story today seems to be the announcement from ex-Googlite Kent Overstreet of a new COW filesystem for Linux. In other news, Major Hayden explained why Ethernet devices have such weird names in Fedora and Manuel Jose covered the strangest Linux distributions. Elsewhere, Christine Hall posted her review of Bodhi 3.1.0 and Dedoimedo loved Mint 17.2. A review of LibreOffice 5 rounds out the day.

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Moksha, LibreOffice, and Antergos Woes

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Headlines pretty much returned to normal today as LinuxCon concluded last night, but a few stories still trickled in. Elsewhere, Christine Hall pondered the future of new Bodhi desktop Moksha and Jack Wallen discussed the LibreOffice 5.0 interface. And finally, adventures in Antergos dominated my day.

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The Latest from LinuxCon

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LinuxCon was the talk of the town this week with their announcements dominating the headlines. In other news, Ian Murdock blogged about how he came to Linux with a big thanks to Linus himself. Speaking of Linus, he made several headlines with his Q&A at LinuxCon this morning. Antergos got an update today, after my not having much luck with the last release last night. Dedoimedo said the Cinnamon desktop isn't "all sugar and spice" and Matthew Garrett didn't get a satisfying answer on intellectual property from Shuttleworth at LinuxCon.

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Debian & SFC Tout Copyright Aggregation Project as Debian turns 22

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The Debian Project and the Software Freedom Conservancy today announced the creation of the Debian Copyright Aggregation Project. The project protects contributors' code by enforcing the license as necessary. This announcement comes as contributors descend upon DebConf15 and Debianites worldwide celebrate Debian's twenty-second birthday. In other Linux news, Sabayon posted on their development this year and Gary Newell wondered if there is life for Enlightenment now they've been dumped by Bodhi.

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Users Don't Care Windows 10 Spyware, It's Free

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Just when I thought there wasn't much else to say about new Windows 10, several more headlines jumped out at me. In KDE news, Jonathan Riddell posted on the shiny new Plasma 5.4 Beta, Boudhayan Gupta detailed the next generation KSnapshot, and David Both shared a comprehensive guide to Dolphin. Elsewhere, Matt Hartley posted a slideshow of the best browsers for Linux.

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FSF's 30th, GNOME's 18th, Kali 2.0, and Fedora 23a

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The Free Software Foundation today announced their 30th birthday party to take place in Boston, Massachusetts in October. Also celebrating is GNOME, who turns 18 this Saturday, August 15. Elsewhere, Kali Linux 2.0 was announced, but one early review says it's not ready. Fedora 23 Alpha arrived yesterday as well bringing "wide changes" and Italo Vignoli looks at the numbers from LibreOffice 5.0 a week after its announcement.

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More in Tux Machines

LILO Boot-Loader Development To Cease At End Of Year

While most of you probably haven't used the LILO bootloader in years in place of GRUB(2), the developer of "LInux LOader" intends to cease development at the end of the year. This summer's intern, Eric Griffith, pointed out today an undated message on the LILO homepage about the bootloader project planning to end development at the end of 2015. Read more

Systemd Takes Over su, FCC Bans Open Source Firmware

Paul Carroty posted Friday of the news that Lennart Poettering merged an 'su' command replacement into systemd and Fedora Rawhide - coming to a Linux system near you next. Elsewhere, Hackaday.com's Brian Benchoff said new FCC regulations just killed Open Source firmware replacement and Phoronix.com today reported that LILO is being abandoned. Several polls caught my eye today as did the new Linux workstation security checklist. Read more

Accelerating Scientific Analysis with the SciDB Open Source Database System

Science is swimming in data. And, the already daunting task of managing and analyzing this information will only become more difficult as scientific instruments — especially those capable of delivering more than a petabyte (that’s a quadrillion bytes) of information per day — come online. Tackling these extreme data challenges will require a system that is easy enough for any scientist to use, that can effectively harness the power of ever-more-powerful supercomputers, and that is unified and extendable. This is where the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center’s (NERSC’s) implementation of SciDB comes in. Read more

Open Source GPU now out

Hoping that MIAOW is not a catastrophe An open saucy general-purpose graphics processor (GPGPU) has been unveiled at the Hot Chips event. The GPGPU is relatively crude and is part of another piece of an emerging open-source hardware platform called MIAOW. Read more Also: Nvidia Linux Video Driver 355.11 Adds Experimental OpenGL Support to EGL