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Murdock Death Ruled Suicide, Terrible Linux Regressions

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CNN's Jose Pagliery today reported that Ian Murdock's death was officially ruled a suicide. Murdock, who founded Debian GNU/Linux in 1993, became despondent after a run-in with San Francisco police. He took to social media to accused police of brutally beating him and threaten suicide. Murdock was found hours later face down with an electrical cord tied around his neck. The investigator said he found no obvious signs of trauma although the autopsy directly contradicts that statement. Pagliery reported that no announcement had been made publicly and that the details of his body being covered in bruises only came out in the autopsy report obtained by CNN. "The autopsy records also note his body was covered in bruises -- on his chest, abdomen, back, arms and legs."

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Debian Bullseye, More Obnoxious Windows 10, Slack 14.2 Notes

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Today in Linux news Debian announced version 10 codename at DebConf16 currently in session. In other news Microsoft was just kidding about that whole easier-to-decline thing and Li-f-e may be switching base from openSUSE to Ubuntu. Elsewhere, several reviews warrant a mention besides Neil Rickert's and my own thoughts on Slackware 14.2.

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Mint 18 Released, No GUI Please, Atomic Host 7.2.5

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Today in Linux news, the Red Hat announcements kept on coming including the release of Red Hat Atomic Host 7.2.5. Elsewhere, Mint 18 in Cinnamon and MATE flavors was announced by Clement Lefebvre as promised. Bryan Lunduke just finished up 10 days using only a Linux terminal saying it "was too painful" and Eric Grevstad said using Linux and LibreOffice will change your life.

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Unrequited Microsoft, Red Hat in the Way, LinDoz

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Christine Hall penned an opt-ed today saying that she remembers Microsoft's dirty tactics, tactics they still employ while professing love for Linux. The media can fawn all they want, but Hall will never trust them. Elsewhere, Jack Germain said LinDoz is a "smooth Windows-Cinnamon blend" and Jamie Watson had nice things to say about KaOS 2016.06. Mint 18 Cinnamon and MATE editions are planned for this week and Red Hat said "RHEL is getting in the way."

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antiX 16 & OpenMandriva 3.0 Beta 2 Release, openSUSE Numbers

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It was a busy day in Linux with Slack, antiX, and OpenMandriva all working towards their next releases. Sam Varghese quoted Alberto Planas who said openSUSE sees about 1600 new installations each month and Gentoo's Donnie Berkholz posted his retirement notice. Bruce Byfield posted two interesting articles today, one explaining the difference between an Open Source user and a Free Software Activist and the other describing the stringent Debian packaging policies. As a bonus, a lady in California won a $10,000 award in small claims court from Microsoft over its Windows 10 behavior.

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Also: OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Beta2 is here!

New Releases!

libarchive Security Flaws, Novice Linux, Slack's Latest

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Today in Linux news several security flaws were found in libarchive, a library used to decompress several package types present on a great number of Linux systems. In other news Slackware-current has seen a lot of activity the last few days and Red Hat stock took a bit of dip in after hours trading this evening following an earnings report. Jamie Watson shared his recommendations of Linux distributions for novice users and Bruce Byfield today wrote that a lot of the things Windows users nostalgically miss are still a part of Linux.

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Fedora 24, openSUSE 42.2 Alpha, Snappy Coverage

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Fedora 24 was released today to many headlines and LinuxConfig.org posted the first official review. openSUSE 42.2 saw an alpha release today giving users a bit of a sneak peek. Interestingly, Matt Asay and Bruce Byfield both authored stories today on the press coverage of Canonical's Snap announcement - both saying the press believed the hype hook, line, and sinker.

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LibreOffice Getting Automatic Crash Reporting

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Markus Mohrhard cross-posted today on the Document Foundation blog of a new feature coming in LibreOffice 5.2. Mohrhard said, "Starting with LibreOffice 5.2 the LibreOffice project will have an automated crash reporting tool with server side analysis." In other news, GNOME's Sébastien Wilmet today blogged this thoughts on Mint's X-Apps, little applications commonly forked from GNOME apps and Sam Varghese reported on the exit of Jacob Appelbaum from Debian. Gizmodo listed five reasons to install Linux, and by Linux they mean Ubuntu, onto your laptop and Matt Hartley discussed why Ubuntu LTS is better than the latest and greatest.

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Red Hat Canonical Package Wars Claims Another Victim

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TechRights.org's Dr. Roy Schestowitz blogged today that Red Hat was "bashing the media" for covering Canonical's Snap packaging. In related news, Matthias Klumpp has suspended development of Limba, a cross-platform package management system similar to Flatpak, in deference to Snap and Flatpak. On Snap, Christine Hall touched on a thought that needs to be reported as well. On the other side of town, Dominique Leuenberger shared a bit of Tumbleweed news and Mike Saunders posted on the progress of the Document Liberation Project.

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Fedora 24 Final a GO, Snaps Not So Much

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Jan Kurik tonight announced that Fedora 24 is GO for release. Despite a couple of Windows 10 boot bugs the Fedora 24 RC 1.2 (20160614.0) compose is considered GOLD. In other news, Fedora developers aren't exactly overjoyed at the prospect of Snap packages for Fedora and they sure didn't cooperate with Canonical as implied. Besides the security risks, Fedora is backing xdg-app successor Flatpack. Elsewhere, KDE, GNOME, and The Document Foundation just got a lot chummier and Darknet.org joined in with the FSF to advise against the Intel Management Engine.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Firefox vs. Flash

  • Firefox to start blocking Flash content in August
    In Firefox 48, Mozilla will enable a new Firefox plug-in blocklist by default. Initially the blocklist will be small, mostly containing URLs of Flash SWF files that have been identified by Mozilla as supercookies (i.e. cookies that are very hard to shake off) or fingerprinting files (i.e. they scan your system and create a unique fingerprint, again usually for tracking purposes).
  • Firefox sets kill-Flash schedule
    Mozilla yesterday said it will follow other browser markers by curtailing use of Flash in Firefox next month. The open-source developer added that in 2017 it will dramatically expand the anti-Flash restrictions: Firefox will require users to explicitly approve the use of Flash for any reason by any website. As have its rivals, Mozilla cast the limitations (this year) and elimination (next year) as victories for Firefox users, citing improved security, longer battery life on laptops and faster web page rendering.

Security News

OSS Leftovers

  • Why Open Source is gaining momentum in Digital Transformation?
    Once upon a time in IT, using open source simply meant Linux instead of Windows, or maybe MySQL instead of Oracle. Now, there is such a huge diversity of open source tools, and almost every leading digital business and tech startup is making extensive use of them. It’s been a remarkable turnaround for open source over the last 10 years, placing the trend firmly at the heart of the digital revolution. The explosive growth of e-commerce, mobile and social media has completely altered the customer’s lifestyle and buying habits. Today, organizations are expected to engage with customers in Omni-channel environment. They need to create a customer journey. This is the driver of digital transformation.
  • Building an Open Source Company: Interview with GitLab's CEO
    Please note that while we think of ourselves as an open source company it would be more accurate to call it an open core company since we ship both the open source GitLab Community Edition and the close source GitLab Enterprise Edition. Thanks to paxcoder for pointing this out on Hacker News. GitLab began as a labor of love from Dmitriy Zaporozhets and Valery Sizov, who built the first version together in 2011. Like many open source authors, they were only able to work on the project part time. Sid Sijbrandij joined forces a year later and created GitLab.com, the first SaaS offering and first experiment with monetization. Today GitLab is a model for open source sustainability and stewardship. It is being used in over 100,000 organizations including RedHat, NASA, Intel, Uber, and VMWare, to name just a few. Large organizations buy enterprise licenses, sustaining and growing both the company and the free open source project. GitLab now has over 90 employees, including Sid and Dmitriy who serve as CEO and CTO, respectively.
  • You can now build your own Wire client
    Interview with Wire CTO and co-founder Alan Duric about open source.
  • 50 Top Open Source Marketing Applications
    Clearly, open source marketing apps have their place. These days, marketing departments are responsible for a sizable percentage of enterprise application purchases and deployment decisions. In fact, Gartner has predicted that by 2017 chief marketing officers (CMOs) will spend more on IT than chief information officers (CIOs) do. While the accuracy of that forecast is open to debate, marketing teams are certainly becoming more involved in the selection of software. The marketing automation industry alone is now worth an estimated $1.62 billion per year, and many marketing teams are also involved in choosing content management systems, customer relationship management, ecommerce software and other solutions.