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Fedora 23 EOL, Bye to FBDEV, Installfests of Yore

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With Fedora 25 safely out of the door, time has come to bid adieu to version 23. Users are urged to upgrade. Elsewhere, Robin Miller looked back at an activity that older Linux users may remember, the Linux installfest. Michael Larabel reported today that the kernel may drop framebuffer device drivers and Dustin Kirkland shared Ubuntu's security overview.

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Also: neon User LTS, openSUSE Upgrades, Best Distro Poll

Korora 25 Unleashed, Best KDE Distro, Notorious B.U.G.

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Fedora-based Korora 25 was released Wednesday in 64-bit versions. Users are urged to upgrade. Elsewhere, Jack Wallen was seriously impressed by Fedora 25 and blogger DarkDuck said ROSA R8 is "near-perfect." Bruce Byfield discussed obstacles to Linux security just as a new kernel vulnerability comes to light. Dedoimedo declared the best KDE distro of 2016 and FOSSBYTES has 10 reasons to use Ubuntu.

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Longer Fedora Cycles, 2017 Predictions, New Bodhi Guide

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The top story today was Fedora developers' considering lengthening their developmental cycles and releasing only once a year. Matthew Miller said "PR is a legitimate input into planning." Bryan Lunduke is back with his prognostications for 2017 and Bruce Byfield has seven tips for using Plasma. DistroWatch Weekly reviewed Fedora 25 and Roger Carter penned an extensive user guide for Bodhi Linux 4.0.

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Mageia 5.1 Released, Tumbleweed's Latest, Most Secure

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The Mageia project today announced the release of stopgap version 5.1, an updated "respin" of 5.0 and all updates. The Daily Dot posted their picks for the most sure operating systems and the Hectic Geek is "quite pleased" with Fedora 25. Matthew Garrett chimed in on Ubuntu unofficial images and Dedoimedo reviewed Fedora-based Chapeau 24.

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DistroWatch Rankings and openSUSE Happiness, Devuan is Two

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Today in Linux news the Devuan project is two years old while the world waits for its inaugural release. Jesse Smith was happy with openSUSE 42.2 saying, "openSUSE succeeded in providing a stable, responsive environment." Elsewhere, KDE and NTP are fundraising and OMG!Ubuntu! looked at the difference 10 years can make in a distribution's ranking. Canonical said today that Mir isn't only for Unity and a newly funded sci-fi game looks promising indeed.

systemd-less Devuan may have turned two recently, but the project has yet to release 1.0. As Phoronix.com's Michael Larabel noted a beta was released in April but the project has been a bit quiet since. Larabel also said that systemd "hate" has calmed down this year, implying interest has probably waned in a systemd-free alternative. I think folks might still be interested in testing a release if and when a stable version is announced.

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Korora 25 Upgrades, Mageia 6 Delays, Gift Ideas

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The Korora project announced a bit of good news for user waiting for the latest release while Mageia users will have to continue to wait. opensource.com published a gift buying guide for Open Source fans and it looks like the netbook is back is back. Gary Newell reviewed Q4OS 1.8 and makeuseof.com today reminded us of why we use Linux.

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Kubuntu Cautiously Good, openSUSE 42.2 Upgrade Smooth

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Today in Linux news, the Fedora project discussed some upcoming features in version 25, headed up by GNOME 3.22. Dedoimedo test drove Kubuntu 16.10 and found Plasma to be its greatest shortcoming, mirroring what I thought of the latest openSUSE. Speaking of which, Neil Rickert blogged his thoughts on the openSUSE 42.2 experience and Jim Dean imparted a bit of information for Korora users.

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openSUSE 42.2 Leap Released, Fedora 25 a GO

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openSUSE 42.2 Leap was released Wednesday, November 16, as scheduled. "openSUSE Leap 42.2 is made to give stability-minded users and conservative technology adopters peace of mind." On the other side of town, Fedora 25 was declared "GOLD" and it's all "GO" for release Tuesday, November 22. Paul Brown gave an overview and history of SUSE at Linux.com and The Document Foundation posted videos online of their 2016 conference.

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Mint 18.1 Pushed to December, Linux Dominates Supercomputing

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Linux first appeared on the TOP500 supercomputer list in 1998, which was populated mostly by Unix. Today Linux runs 498 of those top 500 supercomputers, proving once again that Linux is dominating the world. Elsewhere, Clement Lefebvre said the Mint 18 update will probably be pushed into December due to continuing work on Cinnamon 3.2. Turns out there was a bit more intrigue behind the Munich Linux desktop dump and Jonathon Riddell has issued a user upgrade advisory for KDE neon users.

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openSUSE Leap Goes Gold, Fedora 25 Delayed a Week

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Today in Linux news openSUSE 42.2 Leap has gone Gold Master in time for next Wednesday's release. On the other side of town Fedora 25 has been delayed a week, pushing its release to November 22, 2016. Sam Varghese and John Grogan reported on the latest from SUSECon 2016, with one covering a Red Hat spy in attendance. Eric Hameleers released his latest liveslak and ISOs. The Hectic Geek compared Ubuntu 16.10 flavors and Carla Schroder examined Ubuntu's enterprise chops.

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More in Tux Machines

Automating backups on a Raspberry Pi NAS

In the first part of this three-part series using a Raspberry Pi for network-attached storage (NAS), we covered the fundamentals of the NAS setup, attached two 1TB hard drives (one for data and one for backups), and mounted the data drive on a remote device via the network filesystem (NFS). In part two, we will look at automating backups. Automated backups allow you to continually secure your data and recover from a hardware defect or accidental file removal. Read more

5 open source strategy and simulation games for Linux

Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but those games are often not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist. So, can someone who only uses free and open source software find games that are polished enough to present a solid gaming experience without compromising their open source ideals? Absolutely. While open source games are unlikely ever to rival some of the AAA commercial games developed with massive budgets, there are plenty of open source games, in many genres, that are fun to play and can be installed from the repositories of most major Linux distributions. Even if a particular game is not packaged for a particular distribution, it is usually easy to download the game from the project's website to install and play it. Read more

Software: Virtlyst 1.2.0, Blender 2.8 Plan, Dropbox Gets Worse and DaVinci Resolve 15 Targets GNU/Linux

  • Virtlyst 1.2.0 released
    Virtlyst – a Web Interface to manage virtual machines build with Cutelyst/Qt/C++ got a new release. This new release includes a bunch of bug fixes, most importantly probably being the ability to warn user before doing important actions to help avoid doing mistakes. Most commits came from new contributor René Linder who is also working on a Bootstrap 4 theme and Lukas Steiner created a dockerfile for it. This is especially cool because Virtlyst repository now has 4 authors while Cutelyst which is way older has only 6.
  • Blender 2.8 Planning Update
    At this point we will not have a feature complete Beta release ready in August as we had hoped. Instead, we invested most of our time improving the features that were already there and catching up with the bug tracker. This includes making the viewport and EEVEE work on more graphics cards and platforms. The Spring open movie team is also using Blender 2.8 in production, which is helping us ensure the new dependency graph and tools can handle complex production scenes.
  • Blender 2.80 Now Coming In Early 2019 With Many Improvements
    The Blender 3D modeling software is facing a slight set-back in their release schedule for the big Blender 2.80 release, but it's moving along and they intend to have it ready by early next year.
  • Dropbox will only Support the Ext4 File System In Linux in November
    Dropbox has announced that starting on November 7th 2018, only the ext4 file system will be supported in Linux for synchronizing folders in the Dropbox desktop app. Those Linux users who have synch on other file systems such as XFS, ext2, ext3, ZFS, and many others will no longer have working Dropbox synchronization after this date. This news came out after Linux dropbox users began seeing notifications stating "Dropbox Will Stop Syncing Ext4 File Systems in November." You can see an example of this alert in Swedish below.
  • Dropbox scares users by shrinking synching options
    Dropbox has quietly announced it will soon stop synching files that reside on drives tended by some filesystems. The sync ‘n’ share service’s desktop client has recently produced warnings that the software will stop syncing in November 2018. Those warnings were sufficiently ambiguous that Dropbox took to its support forums to explain exactly what’s going on, namely that as of November 7th, 2018, “we’re ending support for Dropbox syncing to drives with certain uncommon file systems.”
  • DaVinci Resolve 15 Video/Effects Editor Released With Linux Support
    DaVinci Resolve 15 has been released by Blackmagic Design as the company's professional-grade video editing, visual effects, motion graphics, and audio post-production software.

How to display data in a human-friendly way on Linux

Not everyone thinks in binary or wants to mentally insert commas into large numbers to come to grips with the sizes of their files. So, it's not surprising that Linux commands have evolved over several decades to incorporate more human-friendly ways of displaying information to its users. In today’s post, we look at some of the options provided by various commands that make digesting data just a little easier. Read more