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Murdock Death Ruled Suicide, Terrible Linux Regressions

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CNN's Jose Pagliery today reported that Ian Murdock's death was officially ruled a suicide. Murdock, who founded Debian GNU/Linux in 1993, became despondent after a run-in with San Francisco police. He took to social media to accused police of brutally beating him and threaten suicide. Murdock was found hours later face down with an electrical cord tied around his neck. The investigator said he found no obvious signs of trauma although the autopsy directly contradicts that statement. Pagliery reported that no announcement had been made publicly and that the details of his body being covered in bruises only came out in the autopsy report obtained by CNN. "The autopsy records also note his body was covered in bruises -- on his chest, abdomen, back, arms and legs."

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Debian Bullseye, More Obnoxious Windows 10, Slack 14.2 Notes

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Today in Linux news Debian announced version 10 codename at DebConf16 currently in session. In other news Microsoft was just kidding about that whole easier-to-decline thing and Li-f-e may be switching base from openSUSE to Ubuntu. Elsewhere, several reviews warrant a mention besides Neil Rickert's and my own thoughts on Slackware 14.2.

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Mint 18 Released, No GUI Please, Atomic Host 7.2.5

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Today in Linux news, the Red Hat announcements kept on coming including the release of Red Hat Atomic Host 7.2.5. Elsewhere, Mint 18 in Cinnamon and MATE flavors was announced by Clement Lefebvre as promised. Bryan Lunduke just finished up 10 days using only a Linux terminal saying it "was too painful" and Eric Grevstad said using Linux and LibreOffice will change your life.

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Unrequited Microsoft, Red Hat in the Way, LinDoz

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Christine Hall penned an opt-ed today saying that she remembers Microsoft's dirty tactics, tactics they still employ while professing love for Linux. The media can fawn all they want, but Hall will never trust them. Elsewhere, Jack Germain said LinDoz is a "smooth Windows-Cinnamon blend" and Jamie Watson had nice things to say about KaOS 2016.06. Mint 18 Cinnamon and MATE editions are planned for this week and Red Hat said "RHEL is getting in the way."

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antiX 16 & OpenMandriva 3.0 Beta 2 Release, openSUSE Numbers

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It was a busy day in Linux with Slack, antiX, and OpenMandriva all working towards their next releases. Sam Varghese quoted Alberto Planas who said openSUSE sees about 1600 new installations each month and Gentoo's Donnie Berkholz posted his retirement notice. Bruce Byfield posted two interesting articles today, one explaining the difference between an Open Source user and a Free Software Activist and the other describing the stringent Debian packaging policies. As a bonus, a lady in California won a $10,000 award in small claims court from Microsoft over its Windows 10 behavior.

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Also: OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Beta2 is here!

New Releases!

libarchive Security Flaws, Novice Linux, Slack's Latest

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Today in Linux news several security flaws were found in libarchive, a library used to decompress several package types present on a great number of Linux systems. In other news Slackware-current has seen a lot of activity the last few days and Red Hat stock took a bit of dip in after hours trading this evening following an earnings report. Jamie Watson shared his recommendations of Linux distributions for novice users and Bruce Byfield today wrote that a lot of the things Windows users nostalgically miss are still a part of Linux.

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Fedora 24, openSUSE 42.2 Alpha, Snappy Coverage

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Fedora 24 was released today to many headlines and LinuxConfig.org posted the first official review. openSUSE 42.2 saw an alpha release today giving users a bit of a sneak peek. Interestingly, Matt Asay and Bruce Byfield both authored stories today on the press coverage of Canonical's Snap announcement - both saying the press believed the hype hook, line, and sinker.

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LibreOffice Getting Automatic Crash Reporting

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Markus Mohrhard cross-posted today on the Document Foundation blog of a new feature coming in LibreOffice 5.2. Mohrhard said, "Starting with LibreOffice 5.2 the LibreOffice project will have an automated crash reporting tool with server side analysis." In other news, GNOME's Sébastien Wilmet today blogged this thoughts on Mint's X-Apps, little applications commonly forked from GNOME apps and Sam Varghese reported on the exit of Jacob Appelbaum from Debian. Gizmodo listed five reasons to install Linux, and by Linux they mean Ubuntu, onto your laptop and Matt Hartley discussed why Ubuntu LTS is better than the latest and greatest.

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Red Hat Canonical Package Wars Claims Another Victim

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TechRights.org's Dr. Roy Schestowitz blogged today that Red Hat was "bashing the media" for covering Canonical's Snap packaging. In related news, Matthias Klumpp has suspended development of Limba, a cross-platform package management system similar to Flatpak, in deference to Snap and Flatpak. On Snap, Christine Hall touched on a thought that needs to be reported as well. On the other side of town, Dominique Leuenberger shared a bit of Tumbleweed news and Mike Saunders posted on the progress of the Document Liberation Project.

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Fedora 24 Final a GO, Snaps Not So Much

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Jan Kurik tonight announced that Fedora 24 is GO for release. Despite a couple of Windows 10 boot bugs the Fedora 24 RC 1.2 (20160614.0) compose is considered GOLD. In other news, Fedora developers aren't exactly overjoyed at the prospect of Snap packages for Fedora and they sure didn't cooperate with Canonical as implied. Besides the security risks, Fedora is backing xdg-app successor Flatpack. Elsewhere, KDE, GNOME, and The Document Foundation just got a lot chummier and Darknet.org joined in with the FSF to advise against the Intel Management Engine.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Hyper Is a Terminal Emulator Built Using Web Technologies
    A lot of us use the terminal on Ubuntu, typically from an app like GNOME Terminal, Xterm or an app like Guake. But did you know that there’s an JS/HTML/CSS Terminal? It’s called Hyper (formerly/also known as HyperTerm, though it has no relation to the Windows terminal of the same/similar name) and, usefulness aside, it’s certainl a novel proof-of-concept. “The goal of the project,” according to the official website, “is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards.”
  • Little Kids Having Fun With “Terminal Train” In Ubuntu Linux
    Linux is often stereotyped as the operating system for tech savvy users and developers. However, there are some fun Linux commands that one can use in spare time. A small utility named sl can be installed in Linux to play with the Terminal Train.
  • This Cool 8-Bit Desktop Wallpaper Changes Throughout The Day
    Do you want a dynamic desktop wallpaper that changes throughout the day and looks like the sort of environment you’d be able to catchPokemon in? If so, check out Bit Day wallpapers. Created by Redditor user ~BloodyMarvelous, Bit Day is a collection of 12 high-resolution pixel art wallpapers.
  • This Script Sets Wallpapers from Imgur As Your Desktop Background
    Pyckground is a simple python script that can fetch a new desktop background on the Cinnamon desktop from any Imgur gallery you want. I came across it while doing a bit of background on the Bit Day wallpaper pack, and though it was nifty enough to be of use to some of you. So how does it work?
  • Productivity++
    In keeping with tradition of LTS aftermaths, the upcoming Plasma 5.9 release – the next feature release after our first Long Term Support Edition – will be packed with lots of goodies to help you get even more productive with Plasma!
  • Core Apps Hackfest 2016: report
    I spent last weekend at the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. The agenda was to work on GNOME’s core applications: Documents, Files, Music, Photos, Videos, Usage, etc.; to raise their overall standard and to make them push beyond the limits of the framework. There were 19 of us and among us we covered a wide range of modules and areas of expertise. I spent most of my time on the plumbing necessary for Documents and Photos to use GtkFlowBox and GtkListBox. The innards of Photos had already been overhauled to reduce its dependency on GtkTreeModel. Going into the hackfest we were sorely lacking a widget that had all the bells and whistles we need — the idiomatic GNOME 3 selection mode, and seamlessly switching between a list and grid view. So, this is where I decided to focus my energy. As a result, we now have a work-in-progress GdMainBox widget in libgd to replace the old GtkIconView/GtkTreeView-based GdMainView.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Did Amazon Just Kill Open Source?
    Back in the days, we used to focus on creating modular architectures. We had standard wire protocols like NFS, RPC, etc. and standard API layers like BSD, POSIX, etc. Those were fun days. You could buy products from different vendors, they actually worked well together and were interchangeable. There were always open source implementations of the standard, but people could also build commercial variations to extend functionality or durability. The most successful open source project is Linux. We tend to forget it has very strict APIs and layers. New kernel implementations must often be backed by official standards (USB, SCSI…). Open source and commercial implementations live happily side by side in Linux. If we contrast Linux with the state of open source today, we see so many implementations which overlap. Take the big data eco-systems as an example: in most cases there are no standard APIs, or layers, not to mention standard wire protocols. Projects are not interchangeable, causing a much worse lock-in than when using commercial products which conform to a common standard.
  • Firebird 3 by default in LibreOffice 5.4 (Base)
    Lots of missing features & big bugs were fixed recently . All of the blockers that were initially mentioned on tracking bug are now fixed.
  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Comma.ai, Patches For Firefox and Tor, And OSS-Fuzz
  • Open Source Malaria helps students with proof of concept toxoplasmosis pill
    A team of Australian student researchers at Sydney Grammar School has managed to recreate the formula for Daraprim, the drug made (in)famous by the actions of Turing Pharmaceuticals last year when it increased the price substantially per pill. According to Futurism, the undertaking was helped along by an, “online research-sharing platform called Open Source Malaria [OSM], which aims to use publicly available drugs and medical techniques to treat malaria.” The students’ pill passed a battery of tests for purity, and ultimately cost $2 using different, more readily available components. It shows the potential of the platform, which has said elsewhere there is, “enormous potential to crowdsource new potential medicines efficiently.” Although Daraprim is already around, that it could be synthesized relatively easily without the same materials as usual is a good sign for OSM.
  • Growing the Duke University eNable chapter
    We started the Duke University eNable chapter with the simple mission of providing amputees in the Durham area of North Carolina with alternative prostheses, free of cost. Our chapter is a completely student-run organization that aims to connect amputees with 3D printed prosthetic devices. We are partnered with the Enable Community Foundation (ECF), a non-profit prosthetics organization that works with prosthetists to design and fit 3D printed prosthetic devices on amputees who are in underserved communities. As an official ECF University Chapter, we represent the organization in recipient outreach, and utilize their open sourced designs for prosthetic devices.

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