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Linux Discussion Continues, Fedora Welcomes Chromium

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Folks are still discussing the resignation of Sarah Sharp and Matthew Garrett from Linux kernel development. Jack Wallen said Sharp (and Garrett) are cases of more developers being "turned away, simply because developers had no patience for personal respect." He said Linux rules with a "sharp and iron tongue" with "foul and abusive language." He agreed with Dr. Roy Schestowitz in that all this is a "PR nightmare" threatening the "flagship of the open-source movement." He placed part of the blame on what he calls the "Internet of hate" and said if Linux is to compete with Microsoft and Apple its developers need to "start treating the legions of programmers, who are working tirelessly to deliver, as well as they treat the code itself. Open source is about community. A community with a toxic foundation will eventually crumble."

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Microsoft Ubuntu Rumors and Kernel Resignation Opinions

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The Linux Journal today addressed the Microsoft-buying-Canonical rumors saying it's against Ubuntu's founding principles. Reactions to the two kernel resignations this week are mixed and we'll take a look. Elsewhere, KDE signs the User Data Manifesto 2.0 and American Trade Journal looks at the business end of Red Hat lately.

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Kubuntu Council Welcomes New Members, Mageia 4 EOL

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Kubuntu Council member Philip Muškovac today announced three new council members replacing three recent losses including Jonathan Riddell. Mageia 4 is reaching end-of-life and Jamie Watson is back reporting if other Linux variants can handle his new Acer Aspire netbook. Elsewhere, John Grogan spoke with SUSE VP Michael Miller at LinuxCon about the future of SUSE and Linux.

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Also: New Kubuntu Council members

Riddell Answers Canonical with Own IP Policy

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In the latest salvo in the Canonical IP controversy, Jonathan Riddell today posted his own IP Policy. Elsewhere, the GNOME Foundation today posted support of an updated User Data Manifesto and SUSE today revealed some SUSECon 2015 plans. Phoronix reported Monday that ext3 will be removed from the kernel and Red Hat announced the release of 7.2 Beta.

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Google, Microsoft Create Alliance for Open Media

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The founding members are Amazon, Cisco, Google, Intel Corporation, Microsoft, Mozilla and Netflix. The goal is to "create a new, open royalty-free video codec specification based on the contributions of members, along with binding specifications for media format, content encryption and adaptive streaming." The word open is used many times in the announcement, but only once with source. Is "open" the same thing as "open source?" Roy Schestowitz at Tuxmachines.org doesn't think so. He organized the news of the AOM under the title "OpenWashing (Fake FOSS)."

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Also: Comments on the Alliance for Open Media, or, "Oh Man, What a Day"

Mozilla's mobile misstep puts the Web at risk

Firefox Fading, Ditching OpenOffice, and Containers

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Dissatisfaction with Mozilla's recent announcement to change its extension core code is being expressed across the Internet. Folks aren't happy. Elsewhere, Chris Hoffman explains why you should switch from OpenOffice to LibreOffice and the Canonical IP fight continues. In other news, several container headlines caught my eye recently.

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More on Munich, Linux Coming Out

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Last week's news of Munich considering a switch back to Windows has been clarified or rebuked today. Reports from DebConf15 refute the claims from certain city councillors complaining about the Ubuntu-based Linux. Nick Heath and Robert Pogson weigh in. Jack M. Germain chimed in today on his look at the life and times of Linux saying, "In honor of Linux's two dozen years of giving, LinuxInsider brings some gifts of praise to the party." Elsewhere, Red Hat was included in Forbes' Most Innovative Companies roundup this year.

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Happy Birthday Linux, Thank you Linus

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The twenty-fourth birthday of the Linux kernel was the top story today. Linux' birthday is widely celebrated on August 25, the day of Linus' original post, while others mark the birthdate as October 5, the day of the first public release. Lots of sites paid homage with several running through the time-line of its life. Elsewhere, a couple articles sang Open Source praises today and DarkDuck seemed confused by Knoppix.

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The Open Source Greatness of Linux

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Ubuntu grabbed a large portion of the headlines today with Canonical's decision to abandon its paid software for desktops to concentrate on mobile devices. The Everyday Linux User reviewed Mageia 5 and Distrowatch.com has added "Release Model" to their database search options. Elsewhere, Danny Stieben said Linux is so great because it's Open Source and Munich is consdiering switching back to Linux on some machines because folks said there were no text editors, Skype support, or office suites installed. All this and more in today' Linux news round-up.

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Weird Names, New Filesystem, and Strange Distros

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The top story today seems to be the announcement from ex-Googlite Kent Overstreet of a new COW filesystem for Linux. In other news, Major Hayden explained why Ethernet devices have such weird names in Fedora and Manuel Jose covered the strangest Linux distributions. Elsewhere, Christine Hall posted her review of Bodhi 3.1.0 and Dedoimedo loved Mint 17.2. A review of LibreOffice 5 rounds out the day.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

Nautilus – Looking into 3.20

3.20 it’s approaching, and we have mostly all the changes we wanted in place. I would like to explain them, so you are aware, and I would like you to test them and provide feedback before the UI freeze this week. So now it’s your time to change the way Nautilus will look and work for 3.20 and improve it for all us to enjoy it. Read more

Leftovers: OSS

  • Dispatches from FOSDEM, new survey data, and more OpenStack news
  • Open Source and .NET — Why It's Not Picking Up
    Open-source in .NET is not picking up. Despite good efforts from many good people and companies, it seems as if the Microsoft developers scene is far from embracing open-source. Why is this happening, and is there still hope for change? [...] But, this doesn't seem to be enough. OSS projects in .NET are not striving; there is not much innovation happening in this space; and OSS communities aren't being formed. It is all left as a dream we keep dreaming, but never actually getting to fulfil.
  • LLVM Clang 3.8 Compiler Optimization Benchmarks With -Ofast
    A few days ago I posted a number of LLVM Clang optimization level benchmarks using the latest code for the upcoming Clang 3.8 release. Those tests went from -O0 to -O3 -march=native, but many Phoronix readers wanted -Ofast so here are those results too. I didn't include -Ofast in the original tests since I don't know of many using this optimization level within a production capacity considering it has the potential of doing unsafe math as it disregards standards compliance in the name of performance. However, since several readers requested it and I still had this LLVM/Clang 3.8 build around in the same system configuration, I added in extra runs with -Ofast and -Ofast -march=native.
  • Texinfo 6.1 released
    We have released version 6.1 of Texinfo, the GNU documentation format.
  • A Simple Hangman Game Implemented In 3 Lines Of Python
    Today I’m sharing a clever implementation of Hangman in python by programmer Danver Braganza. Take a look at this 3-lines-long program and try to make it more compact.
  • GitHub is undergoing a full-blown overhaul as execs and employees depart — and we have the full inside story
    We've been hearing about a lot of drama going on at $2 billion startup GitHub, the hugely important and popular site used by millions of computer programmers where 10 or more executives have departed in recent months.