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Ubuntu 16.04 Beta, Red Hat Bears, Slacklive's Bear

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The release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS "final beta" in all its iterations and editions. Despite all the good news in Red Hat's latest financial report, its stock slipped 5% since Wednesday. Analysts have been all over the place in their ratings, but Jing Pan, B.Sc, MA said today the "bears are wrong." Speaking of bears, Eric "AlienBob" Hameleers announced a replacement server for his work, including Slackware Live.

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Fedora 24 Alpha a GO, DebConf16 Planning

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Fedora 24 is back on schedule with the decision to release Fedora 24 Alpha, postponed last week because of blocker bugs. Jan Kurik, Platform and Program Manager, said Wednesday the blockers were fixed and "Fedora 24 Alpha release is considered as GOLD." Elsewhere, the Debian project put out the call for event proposals for upcoming DebConf16 in South Africa this July.

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GNOME 3.20, the Right Desktop, LibO Designing

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The top story today was the release of GNOME 3.20, sure to be the next default desktop in several distributions. Elsewhere, the Electronic Frontier Foundation launched a new project for "activism and organizing" and Red Hat stock slips today. Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols offered some tip for choosing the right desktop and Bruce Byfield released his new LibreOffice book.

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KDE 5.6, ubuntuBSD, Red Hat Bucks

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Today in Linux news "a feature-packed" KDE Plasma 5.6 was announced with "improvements to the task manager, KRunner, activities, and Wayland support." A new project melds FreeBSD with Ubuntu to "escape from systemd" and ​Red Hat becomes first $2 billion open-source company. Getting Started with LibreOffice 5.0 is now available and Edubuntu may be on its last legs.

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Kicking Korora, Tumbleweed Report, OS X Over Linux

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Today in Linux news Stack Overflow published the results of their latest developer survey finding Mac OS X is more popular than Windows or Linux. Elsewhere, OpenSource.com ran an introduction to the Korora Linux distribution and Microsoft's patent bulldog is outta there. Dim* has this week's Tumbleweed review and Agam Shah looked at Dell's Linux strategy.

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Fedora 24 Alpha Delayed, Slackware 14.2 RC 1 Announced

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Fedora 24 Alpha due out next Tuesday has been delayed due to blocker bugs. Elsewhere, Patrick Volkerding‎ announced Slackware 14.2 Release Candidate 1 today saying, "We still have a bit of work to do." Mitch Wagner today said that "Open Source is killing us" and Charles Schultz reported on Mageia at SCaLE 14x.

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Also: Sadly, To Not Much Surprise, Fedora 24 Alpha Has Been Delayed

NVIDIA Linux, 8000 Signers, Linux Days

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Topping Linux news today is the rumor that NVIDIA is working on their own Linux distribution. Michael Larabel reported today of a new power management governor being developed for upcoming kernels and Mageia said they'd see you at Chemnitz Linux Days. Chris Sherlock offered tips for "LibreOffice newbies" and Microsoft claims 8,000 companies have signed up for SQL on Linux in the first week. "Docker puts containers on a diet" and the Linux Foundation is offering a free course on cloud infrastructure technologies.

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Also: Nvidia apparently working on Linux distribution

Slack Live 0.7.0, New YaST Features, Best Distros

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A new beta of Slackware Live was released today bringing new and exciting features. Elsewhere, Matt Hartley and Bruce Byfield teamed up to bring their "expert" picks for the best Linux distros and the FSF is gauging interest in a new free software workstation. Finally, the SUSE YaST Team posted another update on the progress of the YaST rewrite highlighting some new features.

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Also: New ISO images for Slackware Live Edition (beta 7)

Fedora's Wallpaper, Linux Gaming, CeBIT Live

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Today in Linux news, the Fedora 24 default Wallpaper was revealed. Elsewhere, GamingonLinux tried to calculate the number of Linux gamers while bloggers ran down their favorite games. Jesse Smith reviewed ReactOS and Matt Asay said "bugs are normal," and not the point. Opensource.com posted a list of FOSS podcasts and Italo Vignoli shared photos from CeBIT.

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LibreOffice 5.1.1 Fulfills 14 Year Request

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Italo Vignoli today announced the release of LibreOffice 5.1.1, the first update to 5.1 released last month. Today's release brings 83 bug fixes and one new feature that was originally requested in 2002. In other news, a new router was awarded the Free Software Foundation Respects Your Freedom certification and Dr. Roy Schestowitz is unhappy with the coverage of the Microsoft Linux love feasting this week. Several Solus and a couple of Korora reviews have popped up in recent days as well.

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More in Tux Machines

Why open source programming languages are crushing proprietary peers

It's no secret that open source now dominates big data infrastructure. From Kubernetes to Hadoop to MongoDB, "No dominant platform-level software infrastructure has emerged in the last ten years in closed-source, proprietary form," as Cloudera chief strategy officer Mike Olson reminded us. Read more

CORD becomes a Linux Foundation project

Central Office Re-architected as a Data Center (CORD), an open source integrated solutions platform for service providers leveraging merchant silicon, white boxes, and open source platforms such as Open Network Operating System (ONOS), OpenStack, Docker, and the cloud operating system XOS, is now part of the Linux Foundation as a new independent project. The Linux foundation is already home to many open source networking projects, including OpenDaylight and ONOS, so CORD is a natural fit for the non-profit foundation. Read more

Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system. Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system. Read more

Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

There's an old adage in the open source world – if you don't like it, fork it. This advice, often given in a flippant manner, makes it seem like forking a piece of software is not a big deal. Indeed, forking a small project you find on GitHub is not a big deal. There's even a handy button to make it easy to fork it. Unlike many things in programming though, that interaction model, that simplicity of forking, does not scale. There is no button next to Debian that says Fork it! Thinking that all you need to do to make a project yours is to fork it is a fundamental misunderstanding of what large free/open source projects are – at their hearts, they are communities. One does not simply walk into Debian and fork it. One can, on the other hand, walk out of a project, bring all the other core developers along, and essentially leave the original an empty husk. This is what happened when LibreOffice forked away from the once-mighty OpenOffice; it's what happened when MariaDB split from MySQL; and it's what happened more recently when the core developers behind ownCloud left the company and forked the code to start their own project, Nextcloud. They also, thankfully, dropped the silly lowercase first letter thing. Nextcloud consists of the core developers who built ownCloud, but who were not, and, judging by the very public way this happened, had not been, in control of the direction of the product for some time. Read more