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Fedora 21 Alpha, Project Mayhem, and Linus' Office

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There is so much news today I'm not sure which to highlight first. Linux.com has a look at Linus Torvalds' home office and a new paper describes fresh malware "Mayhem." X.Org Server 1.16 and GCC 4.9.1 have been released and the Plasma 5.1 development cycle has been officially kicked off. All this and some openSUSE, Ubuntu and Fedora tidbits here in tonight's Linux news.

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No Chaos KaOS, LibreSSL Fixed, and More KDE 5

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Today in Linux news, LinuxInsider said "KaOS calms down" that unruly KDE desktop. Several places are reporting that the "catastrophic" flaw in LibreSSL has been patched. Mutkware.com has a look at KDE Plasma 5 and Jos Poortvliet tries to clear up some of the naming confusion. Robert Pogson says his Linux desktop isn't broken, and there's more in tonight's Linux news review.

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KDE 5 is Here, LibreSSL Unsafe, and Debian 7.6 Released

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It looks like the big news today is the release of KDE Plasma 5. Arstechnica.com is reporting that 'OpenSSL fork LibreSSL is declared "unsafe for Linux."' Debian 7.6 was released over the weekend and a new developmental version of Opera for Linux was announced. And finally today, Amanda Dyar reports that Vanish, horror puzzle/adventure game, is available for Linux.

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Best Linux Desktop, FreeDOS Still Matters, and Darksiders

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In today's Linux news, Matt Hartley looks at 10 Linux distributions he likes and recommends. Arstechnica.com says DOS still matters and speaks with those still working on FreeDOS. Chin Wong rediscovers Opera and Jim Whitehurst discusses Red Hat. Raspberry Pi introduces a new board and Darksiders is rumored to heading to Linux. This and more awaits inside.

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KDE 5 Preview, Linux Survey, and the PC Lives

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In the thank-God-it's-Friday edition of our Linux news recap, Swapnil Bhartiya makes a video of KDE Plasma 5 in action. The guys from the Linux Voice run a survey trying to measure Linux user overlap. First release of OpenSSL fork LibreSSL gets a major release and The Var Guy says the PC isn't dead.

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"Among The Sleep" Broke, Fedora 21 Branched, and LXLE

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Today in Linux news, Adam Williamson posted that Fedora 21 has been branched off from Rawhide. GamingOnLinux is reporting that the wonderfully intriguing adventure game "Among the Sleep" is broken for most Linux users while Phoronix is reporting that Witcher 2 does. We have a review of LXLE as well as Katherine Noyes' 11 Ways LXLE "will make you forget all about XP." There's a wee bit of GNOME news and Andy Tannenbaum is retiring.

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RHEL 5.11 Beta, Gaming News, and Fedora Playground

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In today's Linux news, Red Hat announces the "beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.11." Several gaming posts caught my attention and Ryan Lerch says try out new kernel features in the new Fedora kernel-playground. The first Linux.com Linux poetry contest winner was announced and his poem posted. And another Deepin review pops up.

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NSA Code Faked, Desktop Linux is Dead, and Deepin Depths

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CentOS 7 was officially announced and Scientific Linux is pulling up the rear. There's more on the NSA targeting Linux users - someone says the NSA code was fake. Linux Deepin 2014 grabbed several headlines today and John Brandon said desktop Linux is dead in the enterprise setting. This and lots more in tonights Linux news report.

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Distrowatch Disappearance, RentOS 7 Coming, and OSS Lost

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In tonight's Linux news, Distrowatch.com went offline for much of Sunday. Serdar Yegulalp looks at the upcoming CentOS7, the first since joining hands with Red Hat officially. Bruce Byfield says Open Source has lost its way and is now wandering aimlessly with no purpose. And that's not all.

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More NSA Fallout, Linux Time Warp, and the Ultimate OS

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In tonight's news, the Linux Journal publishes more on the NSA surveillance of Linux users and the Electronic Frontier Foundation throws in their thoughts too. Wired.com has a look back at Linux including a funny video. And finally, Gary Newell asks if you want to help fund the ultimate operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

And now for some good news... How open source triumphed over Microsoft Office in Italy

Microsoft Office may have a global monopoly, but one Italian region rejected it flat out. But, why? In the stunningly beautiful Italian region of Umbria, you'll feel more at home running open source software, rather than the clunky and expensive Microsoft Office suite. Read more

Red Hat, Chilean government hold talks on open source initiative

The head of Chilean regulator Pedro Huichalaf agreed to pass information regarding the benefits of open source software to the ministerial committee for digital development Read more

IT teams are choosing open source - but not just for the cost savings

IT decision makers are increasingly turning to open source over proprietary software because they believe it offers them better business continuity and control Read more

Patent Troll Kills Open Source Project On Speeding Up The Computation Of Erasure Codes

Via James Bessen, we learn of how a patent trolling operation by StreamScale has resulted in an open source project completely shutting down, despite the fact that the patent in question (US Patent 8,683,296 for an "Accelerated erasure coding system and method") is almost certainly ineligible for patent protection as an abstract idea, following the Supreme Court's Alice ruling and plenty of prior art. Erasure codes are used regularly today in cloud computing data storage and are considered to be rather important. Not surprisingly, companies and lawyers are starting to pop out of the woodwork to claim patents on key pieces. I won't pretend to understand the fundamental details of erasure codes, but the link above provides all the details. It goes through the specific claims in the patents, breaking down what they actually say (basically an erasure code on a computer using SIMD instructions), and how that's clearly an abstract idea and thus not patent-eligible. Read more