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Bodhi 4.0.0 Time Line, First Woman Debian TC

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The top story today in Linux news is the controversy following the removal of Nano from the GNU umbrella. Original maintainer Christian Allegretta had to address the resulting rumors that threaten the community. Elsewhere, Jeff Hoogland posted an updated time line for Bodhi 4.0 and the Debian project welcomes its first woman Technical Committee member. Linus is on the hot seat again after losing his patience over commenting style and the Korora project is dropping their driver manager Pharlap.

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Linux at 25, Windows Alternatives, Tumbleweed Latest

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Today in Linux news Sandra Henry-Stocker looked at how far Linux has come since its humble beginnings 25 years ago. Elsewhere, Lifehacker.com has four alternatives to Windows 10 and Matt Asay wrote that Red Hat is the only profitable Open Source company because they sell piece of mind rather than software. Tumbleweed is poised to accept recently released Plasma 5.7 and Slackware received two security updates this week.

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Fedora PSA, Ubuntu EOL, Positive Mint Review

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Today in Linux news Adam Williamson issued a public service announcement concerning Fedora and Skyland systems. Elsewhere, Bruce Byfield said that graphical installers began the influx of the regular Linux user and Ubuntu 15.10 is approaching its end of support. My Linux Rig spoke to System76's James Blaede and The Hectic Geek said Linux Mint 18 is how a distro should be done.

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Murdock Death Ruled Suicide, Terrible Linux Regressions

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CNN's Jose Pagliery today reported that Ian Murdock's death was officially ruled a suicide. Murdock, who founded Debian GNU/Linux in 1993, became despondent after a run-in with San Francisco police. He took to social media to accused police of brutally beating him and threaten suicide. Murdock was found hours later face down with an electrical cord tied around his neck. The investigator said he found no obvious signs of trauma although the autopsy directly contradicts that statement. Pagliery reported that no announcement had been made publicly and that the details of his body being covered in bruises only came out in the autopsy report obtained by CNN. "The autopsy records also note his body was covered in bruises -- on his chest, abdomen, back, arms and legs."

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Debian Bullseye, More Obnoxious Windows 10, Slack 14.2 Notes

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Today in Linux news Debian announced version 10 codename at DebConf16 currently in session. In other news Microsoft was just kidding about that whole easier-to-decline thing and Li-f-e may be switching base from openSUSE to Ubuntu. Elsewhere, several reviews warrant a mention besides Neil Rickert's and my own thoughts on Slackware 14.2.

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Mint 18 Released, No GUI Please, Atomic Host 7.2.5

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Today in Linux news, the Red Hat announcements kept on coming including the release of Red Hat Atomic Host 7.2.5. Elsewhere, Mint 18 in Cinnamon and MATE flavors was announced by Clement Lefebvre as promised. Bryan Lunduke just finished up 10 days using only a Linux terminal saying it "was too painful" and Eric Grevstad said using Linux and LibreOffice will change your life.

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Unrequited Microsoft, Red Hat in the Way, LinDoz

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Christine Hall penned an opt-ed today saying that she remembers Microsoft's dirty tactics, tactics they still employ while professing love for Linux. The media can fawn all they want, but Hall will never trust them. Elsewhere, Jack Germain said LinDoz is a "smooth Windows-Cinnamon blend" and Jamie Watson had nice things to say about KaOS 2016.06. Mint 18 Cinnamon and MATE editions are planned for this week and Red Hat said "RHEL is getting in the way."

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antiX 16 & OpenMandriva 3.0 Beta 2 Release, openSUSE Numbers

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It was a busy day in Linux with Slack, antiX, and OpenMandriva all working towards their next releases. Sam Varghese quoted Alberto Planas who said openSUSE sees about 1600 new installations each month and Gentoo's Donnie Berkholz posted his retirement notice. Bruce Byfield posted two interesting articles today, one explaining the difference between an Open Source user and a Free Software Activist and the other describing the stringent Debian packaging policies. As a bonus, a lady in California won a $10,000 award in small claims court from Microsoft over its Windows 10 behavior.

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Also: OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Beta2 is here!

New Releases!

libarchive Security Flaws, Novice Linux, Slack's Latest

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Today in Linux news several security flaws were found in libarchive, a library used to decompress several package types present on a great number of Linux systems. In other news Slackware-current has seen a lot of activity the last few days and Red Hat stock took a bit of dip in after hours trading this evening following an earnings report. Jamie Watson shared his recommendations of Linux distributions for novice users and Bruce Byfield today wrote that a lot of the things Windows users nostalgically miss are still a part of Linux.

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Fedora 24, openSUSE 42.2 Alpha, Snappy Coverage

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Fedora 24 was released today to many headlines and LinuxConfig.org posted the first official review. openSUSE 42.2 saw an alpha release today giving users a bit of a sneak peek. Interestingly, Matt Asay and Bruce Byfield both authored stories today on the press coverage of Canonical's Snap announcement - both saying the press believed the hype hook, line, and sinker.

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today's leftovers

  • Another Million Learn About GNU/Linux
    Ordinarily, I would not notice or even recommend a brief article in a magazine but this is Popular Science, the Bible of DIY types especially the young and restless who might actually take the plunge into FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software). It’s a general magazine with a million subscribers.
  • Chromium 62 ready for download
    chromium_iconEarlier this week, Google released a security update for its chrome/chromium browser. The new version 62.0.3202.62 plugs the holes of 35 more or less serious issues, several of them have a CVE rating. When the topic of Chromium 62 came up in the comments section of a previous post, I mentioned that I was unable to compile it on Slackware 14.2. Errors like “error: static assertion failed: Bound argument |i| of type |Arg| cannot be converted and bound as |Storage|” yield some results when looked up on the Internet, and they indicate that Slackware’s own gcc-5.3.0 package is too old to compile chromium 62.
  • Playing with the pine64
     

    So I went for OpenBSD because I know the stuff and who to har^Wkindly ask for help. Spoiler alert, it's boring because it just works.

  • PrismTech Moves Market-Leading Proven DDS Solution to Open Source as Eclipse Cyclone
  • Nana Oforiatta Ayim’s Open-Source Encyclopedia of African History Starts With Ghana
    It is a rare kind of woman who enjoys a project so vast that it’s practically unfinishable, but Nana Oforiatta Ayim, a Ghanaian gallerist, writer, and historian, never quits what she has started. She’s discussing her work on the "Cultural Encyclopaedia", an attempt to “facilitate the re/ordering of knowledge, narratives, and representations from and about the African continent” through an online resource that includes an A-to-Z index and vertices of clickable images for entries. Eventually, a 54-volume book series—one for each country on the continent—will be published with selections from the encyclopedia's long, long list. Oforiatta Ayim is working with a small team of editors, and, starting with her native country, she has taken on the task of documenting all significant cultural touchstones in the thousands of years of African history. Plus, it will be open source to prevent it from having a top-down logic. “I’m a little bit crazy to take it on,” she says. “But if I’m not going to do it, who is going to be as crazy as me?”
  • The Only Person I’ll Pair Program with is my Cat
     

    I could argue (to varying degrees of success) that pair programming isn’t productive. Productivity of a practice is an easy thing to attack because, in our capitalist dystopia, it’s the end-all-be-all metric. But I hate pair programming, and it’s not just because I don’t feel productive. It’s a lot more than that.

  • Reaper: IoT botnet 'worse than Mirai' infects one million organisations worldwide
     

    Check Point first unearthed the botnet, codenamed 'IoT_reaper', at the beginning of September and claims that, since, it's already enslaved millions of IoT devices including routers and IP cameras from firms including GoAhead, D-Link, TP-Link, Avtech, Netgear, MikroTik, Linksys and Synology.

  • Google will pay out bounties for bad Android app flaws
     

    "Google Play is working with the independent bug bounty platform, HackerOne, and the developers of popular Android apps to implement the Google Play Security Reward Program. Developers of popular Android apps are invited to opt-in to the program, which will incentivize security research in a bug bounty model," says HackerOne.

today's howtos

Tried Elementary OS 0.4.1 Loki again - Negatory

The Linux desktop needs a reset. We're now in a post-Ubuntu world, with Unity gone, and we're back in sad and forlorn 2005. There isn't a single major project out there where you can look and say, wow, there's gonna be a fun and exciting year ahead of us. Well, maybe one or two. The rest? Just run-of-the-mill stuff. The forums are quiet, because there isn't anything to report, and rehashing kernel versions and desktop versions isn't really worth anyone's time. I think elementary OS represents this crisis quite well. On its own, it's a badly cobbled release, with too many issues and inconsistencies and a dreadful approach to ergonomics, making it useless to most people, all other things notwithstanding. But it was too buggy for me to even attempt to install it. Not going well. Alas, unless something cardinal changes, I cannot recommend this one at all. The combo of visual glitches, mediocre performance and middling hardware support does not warrant a longer adventure. Perhaps one day this will change, but for now, you're better off with stock Ubuntu. And by that I mean up to Zesty, ad I haven't tried Aardvark yet. Take care, and stay golden. Read more Also: Newbie's Guide to Ubuntu 17.10 Part 3

10 Reasons Why I Switched To Telegram Messenger

Whatsapp may be the best player in the game when it comes to instant messaging apps, but Telegram Messenger is the entire game itself. Read
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