Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

-s

Lotsa Gaming Stuff, RMS Message, Promising Distros of 2017

Filed under
-s

Most notable today and yesterday was the number of articles about Linux gaming. From console games to the most popular of the year, folks seem to be gaming out the end of 2016. Elsewhere, Tux4Ubuntu aims to bring the plucky penguin back to Ubuntu and Jack Wallen explored the "small footprint" LXLE. The Linux Experiment shared tips for Linux security and MakeTechEasier highlighted security with Firejail.

Read more

Year of Linux Desktop, Bluestar Report, LibO Extensions

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news Matt Hartley asked if 2017 just might be that fabled "year of the Linux desktop." Ada Ivanova has six suggestions in LibreOffice extensions while Bruce Byfield is afraid MUFFIN is "an over-hyped and misplaced effort." Christine Hall is back with more on Mint and I thought I'd share a few thoughts on my experience in Bluestar Linux.

Read more

Also: 2016 was the Best Year for Linux

OpenMandriva 3.01, Mint Nonreview, Fedora LXQt

Filed under
-s

Just before Christmas the OpenMandriva team announced an update to Lx 3.0 complete with Plasma 5.8.4 and Linux 4.9.0. Elsewhere, Christine Hall posted her review/non-review of Mint 18 and Gabriel Cánepa summarizes the top distros of the year. LinuxBSDos.com previewed Fedora 26 LXQt while Phoronix.com looked back at Fedora in 2016.

Read more

Also: OpenMandriva Lx 3.01 – our holidays gift

Fedora's Step-child, KDE Interviews, Debian Auto-Update

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news Debian is considering automatic updates on upcoming releases. Debian isn't the only distro considering the move as security concerns increase. Elsewhere, Dedoimedo interviewed KDE developers Sebastian Kugler and Bhushan Shah who said KDE Plasma is moving in the right direction. Shawn Starr said he's tired of KDE being treated like a red-headed stepchild over there at Fedora and Christian Cawley suggested five distros to try in a virtual machine.

Read more

Also: Debian considering automated upgrades

Debian Eyes Automatic Updates For New Installations

LibreOffice 5.2.4, Mint Upgrading, Weather Forecast

Filed under
-s

The Document Foundation is celebrating today with their release of LibreOffice 5.2.4. The announcement also teased upcoming LibreOffice 5.3 that will feature the new MUFFIN interface. Elsewhere, there seems to be some disagreement as to whether Mint's heart is in their upgrades and Jonathan Corbet published his latest Linux Forecast. A couple of sites have gathered some fun activities for the long boring holiday season and, in case you missed it, Fedora 23 reached its end of life Tuesday.

Read more

Best GNOME Distro, Linux All-in-One, PIXEL for PCs

Filed under
-s

Today was another busy day in Linux news with the top story being the release of Red Hat's third quarter 2017 financial report. Third quarter revenue missed analysts' expectations and cut full year forecast along with the resignation of CFO all added up to a rough night for Red Hat stock. Elsewhere, Raspberry Pi Foundation announced the release of PIXEL for PC and Mac and The Document Foundation introduced MUFFIN, a "tasty new user interface" for LibreOffice. Blogger Dedoimedo chose the best GNOME distro of the year and Andy Weir covered Acer's new all-in-one PC that's available with Linux.

Read more

Also: GTK 3.89.2 Released With Vulkan Renderer, Continued GDK/GSK Changes

5% Market Share, Linus Upset, Wonderful Bluestar

Filed under
-s

Monday was a busy day in the Linux world, there were way too many good headlines to cover. One of the more interesting was a prediction from Jack Wallen who said that Linux should reach 5% market share in 2017. Bad news is, vulnerability discoveries are liable to increase as well. Elsewhere, Mr. Wallen reviewed Bluestar Linux, an Arch derivative featuring a customized Plasma desktop, making it sound so good it will be my next experiment. The Register spotted another scolding from Linus Torvalds and blogger Dedoimedo said Fedora 25 GNOME is "an interesting distro." Bryan Lunduke revived old 1992 BBS gaming and Adobe released an update for Flash.

Read more

Debian vs. Fedora, MX Linux Team, 2016 Top Searches

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news Bruce Byfield compared and contrasted two of "the most influential Linux distributions of all time." While more alike than one imagines, Byfield outlined the differences as why to "pick one over another." Elsewhere, Dedoimedo interviewed the MX Linux team and discussed Xfce distributions in other posts. Michael Larabel reported today that the FBDEV maintainer has quit and Google blogged of the year's top searches.

Read more

Fedora 23 EOL, Bye to FBDEV, Installfests of Yore

Filed under
-s

With Fedora 25 safely out of the door, time has come to bid adieu to version 23. Users are urged to upgrade. Elsewhere, Robin Miller looked back at an activity that older Linux users may remember, the Linux installfest. Michael Larabel reported today that the kernel may drop framebuffer device drivers and Dustin Kirkland shared Ubuntu's security overview.

Read more

Also: neon User LTS, openSUSE Upgrades, Best Distro Poll

Korora 25 Unleashed, Best KDE Distro, Notorious B.U.G.

Filed under
-s

Fedora-based Korora 25 was released Wednesday in 64-bit versions. Users are urged to upgrade. Elsewhere, Jack Wallen was seriously impressed by Fedora 25 and blogger DarkDuck said ROSA R8 is "near-perfect." Bruce Byfield discussed obstacles to Linux security just as a new kernel vulnerability comes to light. Dedoimedo declared the best KDE distro of 2016 and FOSSBYTES has 10 reasons to use Ubuntu.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • Integrate Your Android Device With Ubuntu Using KDE Connect Indicator Fork
    KDE Connect is a tool which allows your Android device to integrate with your Linux desktop. With KDE Connect Indicator, you can use KDE Connect on desktop that support AppIndicators, like Unity, Xfce (Xubuntu), and so on.
  • FirstAid – PDF Help Viewer
    in the recent months, I didn’t find much time to spend on Kate/KTextEditor development. But at least I was now able to spend a bit more time on OpenSource & Qt things even during work time in our company. Normally I am stuck there with low level binary or source analysis work. [...] Therefore, as our GUIs are developed with Qt anyways, we did take a look at libpoppler (and its Qt 5 bindings), which is the base of Okular, too.
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-rc2 released
    After quite some delay, I finally assembled a second release candidate for KBibTeX 0.6.1. Version 0.6.1 will be the last release in the 0.6.x series.
  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM Next Month
    Next month is FOSDEM, the largest gathering of free software developers anywhere in Europe. FOSDEM 2017 is being held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th of February. Thousands of coders, designers, maintainers and managers from projects as popular as Linux and as obscure as Tcl/Tk will descend on the European capital Brussels to talk, present, show off and drink beer.

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?