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End of Apple, maddog Recovering, PCLOS Drops 32-bit

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Top new today in the Linux world is the recovery of Jon "maddog" Hall. Hall, a staunch supporter of Linux and Open Source, recently suffered a heart attack and is now recovering comfortably at home. PCLinuxOS announced the end of the 32-bit versions and Dimstar blogged the latest in Tumbleweed. Elsewhere, Paul Venezia said Apple is on the ropes and Neil Rickert said Microsoft clearly doesn't even care about security.

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Bodhi 3.2.1 Released, Open Source Evolution

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Jeff Hoogland today announced Bodhi Linux 3.2.1 with bug fixes for issues discovered since 3.2.0. Debian thanked Mythic Beast for a hardware load and Chris Hoffman wrote the Ubuntu BQ Aquaris M10 isn't "quite finished." Elsewhere, Sourceforge.net posted "The Evolution of Open Source" and Sam Varghese said today that the "day of reckoning" has arrived for BitKeeper's Larry McVoy.

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OpenMandriva Lx3 Forked, ZFS on Debian, H264 in Fedora

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The next OpenMandriva is one step closer to becoming a release this week as the cooker developmental branch was forked off to stabilize Lx3. Petter Reinholdtsen today announced that ZFS has been accepted into Debian "after many years of hard work" and Christian Schaller blogged H264 support is now available to Fedora users. In other news, LibreOffice 5.1.3 was released and Jack Germain reviewed Simplicity Linux.

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Mageia 6 Delays, Linux Longevity, Fedora CANTFIX

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Today in Linux news Mageia 6 is falling a bit behind schedule having missed a stabilization release and now delaying versions freeze. openSUSE Tumbleweed received an update to Plasma 5.6.3 and Red Hat announced their latest coup. Elsewhere, Bruce Byfield wondered how long desktop Linux can last considering the world's obsession with portables and Eric Nicholls wondered if Ubuntu can retain their "title of best desktop OS."

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Fedora 24 Beta and RHEL 6.8 Released

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Topping the Linux news today was the release of Fedora 24 Beta built with GCC 6 and glibc 2.23 and features GNOME 3.20. Parent company Red Hat announced an update to version 6 bringing "new capabilities and a stable and trusted platform." On the other side of town, Scott Gilbertson posted a detailed review of Ubuntu 16.04 and Ubuntu's Michael Hall shared his experiences using Unity 8 exclusively.

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Also: Fedora 24 Beta is out and ready to take you to Linux's future

Fedora 24 Beta Looks Nice, But Will They Ever Stop Mucking Up Anaconda?

Mageia 6 Artwork Contest, Debian Dumps i586, New Math

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Topping the Linux news today was Debian's decision to drop support for the 586-class of processors along with several others. In other news, Mageia announced the artwork contest for version 6 and Unixmen.com offered their list of top 10 Linux distributions for 2016. Elsewhere, Jack Germain liked using the new Vivaldi Web browser and Michael Larabel peeked ahead at some of the features coming in LibreOffice 5.2.

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Final Testing Slackware Live, Mint Removes Codecs

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Closing out the week Eric Hameleers today announced the final testing release of Slackware Live dubbed 0.9.0. In other news, Clement Lefebvre said today he was reducing the workload over there and axing OEM and NoCodec images, instead shipping no codecs for anyone. gNewSense 4 was recently released based on "a solid Debian" and the Hectic Geek compares and contrasts several flavors of Ubuntu.

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Fedora 24 Beta a GO, LibreOffice 5.0.6, No PPAs on Bodhi

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Jan Kurik announced the status of Fedora 24 Beta today, after being delayed last week due to wrong identification. In other news, The Document Foundation today announced the release of LibreOffice 5.0.6 with nearly 100 bug fixes. Jeff Hoogland addressed the PPA problem with Bodhi Linux and Dice said the future is bright for those seeking Open Source jobs.

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Also: Fedora 24 Beta Linux Approved for Landing on May 10, Final Release Ships June 14

Debian Handheld Pre-orders, GNOME Scores RH Servers

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Gadgets
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From (some of) the folks that brought you Pandora comes new Linux gaming handheld Pyra. Pre-orders are now being taken. The Free Software Foundation filed a comment with the U.S. Copyright Office calling for an end to JavaScript requirements on government websites. Red Hat recently donated two servers to the GNOME project and Nick Heath examined a draft of the Munich Open Source report. Douglas DeMaio posted of Tumbleweed updates and vulnerabilities in ImageMagick have webmasters scrambling.

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Linux or Bust, No Mir/Unity 8 this Fall

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More news out of the Ubuntu developers summit headlines today's Linux news. OMG!Ubuntu! reported today that "Yakkety Yak will ship the tired and dusty Unity 7 desktop." In other news Michael Larabel posted today of the developers' discussion surrounding FESCo's decision not to rebuild the full codebase for Fedora 25 and The Var Guy listed five reasons Linux is on the rise.

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More in Tux Machines

LXQt 0.12.0 Desktop Environment Released with Better Support for HiDPI Displays

The developers of the Lightweight Qt Desktop Environment (LXQt) were proud to announce today the release and immediate availability for download of the LXQt 0.12.0 desktop environment. Read more Also: LXQt 0.12 released With Better HiDPI Support, More Robust

GNOME 3.27.1 RELEASED

GNOME 3.25.1, the first unstable release in the 3.28 development cycle, is now available. The porting of more modules to meson continues (which is great!), but It's still causing some problems for some modules. See below. If you want to compile GNOME 3.27.1 by yourself, you can use the JHBuild modulesets available here: Read more Also: GNOME 3.27.1 Released

today's leftovers

  • Another Million Learn About GNU/Linux
    Ordinarily, I would not notice or even recommend a brief article in a magazine but this is Popular Science, the Bible of DIY types especially the young and restless who might actually take the plunge into FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software). It’s a general magazine with a million subscribers.
  • Chromium 62 ready for download
    chromium_iconEarlier this week, Google released a security update for its chrome/chromium browser. The new version 62.0.3202.62 plugs the holes of 35 more or less serious issues, several of them have a CVE rating. When the topic of Chromium 62 came up in the comments section of a previous post, I mentioned that I was unable to compile it on Slackware 14.2. Errors like “error: static assertion failed: Bound argument |i| of type |Arg| cannot be converted and bound as |Storage|” yield some results when looked up on the Internet, and they indicate that Slackware’s own gcc-5.3.0 package is too old to compile chromium 62.
  • Playing with the pine64
     

    So I went for OpenBSD because I know the stuff and who to har^Wkindly ask for help. Spoiler alert, it's boring because it just works.

  • PrismTech Moves Market-Leading Proven DDS Solution to Open Source as Eclipse Cyclone
  • Nana Oforiatta Ayim’s Open-Source Encyclopedia of African History Starts With Ghana
    It is a rare kind of woman who enjoys a project so vast that it’s practically unfinishable, but Nana Oforiatta Ayim, a Ghanaian gallerist, writer, and historian, never quits what she has started. She’s discussing her work on the "Cultural Encyclopaedia", an attempt to “facilitate the re/ordering of knowledge, narratives, and representations from and about the African continent” through an online resource that includes an A-to-Z index and vertices of clickable images for entries. Eventually, a 54-volume book series—one for each country on the continent—will be published with selections from the encyclopedia's long, long list. Oforiatta Ayim is working with a small team of editors, and, starting with her native country, she has taken on the task of documenting all significant cultural touchstones in the thousands of years of African history. Plus, it will be open source to prevent it from having a top-down logic. “I’m a little bit crazy to take it on,” she says. “But if I’m not going to do it, who is going to be as crazy as me?”
  • The Only Person I’ll Pair Program with is my Cat
     

    I could argue (to varying degrees of success) that pair programming isn’t productive. Productivity of a practice is an easy thing to attack because, in our capitalist dystopia, it’s the end-all-be-all metric. But I hate pair programming, and it’s not just because I don’t feel productive. It’s a lot more than that.

  • Reaper: IoT botnet 'worse than Mirai' infects one million organisations worldwide
     

    Check Point first unearthed the botnet, codenamed 'IoT_reaper', at the beginning of September and claims that, since, it's already enslaved millions of IoT devices including routers and IP cameras from firms including GoAhead, D-Link, TP-Link, Avtech, Netgear, MikroTik, Linksys and Synology.

  • Google will pay out bounties for bad Android app flaws
     

    "Google Play is working with the independent bug bounty platform, HackerOne, and the developers of popular Android apps to implement the Google Play Security Reward Program. Developers of popular Android apps are invited to opt-in to the program, which will incentivize security research in a bug bounty model," says HackerOne.

today's howtos