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End of Apple, maddog Recovering, PCLOS Drops 32-bit

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Top new today in the Linux world is the recovery of Jon "maddog" Hall. Hall, a staunch supporter of Linux and Open Source, recently suffered a heart attack and is now recovering comfortably at home. PCLinuxOS announced the end of the 32-bit versions and Dimstar blogged the latest in Tumbleweed. Elsewhere, Paul Venezia said Apple is on the ropes and Neil Rickert said Microsoft clearly doesn't even care about security.

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Bodhi 3.2.1 Released, Open Source Evolution

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Jeff Hoogland today announced Bodhi Linux 3.2.1 with bug fixes for issues discovered since 3.2.0. Debian thanked Mythic Beast for a hardware load and Chris Hoffman wrote the Ubuntu BQ Aquaris M10 isn't "quite finished." Elsewhere, Sourceforge.net posted "The Evolution of Open Source" and Sam Varghese said today that the "day of reckoning" has arrived for BitKeeper's Larry McVoy.

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OpenMandriva Lx3 Forked, ZFS on Debian, H264 in Fedora

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The next OpenMandriva is one step closer to becoming a release this week as the cooker developmental branch was forked off to stabilize Lx3. Petter Reinholdtsen today announced that ZFS has been accepted into Debian "after many years of hard work" and Christian Schaller blogged H264 support is now available to Fedora users. In other news, LibreOffice 5.1.3 was released and Jack Germain reviewed Simplicity Linux.

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Mageia 6 Delays, Linux Longevity, Fedora CANTFIX

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Today in Linux news Mageia 6 is falling a bit behind schedule having missed a stabilization release and now delaying versions freeze. openSUSE Tumbleweed received an update to Plasma 5.6.3 and Red Hat announced their latest coup. Elsewhere, Bruce Byfield wondered how long desktop Linux can last considering the world's obsession with portables and Eric Nicholls wondered if Ubuntu can retain their "title of best desktop OS."

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Fedora 24 Beta and RHEL 6.8 Released

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Topping the Linux news today was the release of Fedora 24 Beta built with GCC 6 and glibc 2.23 and features GNOME 3.20. Parent company Red Hat announced an update to version 6 bringing "new capabilities and a stable and trusted platform." On the other side of town, Scott Gilbertson posted a detailed review of Ubuntu 16.04 and Ubuntu's Michael Hall shared his experiences using Unity 8 exclusively.

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Also: Fedora 24 Beta is out and ready to take you to Linux's future

Fedora 24 Beta Looks Nice, But Will They Ever Stop Mucking Up Anaconda?

Mageia 6 Artwork Contest, Debian Dumps i586, New Math

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Topping the Linux news today was Debian's decision to drop support for the 586-class of processors along with several others. In other news, Mageia announced the artwork contest for version 6 and Unixmen.com offered their list of top 10 Linux distributions for 2016. Elsewhere, Jack Germain liked using the new Vivaldi Web browser and Michael Larabel peeked ahead at some of the features coming in LibreOffice 5.2.

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Final Testing Slackware Live, Mint Removes Codecs

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Closing out the week Eric Hameleers today announced the final testing release of Slackware Live dubbed 0.9.0. In other news, Clement Lefebvre said today he was reducing the workload over there and axing OEM and NoCodec images, instead shipping no codecs for anyone. gNewSense 4 was recently released based on "a solid Debian" and the Hectic Geek compares and contrasts several flavors of Ubuntu.

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Fedora 24 Beta a GO, LibreOffice 5.0.6, No PPAs on Bodhi

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Jan Kurik announced the status of Fedora 24 Beta today, after being delayed last week due to wrong identification. In other news, The Document Foundation today announced the release of LibreOffice 5.0.6 with nearly 100 bug fixes. Jeff Hoogland addressed the PPA problem with Bodhi Linux and Dice said the future is bright for those seeking Open Source jobs.

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Also: Fedora 24 Beta Linux Approved for Landing on May 10, Final Release Ships June 14

Debian Handheld Pre-orders, GNOME Scores RH Servers

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Gadgets
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From (some of) the folks that brought you Pandora comes new Linux gaming handheld Pyra. Pre-orders are now being taken. The Free Software Foundation filed a comment with the U.S. Copyright Office calling for an end to JavaScript requirements on government websites. Red Hat recently donated two servers to the GNOME project and Nick Heath examined a draft of the Munich Open Source report. Douglas DeMaio posted of Tumbleweed updates and vulnerabilities in ImageMagick have webmasters scrambling.

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Linux or Bust, No Mir/Unity 8 this Fall

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More news out of the Ubuntu developers summit headlines today's Linux news. OMG!Ubuntu! reported today that "Yakkety Yak will ship the tired and dusty Unity 7 desktop." In other news Michael Larabel posted today of the developers' discussion surrounding FESCo's decision not to rebuild the full codebase for Fedora 25 and The Var Guy listed five reasons Linux is on the rise.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • LinuXatUSIL – Previas 2 for #LinuxPlaya
    Damian from GNOME Argentina explained us some code based on this tutorial and the widgets in Glade were presented.
  • RancherOS v0.8.0 released! [Ed: and a bugfix release, 0.8.1, out today]
    RancherOS v0.8.0 is now available! This release has taken a bit more time than prior versions, as we’ve been laying more groundwork to allow us to do much faster updates, and to release more often.
  • The Technicals For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell An Interesting Tale
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Released | New Features And Download
    Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Beta 1 release is finally here. If you’re interested, you can go ahead and download the ISO images of the participating flavors, which are, Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio. Powered by Linux kernel 4.10, these releases feature the latest stable versions of their respective desktop environments. This release will be followed by the Final Beta release on March 23 and final release on April 13.
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Now Available to Download
    The first beta releases in the Ubuntu 17.04 development cycle are ready for testing, with Xubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME and Ubuntu Budgie among the flavors taking part.

FOSS Policies

Leftovers: BSD

Security Leftovers

  • Stop using SHA1 encryption: It’s now completely unsafe, Google proves
    Security researchers have achieved the first real-world collision attack against the SHA-1 hash function, producing two different PDF files with the same SHA-1 signature. This shows that the algorithm's use for security-sensitive functions should be discontinued as soon as possible. SHA-1 (Secure Hash Algorithm 1) dates back to 1995 and has been known to be vulnerable to theoretical attacks since 2005. The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology has banned the use of SHA-1 by U.S. federal agencies since 2010, and digital certificate authorities have not been allowed to issue SHA-1-signed certificates since Jan. 1, 2016, although some exemptions have been made. However, despite these efforts to phase out the use of SHA-1 in some areas, the algorithm is still fairly widely used to validate credit card transactions, electronic documents, email PGP/GPG signatures, open-source software repositories, backups and software updates.
  • on pgp
    First and foremost I have to pay respect to PGP, it was an important weapon in the first cryptowar. It has helped many whistleblowers and dissidents. It is software with quite interesting history, if all the cryptograms could tell... PGP is also deeply misunderstood, it is a highly successful political tool. It was essential in getting crypto out to the people. In my view PGP is not dead, it's just old and misunderstood and needs to be retired in honor. However the world has changed from the internet happy times of the '90s, from a passive adversary to many active ones - with cheap commercially available malware as turn-key-solutions, intrusive apps, malware, NSLs, gag orders, etc.
  • Cloudflare’s Cloudbleed is the worst privacy leak in recent Internet history
    Cloudflare revealed today that, for months, all of its protected websites were potentially leaking private information across the Internet. Specifically, Cloudflare’s reverse proxies were dumping uninitialized memory; that is to say, bleeding private data. The issue, termed Cloudbleed by some (but not its discoverer Tavis Ormandy of Google Project Zero), is the greatest privacy leak of 2017 and the year has just started. For months, since 2016-09-22 by their own admission, CloudFlare has been leaking private information through Cloudbleed. Basically, random data from random sites (again, it’s worth mentioning that every site that used CloudFlare in the last half year should be considered to having fallen victim to this) would be randomly distributed across the open Internet, and then indefinitely cached along the way.
  • Serious Cloudflare bug exposed a potpourri of secret customer data
    Cloudflare, a service that helps optimize the security and performance of more than 5.5 million websites, warned customers today that a recently fixed software bug exposed a range of sensitive information that could have included passwords and cookies and tokens used to authenticate users. A combination of factors made the bug particularly severe. First, the leakage may have been active since September 22, nearly five months before it was discovered, although the greatest period of impact was from February 13 and February 18. Second, some of the highly sensitive data that was leaked was cached by Google and other search engines. The result was that for the entire time the bug was active, hackers had the ability to access the data in real-time by making Web requests to affected websites and to access some of the leaked data later by crafting queries on search engines. "The bug was serious because the leaked memory could contain private information and because it had been cached by search engines," Cloudflare CTO John Graham-Cumming wrote in a blog post published Thursday. "We are disclosing this problem now as we are satisfied that search engine caches have now been cleared of sensitive information. We have also not discovered any evidence of malicious exploits of the bug or other reports of its existence."