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Linux Flaws - or Perhaps Features

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Today in Linux news, Joel Lee identified 5 flaws in Linux that "need fixing." Some of them sound more like features to me. Elsewhere, the Fedora election results are in and Jamie Watson was pleasantly surprised by SparkyLinux Enlightenment. Michael Larabel laments the biggest disappointments of the year and Maximum PC has a review of Alienware's Steam Machine.

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Fedora, Wayland, and Arch Reviews

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Today in Linux news Dedoimedo found a distribution he described as "decent." Elsewhere, Pavlo Rudyi tested Plasma on Wayland and Neil Rickert discussed Kwallet. PCWorld's Jared Newman said Monday, "Ubuntu appears to have fallen far short of the 200 million user goal it set back in 2011" and Jesse Smith reviewed Arch Linux in today's Distrowatch Weekly noting a "fondness growing for Arch."

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Wayland: New Live KDE ISO and Server-side Decorations

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Jonathan Riddell today announced the first Plasma Wayland Live Image so everyone can test drive the new graphics server. Riddell added this is a milestone release because Wayland is able to run a full session including applications. Martin Graesslin joined the conversation by saying server-side window decorations are coming to Wayland early next year.

Riddell wrote that users of the live DVD will "notice some obvious glitches" but all the goodies should be "appreciated by everybody." I didn't have too much luck myself. I did get to the desktop I think, but nothing else materialized. I did see the wallpaper and a pointer. It may be been my dual monitors that threw it off. One screen had the full screen background, but the other monitor had a small section of background and a lot of black. It looked like it was trying to do a clone, but perhaps Wayland is cardist against NVIDIAs or something.

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Also:

  • Server-Side Decorations Implemented For KDE KWin On Wayland

    KDE's Martin Gräßlin has announced a Christmas present to everyone looking forward to KDE on Wayland: support for server-side decorations.

    KDE on Wayland has long been planning to use server-side decorations rather than the client-side decorations done by others on Wayland. Martin has now implemented the KWin/Wayland server-side decorations support to replace the "ugly" and feature-lacking Qt client-side decorations used by default.

  • KDE Releases First Plasma Wayland Live Image
  • First KDE Plasma 5 Wayland Live ISO Image Is Now Available for Download

    A few moments ago, December 18, KDE developer and ex-Kubuntu maintainer Jonathan Riddell had the great pleasure of announcing the immediate availability for download of the first ever Live ISO image with the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment running on top of the next-generation Wayland display server.

Hit Backspace 28 Times or Upgrade Tonight

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Another Linux security vulnerability has been discovered and making the news for a couple of days. Researchers discovered that hitting backspace 28 times allows bypassing of security measures. In other news, Microsoft is increasing pressure on loyal users to upgrade to Windows 10 and Adriaan de Groot said Plasma 5 on FreeBSD when it's stable. Dedoimedo was disappointed in another distro and Bruce Byfield listed nine reasons to use Open Source.

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Manjaro, Makulu, and Microsoft

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Today in Linux news, Jack Wallen predicts 2016 will be the year of Linux desktop, sorta. Blogger Dark Duck reviewed Manjaro Linux 15.09 today and Gary Newell reviewed Makulu Aero Edition. OpenSource.com has 10 handy tools for sysadmins and 10 amazing Open Source projects from 2015. Elsewhere, Bryan Lunduke spoke with community leaders about compromise and LinuxBSDos.com posted a look at elementary OS 0.3.2.

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Person of Year, Podcasts, and Polls

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Today in Linux news, several reviews lead the pack today. Jesse Smith and Das U-Blogger Prashanth reviewed Chakra 2015.11, Swapnil Bhartiya tested newly released Mint 17.3, and a couple of quick openSUSE reports were posted. Elsewhere, Donald Stewart posted an update on Mageia Cauldron and Antonio Rojas said Arch is dropping KDE 4. A couple of interesting polls warrant a mention as well and more in tonight's Linux news recap.

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Linux Gaming Futures, LibreOffice 4.4.7, Cloud v Local

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Today in Linux news, Martin Gräßlin examined the next step in Linux gaming. Italo Vignoli today announced The Document Foundation's LibreOffice 4.4.7 and tech blogger Locutus said it might be time to discuss "code bloat" again. Bruce Byfield took another stab at outlining the choices one really makes when choosing cloud services and the Electron Frontier Foundation launched a new cell phone privacy information site.

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Also: Gecko Brings It, Mageia 6 Delayed, New FSF Laptop

Top 10 Distros of 2015, Microsoft a Great Start

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Today in Linux news, Tecmint posted a look at the top 10 distributions of the year. Jim Zemlin said today that Linux Foundation and Microsoft's partnership is off to a "great start." KDE Plasma 5.5 was released yesterday "with beautiful new artwork" and The Linux Homefront Project gave it the once over. Elsewhere, Clement Lefebvre posted the 17.3 upgrade process and Chris Hoffman reviewed 17.3 for PCWorld.

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BSDs in Linuxland and Best Rolling Distros

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OpenBSD and PC-BSD got the review treatment today at Distrowatch.com and OpenSource.com, proving Linux isn't the only game in town. Several rolling distribution topics arose as well with Dedoimedo fighting Netrunner 2015.11 from destroying a laptop and Jesse Afolabi looking at the best user-friendly distributions based on Arch. Elsewhere, the Mint 17.3 screenshots sprang up faster than a boot-up screen and Curtis Franklin Jr. put together a slideshow on 10 distros perfect for gifts.

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Mint 17.3 Announced, Ubuntu Wins, Spying SMARTs

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Clement Lefebvre announced the releases of Mint 17.3 Cinnamon and MATE Friday evening with lots of improvements and tweaks. Being a long term support release, users can get updates until 2019! Elsewhere, the Free Software Foundation is having a donation drive and the Linux Foundation is urging all Website to get encrypted. Additionally, Robert Cringely cringed at the thought of his appliances spying on him and Dedoimedo said Zorin OS 10 is "looking even better."

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Security Leftovers

10 hot Android smartphones that got price cuts recently

With numerous smartphone getting launched each month, brands always adjust prices to give slightly competitive edge to older smartphone models and also to clear inventories. Here are 10 smartphones that got price cuts recently. Read more

Debian and Ubuntu News

  • Debian Project News - July 29th, 2016
    Welcome to this year's third issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.
  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.87 Released With NVIDIA Pascal Support
  • Snap interfaces for sandboxed applications
    Last week, we took a look at the initial release of the "portal" framework developed for Flatpak, the application-packaging format currently being developed in GNOME. For comparison, we will also explore the corresponding resource-control framework available in the Snap format developed in Ubuntu. The two packaging projects have broadly similar end goals, as many have observed, but they tend to vary quite a bit in the implementation details. Naturally, those differences are of particular importance to the intended audience: application developers. There is some common ground between the projects. Both use some combination of techniques (namespaces, control groups, seccomp filters, etc.) to restrict what a packaged application can do. Moreover, both implement a "deny by default" sandbox, then provide a supplemental means for applications to access certain useful system resources on a restricted or mediated basis. As we will see, there is also some overlap in what interfaces are offered, although the implementations differ. Snap has been available since 2014, so its sandboxing and resource-control implementations have already seen real-world usage. That said, the design of Snap originated in the Ubuntu Touch project aimed at smartphones, so some of its assumptions are undergoing revision as Snap comes to desktop systems. In the Snap framework, the interfaces that are defined to provide access to system resources are called, simply, "interfaces." As we will see, they cover similar territory to the recently unveiled "portals" for Flatpak, but there are some key distinctions. Two classes of Snap interfaces are defined: one for the standard resources expected to be of use to end-user applications, and one designed for use by system utilities. Snap packages using the standard interfaces can be installed with the snap command-line tool (which is the equivalent of apt for .deb packages). Packages using the advanced interfaces require a separate management tool.
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reaches End Of Life Today (July 28)
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Yakkety Yak Gets A Unity HUD-Like Searchable Menu
    MATE HUD, a Unity HUD-like tool that allows searching through an application's menu, was recently uploaded to the official Yakkety Yak repositories, and is available (but not enabled) by default in Ubuntu MATE 16.10.

Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

As employees have become more and more flexible in recent years thanks to the power and performance of mobile devices, the way we work has changed dramatically. We frequently chop and change between smartphones, tablets and laptops for different tasks, which has led to the growth of the hybrid market – devices such as Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Apple’s iPad Pro – that provide the power and functionality of a laptop with the mobility and convenience of a tablet. Read more