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Cloudy Issues and the Perfect Distro

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Today in Linux news, Bruce Byfield hits the cloud nail on the head with his thoughts on the cloud. Are folks sacrificing the independence gained by switching to Linux by trusting cloud vendors? Elsewhere, Bryan Lunduke ponders the perfect Linux distribution and an update on the new Debian Live emerged. Pavlo Rudyi posted a look back at GIMP's 20 years and Samuel Mehrbrodt discussed improving LibreOffice's toolbars.

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GIMP Celebrates 20 Years, Releases 2.8.16

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The top story today is the twentieth anniversary of GIMP, Open Source image manipulation application. To celebrate the project released version 2.8.16 with several new features and a revamped Website. The Linux down under suffered another data breach and Jamie Watson posted a series of step-by-step guides to configure popular desktops. Several reviews blipped the radar as well in today's Linux news.

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Windows at 30, Slack Live Beta Systemd-less

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Today in Linux news, Windows turns 30 and The Verge has a pictorial. In other news, AlienBob said Slackware Live will remain without systemd "for a while" and The Register overheard a GNOME bugzilla report crediting a cat for finding a bug. Stephen O'Grady tracked changing attitudes towards Open Source and the Elementary OS are forking Geary to save it.

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Bodhi 3.1.1 Released, Fedora 21 EOL, Mint 17.3 Betas

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Today the Bodhi project announced an unscheduled bug fix release primarily to address a usability issue as well as bring a few other updates to users. Fedora 21 is fast approaching its end of life and Clement Lefebvre announced some Mint 17.3 betas. Elsewhere, Red Hat released an update to their developer toolkit Software Collections and Bruce Byfield said we should go to "task-based" desktops.

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A day earlier: Fedora 23 Working, Gift Ideas, and Friendly Linux

Linux Challenges, System76 HQ, Linux 4.4-rc1

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Some of the highlights of today's Linux news includes Brian Fagioli's tour of the headquarters of System76, manufacturer of Linux laptops and Matt Hartley discussing the problems with using Linux. Elsewhere, Kevin Fenzi shared some thoughts on recent Rawhide and Jeff Hoogland released some new applications built using the Moksha desktop toolkit.

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KDE & GNOME's Next Big Things, Kubuntu Release Managers

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Jonathan Riddell's departure left Kubuntu without a release manager, until yesterday when Philip Muskovac posted of the replacements, plural. Allan Day today posted about GNOME's "next big thing" and Graham Morrison shared his look "inside the GNOME Foundation." On the KDE side of town, Sebastian Kügler posted some "wayland and libkscreen benchmarks" and Neil Rickert wrote a Plasma 5 review.

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Steam Machines in the News, New User Systems

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Steam Machines became available yesterday and folks are talking, including some from our own community. Elsewhere, Jon Gold ranks distributions on their newbie friendliness and Bruce Byfield discusses more on new user desktops. Ubuntu Community Council election approaches and Wayland is now default in Fedora Rawhide.

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Death of Debian Live, Fedora 24 Schedule, Opposing TPP

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Debian Live has been part of the Debian family for the last 10 years, but yesterday Daniel Baumann announced the end of the project citing internal deception. The Fedora 24 release schedule was highlighted and several reviews brag on Linux capabilities. Finally today, the Free Software Foundation and the Software Freedom Conservancy have posted their opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

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More Linux Attacks of Varying Types

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Last week The Washington Post published an article online stating that Linus Torvalds doesn't take Linux security as seriously as he should and causing a bit of a firestorm. Sam Varghese has the best take-down. In other news, a new trojan targets Linux systems and administers to demand a ransom payment and a new "World without Linux" video was posted.

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Underneath the Red Hat Microsoft Deal, Bodhi is Five

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However, Dr. Roy Schestowitz isn't celebrating. In fact, he said the deal could very well put many distributions out of business (so to speak) and Red Hat users at risk. He said the deal involves patent agreements and data collection. It's all about money according to Schestowitz who said, "At Red Hat money now matters more than freedom and ethics." For Microsoft it's about double and triple taxing users in addition to collecting and selling their data. Red Hat isn't interested in defending GNU/Linux against patent trolls and instead pays out to settle cases and now signs a patent deal according to Schestowitz and his quoted and linked sources. Microsoft has and is continuing to pursue lawsuits against Open Source entities. Nasdaq.com said on the subject Microsoft is known for "aggressively seeking royalties from its software patents" then quoted Red Hat's Paul Cormier saying, "We both know we have very different positions on software patents. We weren't expecting each other to compromise."We weren't expecting each other to compromise." So, at least one other site covered the patent situation, even if not in depth. Red Hat stock closed at $82.75 after the announcement Wednesday and finshed up today, Thursday, at 81.57.

Sam Varghese today asked, "With two companies — Microsoft and Red Hat — from opposite ends of the software spectrum linking arms in a deal overnight, the big question that remains is: what happens to the SUSE-Microsoft deal?" He suggests SUSE might not get the same level of assistance it once did now. But then again, he also speculated that the deal is "unlikely to earn any criticism from the open source community" as it SUSE did. I guess he hasn't read Schestowitz lately.

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More in Tux Machines

Feral Interactive Ports Life Is Strange to Linux and Mac, Episode 1 Is Now Free

Feral Interactive has recently announced that they have managed to successfully port the popular, award-winning Life Is Strange game to GNU/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems. Read more

Introduction to Modularity

Modularity is an exciting, new initiative aimed at resolving the issue of diverging (and occasionally conflicting) lifecycles of different “components” within Fedora. A great example of a diverging and conflicting lifecycle is the Ruby on Rails (RoR) lifecycle, whereby Fedora stipulates that itself can only have one version of RoR at any point in time – but that doesn’t mean Fedora’s version of RoR won’t conflict with another version of RoR used in an application. Therefore, we want to avoid having “components”, like RoR, conflict with other existing components within Fedora. Read more

Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

Now that I’ve had about a week to play around in Mint 18, I find a lot to like and have no major complaints. While Cinnamon probably isn’t destined to become my desktop of choice, I don’t dislike it and find it, hands down, the best of the GNOME based desktops I’ve tried so far. Anybody looking for a powerful, all purpose distro that’s designed to work smoothly and which can be mastered with ease would be hard pressed to find anything better. Read more

The subtle art of the Desktop

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself. My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system. Read more