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No Ubuntu Back Doors, Windows and Mac Migrations

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Today in Linux news Microsoft's market share has dipped below 90% and Mac is disappearing from Linux conventions. Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth said in an interview today that security and encryption are a commitment of Ubuntu's. Jesse Smith reviewed the latest version of Ubuntu and OMG!Ubuntu! shared some glimpses of Ubuntu in the wild. Bryan Lunduke listed 12 "Linux geeks" all users should follow on social media and Sandra Gittlen highlighted six colleges that "immerse students in Open Source."

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Devuan Beta, Stumbling Tumbleweed, Ubuntu Too

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Today in Linux news Debian-fork Devuan is forging ahead with its plans to create a distribution offering init freedom by releasing a beta for testers. Douglas DeMaio posted today that openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have halted due to glibc upgrade rebuilds. Dedoimedo reviewed the BQ Aquaris M10 and liliputing.com posted of another Ubuntu laptop for sale. And finally, the Hectic Geek reviewed Ubuntu 16.04 and Neil Rickert reviewed Kubuntu 16.04.

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Also: Devuan releases beta

Devuan Jessie - beta release announcement

Fedora 24 Delayed, Linus the Tops, New openSUSE Team

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Fedora Program Manager Jan Kuřík today announced a delay in Fedora 24, both the upcoming Beta and Final. Elsewhere openSUSE announced a new community release team, a group of volunteers to help with the release tasks. Linus Torvalds and Richard Stallman both appeared on a "top 10 programmers of all time" list and a Windows 10 upgrade screen has gone viral.

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Firefox 46, Vivaldi 1.1, Homeless Thunderbird

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Mozilla was in the news today first for releasing Firefox 46 with GTK+ 3 integration. They're also making headlines for trying to find a new home for Thunderbird, their browser-based email client. In competing news, the Vivaldi project announced version 1.1 of their new browser already, not even a month since its initial release. Elsewhere, Bruce Byfield discusses the Debian installer and Jack Germain said "Bodhi Linux is elegant and lightweight."

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Also: Update to Firefox Released Today

Should MS Buy Canonical, No Year of Linux Desktop

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With Microsoft and Canonical's new chummy relationship still on the minds of many, Janakiram MSV today said "Microsoft's Open Source strategy is incompletely" without them. He said with Microsoft trying to change their image away from being Windows-only, it only makes sense to buy Canonical. Ubuntu has millions of users and "an army of developers and system administrators." Besides people, Canonical comes with LXD, Snappy Ubuntu Core, and Juju - all things that could make Microsoft more competitive in the cloud and IoT. To Janakiram, there are no downsides for Microsoft.

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Snap Not Contained, Shuttleworth Says Don't Talk Back

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Ubuntu continued to dominate the headlines today with some reporting the new version being actually available and all the usual accompanying posts. One of the more interesting Ubuntu articles of the day came from Matthew Garrett who said that Snap applications could expose your private data. In other Ubuntu news, Mark Shuttleworth announced the new codename for the next release already. Elsewhere, Gentoo was hacked onto a car computer and Microsoft is hiring Linux developers.

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Also: Developer Claims That Canonical's Snap Format Isn't Secure in Ubuntu with X11 - Updated

Ubuntu 16.04 Imminent, New Slack Live Beta, Fedora 24/25 Schedules

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Canonical today announced the release of Ubuntu 16.04, although it isn't actually on mirrors yet. Eric Hameleers announced the next test release of Slackware Live whose final will be based on upcoming Slackware 14.2 and Fedora 24 may end up slipping another week causing ripple effects through version 26. Bruce Byfield today discussed the second goal of Linux and Jonathan Riddell announced a user edition of KDE neon.

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rm -rf Hoax, Well-oiled LXLE, New Debian Project Leader

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It turns out that Marco Marsala's deletion of his entire web hosting data, reported Friday, was a viral marketing campaign. Debian Project Leader elections are over and a winner emerged victorious. Several reviews caught my eye today as did Jessie Smith's look at Redox, a Unix-like operating system whose underlying philosophy is "Everything is a URL."

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rm -rf Whoops, Slackware 14.2 RC2, Shuttleworth Interview

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Mark Shuttleworth said in an interview published today that Linux would be difficult to use everyday if not for Ubuntu. Elsewhere, Patrick Volkerding announced Slackware 14.2 RC2 and one sysadmin had a real bad day after accidentally running rm -rf. Reiserfs creator and convicted murderer Hans Reiser is featured in a new motion picture that's getting mixed reviews and Neil Rickert shared his thoughts on btrfs.

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Kubuntu's Cautionary Tale, Requiem for Open Standards

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Andy Updegrove wrote yesterday, "The top IT companies are increasingly opting to use open source software to solve problems that they used to address with open standards." Elsewhere, Larry the BSD Guy said UbuntuBSD should consider what happened to Kubuntu when considering becoming an official Ubuntu flavor and Jesse Afolabi was "blown away" by Deepin OS 15. Jonathan Riddell announced a new rebasing of KDE Neon and Bruce Byfield looks at the Free Software Foundation's High Priority Projects.

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Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Phone - With Android

I ever so slightly regret the "upgrade" to Android. With a version less than the tablet, the UI changes are extremely noticeable, and the transition isn't as smooth. The device lags, and it just doesn't have enough processing power to give the necessary feel of goodness and elegance. On the other hand, you get tons of native applications that you can actually use, as opposed to the Ubuntu Touch idea. Shame really. For 'tis a compromise. If you ask me, I wholeheartedly embrace the M10 tablet upgrade, but on the phone, you might as well keep Ubuntu unless you need the device for serious use. If it's just an opportunistic call/SMS thing for when abroad and such, or to loan to friends, the original combo is adequate. If you need apps, then Android is the way to go, but do not except any miracles. It won't be speedy, and it won't be too pretty. All in all, an okay player. It is silly attaching sentiments to software or hardware, but I do guess I will fondly remember the Ubuntu phone attempt as a noble idea to make something great and fun. I could have kept the device in its original state, perhaps, but in the end, it would have ended in a pile of ancient stuff you keep around for a decade until you decide you need to throw it away to leave room for fresh memories and less ancient stuff. Having a flawless Android experience would have helped soften the edge, but as it is, it remains the bittersweet attempt at what could have been a revolution. The end. Read more Also: Ubuntu Desktop weekly update – February 23, 2018

​Docker and Red Hat News

  • ​Docker has a business plan headache
    We love containers. And, for most of us, containers means Docker. As RightScale observed in its RightScale 2018 State of the Cloud report, Docker's adoption by the industry has increased to 49 percent from 35 percent in 2017.
  • Mycroft Widget, Atos and Red Hat's New Cloud Container Solution, npm Bug and More
    Atos and Red Hat announced this morning "a new fully-managed cloud container solution - Atos Managed OpenShift (AMOS) - built on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform". The press release adds, "Because AMOS is built on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a container-centric hybrid cloud solution, it can deliver the flexibility customers seek from cloud-native and container-based applications."
  • Red Hat Decision Manager 7 Boosts BPM with Low-Code Approach
    Red Hat is perhaps best known for its Enterprise Linux platform, but it has been a player in the Business Process Management (BPM) suite for over a decade too. On Feb. 21, Red Hat Decision Manager 7 was officially announced as the successor to the company's JBoss Business Rules Management System (BRMS) product. Red Hat first released BRMS back in May 2009 which itself was an evolution of the JBoss Rules Engine.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) – Active Stock Evaluation

FATHOM releases Crystallon

  • FATHOM releases Crystallon, an open-source software for lattice-based design
    Lattice structures are integral to 3D printed designs, and Aaron Porterfield, an industrial designer at additive manufacturing service bureau FATHOM, has developed Crystallon, an open source project for shaping them into structures.
  • FATHOM Introduces Open Source Software Project for Generating 3D Lattice Structures
    California-based FATHOM, which expanded its on-site managed services and announced important partnerships with Stratasys and Desktop Metal last year, is introducing a fascinating new open source project called Crystallon, which uses Rhino and Grasshopper3D to create lattice structures. FATHOM industrial designer Aaron Porterfield, also an Instructables member, developed the project as an alternative to designing lattices with commercially available software. He joined the company’s design and engineering team three years ago, and is often a featured speaker for its Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) Training Program – and as the project developer, who better to explain the Crystallon project?

Kernel and Graphics: Machine Learning, Mesa, Wayland/Mir, AMDGPU

  • AI-Powered / Machine Learning Linux Performance Tuning Is Now A Thing
    A year and a half ago I wrote about a start-up working on dynamically-tuned, self-optimizing Linux servers. That company is now known as Concertio and they just launched their "AI powered" toolkit for IT administrators and performance engineers to optimize their server performance. Concertio Optimizer Studio is their product making use of machine learning that aims to optimize Linux systems with Intel CPUs for peak performance by scoping out the impact of hundreds of different tunables for trying to deliver an optimal configuration package for that workload on that hardware.
  • Pengutronix Gets Open-Source 3D Working On MX8M/GC7000 Hardware
    We've known that Pengutronix developers had been working on i.MX8M / GC7000 graphics support within their Etnaviv open-source driver stack from initial patches posted in January. Those patches back at the start of the year were for the DRM kernel driver, but it turns out they have already got basic 3D acceleration working.
  • SDL Now Disables Mir By Default In Favor Of Wayland Compatibility
    With Mir focusing on Wayland compatibility now, toolkits and other software making direct use of Mir's APIs can begin making use of any existing Wayland back-end instead. GTK4 drops the Mir back-end since the same can be achieved with the Wayland compatibility and now SDL is now making a similar move.
  • Mesa 18.1 Receives OpenGL 3.1 With ARB_compatibility For Gallium3D Drivers
    Going back to last October, Marek of AMD's open-source driver team has been working on ARB_compatibility support for Mesa with a focus on RadeonSI/Gallium3D. Today that work was finally merged. The ARB_compatibility support allows use of deprecated/removed features of OpenGL by newer versions of the specification. ARB_compatibility is particularly useful for OpenGL workstation users where there are many applications notorious for relying upon compatibility contexts / deprecated GL functionality. But ARB_compatibility is also used by a handful of Linux games too.
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.17 Exposes WattMan Features, GPU Voltage/Power Via Hwmon
    AMD's Alex Deucher today sent in the first pull request to DRM-Next of AMDGPU (and Radeon) DRM driver feature material that will in turn be merged with the Linux 4.17 kernel down the road. There's some fun features for AMDGPU users coming with this next kernel! First up, Linux is finally getting some WattMan-like functionality after it's been available via the Windows Radeon Software driver since 2016. WattMan allows for more fine-tuning of GPU clocks, voltages, and more for trying to maximize the power efficiency. See the aforelinked article for details but currently without any GUI panel for tweaking all of the driver tunables, this WattMan-like support needs to be toggled from the command-line.