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Red Hat Expansion Rumors and Easier Fedora Nightlies

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Red Hat is looking to expand their business into the Boston, Massachusetts and a version of the Red Hat logo may point where. Adam Williamson recently set up a directory where one can "easily find Fedora nightly images" and Benjamin Kerensa spoke with Vivaldi founder Jon von Tetzchner. In other news, Sasha Levin announced a new linux-stable security tree project and the Linux Foundation said the Internet is crumbling.

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New Malware Headlines, Fedora Stickers, New RMS Article

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A new Linux botnet named BillGates is making headlines today. The Russian-based Asian designed malware seems to be focusing on gaming sites. Elsewhere, Richard Stallman posted a new article today explaining the problem when free software requires non-free to function and Matt Hartley explained the difference between GNOME, Unity, and MATE. Then, for some fun, the new Plasma 5.7 wallpaper was revealed, a new Linux poll beckons, and Fedora announced a partnership with UnixStickers.com.

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LibreOffice 5.1.2, Ubuntu Numbers, OS is Dead

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The Document Foundation today announced the release of LibreOffice 5.1.2, the second update in the 5.1 Fresh branch. Nearly 90 bugs were squashed this cycle dealing heavily with rendering and placement issues. In other news, Red Hat touts a new client and Canonical is still trying to convince folks of their hundreds of millions of users. Matt Asay said today that the OS is dead thanks to the cloud and that "developers are becoming babies."

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New Vivaldi Browser, Red Hat Slapped, More Winbuntu

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One of the top stories today was the release of Vivaldi 1.0. Vivaldi is a new browser project founded by John von Tetzchner who co-founded Opera. In other news, Red Hat lost an important new client today but Jim Whitehurst is still confident of reaching $5 billion in revenue in five years. "PC-BSD 10.3 is looking great" and that Windows 10 update with Ubashu is now available.

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Dealing With Microsoft, KDE's New Vision, XScreenSaver Battle

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The fallout from last week's Canonical-Microsoft announcement continues to rain. First reactions ranged from enthusiastic to shocked and this week distrust is a common theme. Elsewhere, the KDE project presented its new and improved philosophy and is working on the mission statement. Apparently XScreenSaver is causing a bit of a kerfuffle in Debianland and Bruce Byfield ranked desktops from most customizable to "little more than launchers."

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Debian 7 & 8 Updated, New SUSE CTO, Different Distros

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The Debian project announced updates to "jessie" and "wheezy" last weekend bringing security and bug fixes only. In other news, SUSE announced a new executive position and the gentlemen who filled it. Elsewhere, Christine Hall discussed five distributions that "break the mold" and Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols reported on Linus Torvalds' talk at the 2016 Embedded Linux Conference.

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Fair Source, April Fools', Winbuntu review

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Today in Linux news, Matt Asay explained why Fair Source isn't Open Source and Blogger Locutus reviewed the new Winbuntu monster. Microsoft lured Oracle's Linux guy to Redmond and LinuxGizmos changed name and focus to Hackerboards.com. Of course, April 1 wouldn't be the same without some April Fools' jokes.

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Red Hat NSA, SUSE Phone, Fedora Looking Great

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Sam Varghese today again asked about Red Hat and its dealing with the NSA saying, "Red Hat is receiving a goodly sum to assist the NSA in activities that infringe on people's privacy." Red Hat today offered its enterprise operating system free of cost to developers and Phoronix.com said Fedora 24 is "looking great." Paul Thurrott posted screenshots of Ubuntu Bash on Windows 10 and Bryan Lunduke today asked, "Will openSUSE develop the SUSE Phone?"

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Bodhi 3.2.0, SCOmbie Lives, Winbuntu

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Jeff Hoogland today announced the release of Bodhi Linux 3.2.0 featuring a new version of his Moksha desktop. The news of Ubuntu's Bash on the next Windows 10 update has been filling the headlines for two days and today blogger Locutus called it "The Devil's Spawn." OpenOffice extensions are terribly outdated and SCO is back from the dead to file another appeal.

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Linux is 25, Fedora 24 Alpha, Classy Apricity

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It's been 25 years since Linus Torvalds began Linux and IEEE Spectrum ran two articles today on him and his kernel. Elsewhere, Fedora 24 Alpha was released as planned and Jack Germain reviewed Apricity OS saying it's class and clean. The Register's Scott Gilbertson reviewed the Ubuntu 16.04 beta and March 30 is Document Freedom Day.

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Today in Techrights

OSS and Sharing/Standards Leftovers

  • Linux Announces New Open Network Automation Platform Project
    The Linux Foundation has announced the creation of the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project with the merger of Open Orchestrator Project (OPEN-O) and open source ECOMP. This new platform will help in designing, automating, orchestrating, and managing network services and virtual functions by creating a comprehensive and a harmonized framework that allows virtual network functions to be automated by using real-time, policy-driven software.
  • Open-Source Networking Is Coming of Age
    Service providers of all sizes and types should take note of some changes occurring across the open-source community—changes that promise to accelerate the adoption of software-defined networks (SDN). The first is a decision by AT&T to open source the ECOMP management and orchestration (MANO) framework it developed via the Linux Foundation. Through a variety of working groups, the foundation has been accelerating the development of core network function virtualization (NFV) software and associated SDN technologies. But a big piece missing from that equation has been the management plane.
  • CAVO Continues to Advance Open Source for Democracy [Ed: Remember what Microsoft did there]
    OSI Affiliate Member, the California Association of Voting Officials (CAVO), has shared some exciting news regarding their advocacy work in San Francisco: according to the San Francisco Examiner, the city of San Francisco is pushing forward with plans to develop their open source election system. In addition, the paper is reporting that the San Francisco Elections Commission voted unanimously on Feb 17th to request $4 million to fund the initial stages of the open source voting system. For many years board members of CAVO have been urging San Francisco to expedite, "the creation and deployment of a GPL v3 open source / paper ballot printing system that would set the standard for voting systems nationally." According to CAVO, currently only New Hampshire has deployed a voting system using open source software, Prime III.
  • Mozilla Acquires Pocket, Will Open Source Pocket Code
    Chances are you've heard the new: Mozilla has acquired Pocket, the go-to 'read it later' service, and says it plans to open-source Pocket code in due course.
  • The Speed Of LLVM's LLD Linker Continues Looking Good
    LLVM's LLD linker still isn't too widely used yet on Linux systems, but the performance of this linker alternative to GNU Gold and GNU ld are quite compelling. We've written many times before about the much progress and better performance of "the LLVM linker" while some new numbers were committed to the LLD documentation.
  • Welcome to Code.mil - an experiment in open source at the Department of Defense!
  • DoD Announces the Launch of “Code.mil,” an Experiment in Open Source
    The Department of Defense (DoD) announced the launch of Code.mil, an open source initiative that allows software developers around the world to collaborate on unclassified code written by federal employees in support of DoD projects.
  • An Introduction to Open Data Kit

Leftovers: Software

  • Linux Command Line Browser To Surf Internet
    Links is an open source text and graphical web browser with a pull-down menu system. It renders complex pages, has partial HTML 4.0 support (including tables and frames and support for multiple characters sets such as UTF-8), supports color and monochrome terminals and allows horizontal scrolling. It’s very useful for low resources computers because day by day the web pages are bigger and heavier. If your computer doesn’t have a suitable performance you’ll have some mistakes while you’re surfing. So, Links is much faster than any common web browser (with GUI) because it doesn’t load all the content of a website, for example, videos, flash, etc.
  • Stacer – The Linux System Optimizer You’ve Been Waiting For
    System optimizer apps are quite the thing on platforms such as Windows and Android. Their usefulness, however, is debatable considering how notorious they are when it comes to using system resources. On the Linux platform, however, we can almost always find the applications, a developer puts their time in developing to be mostly useful. Stacer is one such app created to better optimized your Linux PC in the sense that it packs quite the list of features you’d normally expect from an optimizer and more to give your system a refresh whenever you feel the need.
  • Ulauncher – A Lightweight Application Launcher for Linux
    Each Desktop environment has the own launcher and doing their job nicely but it take a while to launch the application whenever we are searching. Ulauncher is a lightweight application launcher that loads instant search results, usese low resources, and remembers your previous choices and automatically selects the best option for you. It’s written in Python and uses GTK as a GUI toolkit. When you are typing wrong application name, after few words or spelling, it will figure out what you meant. Use Ulauncher to open your files and directories faster with fuzzy search. Type ~ or / to start browsing. Press Alt+Enter to access the alt menu.

Linux Kernel and Graphics