Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

-s

LibreOffice 5.1.1 Fulfills 14 Year Request

Filed under
-s

Italo Vignoli today announced the release of LibreOffice 5.1.1, the first update to 5.1 released last month. Today's release brings 83 bug fixes and one new feature that was originally requested in 2002. In other news, a new router was awarded the Free Software Foundation Respects Your Freedom certification and Dr. Roy Schestowitz is unhappy with the coverage of the Microsoft Linux love feasting this week. Several Solus and a couple of Korora reviews have popped up in recent days as well.

Read more

Ubuntu Choice, Linux Movies, LibreOffice Documentation

Filed under
-s

The big story today was the decision by Ubuntu developers to discontinue providing AMD proprietary graphic drivers. Olivier Hallot has been appointed to lead the new LibreOffice documentation project and Jun Auza has a round-up of Hollywood movies that use Linux in some way. Red Hat Enterprise Linux is heading for Qualcomm ARM server and Linux is back on PlayStations.

Read more

Korora Love, Why Wayland, Microsoft Monopoly

Filed under
-s

Korora 23 was released February 7 and today Jack Germain said you'll love it. Matthias Clasen today blogged that Wayland would still not be the default in Fedora 24 and Ubuntu convergence is starting to impress. Tim Sweeney, founder Epic Games and creator Gears of War, said Microsoft is (shockingly) trying to create a monopoly and a new startup is creating something on which users can run their choice of Windows or Ubuntu.

Read more

Debian 9 Delay, Linux PTSD, and Shells

Filed under
-s

The top story of this slightly slow new day was the announcement from Jonathan Wiltshire, Debian release assistant, stating Debian 9 would be delayed two months. Steven Ovadia dug up an interesting blog post from someone claiming to suffer from Linux Desktop PTSD and KDE announced a new community outreach program. Jason Baker posted a round-up and poll of the top five Linux shells and why do distros look so darn insecure?

Read more

Also: Debian 9 "Stretch" Freeze Delayed to Integrate Linux Kernel 4.10

Mint Recovery, Tumbleweed Updates, Charlie Brown Ubuntu

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news Clement Lefebvre today said that things are back up and running over in Mintland with more security measures in place. Douglas DeMaio posted of the latest Tumbleweeds news including new KDE app store and Jack Wallen asked, "Why's everybody all pickin' on Ubuntu?" The Free Software Foundation said to 'read the fine manual' in answer to the ZFS GPL question and another security vulnerability involving SSLv2 was announced.

Read more

Gentoo Choice, Awful Fedora 24, Debian Firefox

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news the Ubuntu ZFS controversy isn't quite settled after all. Fedora's Adam Williamson today blogged, " Lots of stuff is busted. We are aware of this, and fixing it. Hold onto your hats." Richard Freeman reminded folks the systemd disagreements aren't over either and Debian has finally stopped renaming Firefox to Iceweasel. Dedoimedo said today that Mepis derivative MX-15 is on the "highway to rad" and Christine Hall signed SCO's death warrant.

Read more

ReactOS, openSUSE Reports, Miller on Fedora

Filed under
-s

With Tumbleweed back up and running, Dominique Leuenberger is back with another weekly update while Neil Rickert test drove new Argon and Krypton. Tecmint.com said ReacOS is the "perfect Windows alternative" and LinuxInsider.com said RebeccaBlackOS is a "class act." Fedora's Matthew Miller spoke to PCWorld's Chris Hoffman about what's brewing at the blue hat and Riccardo Padovani video interviewed Mark Shuttleworth in tonight's Linux news.

Read more

Tumbleweed Rolling, Tails Anonymity, Bodhi Forum Hiccup

Filed under
-s

Today in Linux news openSUSE's Tumbleweed is back up and rolling thanks to two new Intels. The Bodhi project suffered a glitch in their forums today causing downtime but "little to no lost content." Bryan Lunduke interviewed nameless faceless members of the Tails team and SFC posted that including ZFS in Ubuntu does violate the GPL. John P. Mello Jr. has "the downside of Linux popularity" and Bruce Byfield looks back at the career of GNOME founder Miguel de Icaza.

Read more

Mint Under Fire, Ubuntu Mixed Reviews

Filed under
-s

Since Sunday's Mint reveal, a certain segment of users is upset over the lack of security measures that lead to the February 20 attack. Bryan Lunduke is impressed with a video of Ubuntu on a tablet, but actual users less so. A KDE NEON unstable repository is open and Jeff Law introduced folks to the new features in GCC 6. And finally,in light of the Mint mishap, Kevin Fenzi has offered up a "Fedora distribution download primer."

Read more

Oh No, Linux Mint Hacked, ISO's Compromised

Filed under
-s

The Linux Mint Website, forums, and images were hacked this weekend. Clement Lefebvre announced the breach to the public Sunday morning saying, "I’m sorry I have to come with bad news. We were exposed to an intrusion today." The hacker spoke with ZDNet today about his motivations and the extent of the damage, which includes uploading a version of Mint 17.3 Cinnamon with backdoors and selling forum user data on the black market.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Browsers: Mozilla Firefox and Bromite

  • Firefox 60 Product Integrity Requests Report
    Late last year I was putting out weekly reports on the number of requests Mozilla’s Product Integrity group was receiving and how well we were tracking toward our self-imposed service-level agreement (respond to 90% within 48 hours). The initial system we set up was only ever intended to be minimally viable and has not scaled well, although that’s probably to be expected. There’s been quite a lot of growing pains so I’ve been tasked with taking it to the next level.
  • Tab Warming: How Firefox Will Improve Web Browsing Experience? How To Get It Now?
    Mozilla developer Mike Conley described the details about Tab Warming in a post on his personal blog. It will improve tab switching by pre-loading the contents of a tab before it gets displayed in front of the users.
  • Bromite Is the New NoChromo — Open Source Chrome Port with Ad Blocking
    A while back, we told you about NoChromo, a no-root ad-blocking browser based on Google Chrome's open source code base, Chromium. That browser was wildly successful, as it offered an identical interface to regular Chrome, but without any ads. Sadly, the developer abandoned NoChromo, but a new ad-blocking Chromium port called Bromite has been released to fill its void.

GNOME: GNOME Shell, Bug Tracking, GXml

  • How to Install GNOME Shell Extensions GUI / CLI
    GNOME Shell extensions are small and lightweight pieces of codes that enhance GNOME desktop’s functionality and improves the user experience. They are the equivalent of add-ons in your browser. For instance, you can have add-ons that download videos like IDM downloader or block annoying ads such as Adblocker. Similarly, GNOME extensions perform certain tasks e.g. Display weather and geolocation. One of the tools used to install and customize GNOME Shell extensions is the GNOME tweak tool. It comes pre-installed in the latest Linux distributions. This article we cover how to install GNOME Shell extensions from GUI and from the command line on various Linux distros.
  • Musings on bug trackers
    I love bugzilla, I really do. I’ve used it nearly my entire career in free software. I know it well, I like the command line tool integration. But I’ve never had a day in bugzilla where I managed to resolve/triage/close nearly 100 issues. I managed to do that today with our gitlab instance and I didn’t even mean to.
  • ABI stability for GXml
    I’m taking a deep travel across Vala code; trying to figure out how things work. With my resent work on abstract methods for compact classes, may I have an idea on how to provide ABI stability to GXml. GXml have lot of interfaces for DOM4, implemented in classes, like Gom* series. But they are a lot, so go for each and add annotations, like Gee did, to improve ABI, is a hard work.

More on Barcelona Moving to Free Software

  • Barcelona Aims To Oust Microsoft In Open Source Drive
    The city of Barcelona has embarked on an ambitious open source effort aimed at reducing its dependence on large proprietary software vendors such as Microsoft, including the replacement of both applications and operating systems.
  • Barcelona to ditch Microsoft software for open source software
    Barcelona, one of the most popular cities in the Europe is now switching to open-source software by replacing Microsoft Windows, Office and Exchange with Linux, Libre Office and Open Xchange respectively. The city council is already piloting the use of Ubuntu Linux desktops along with Mozilla Firefox as the default browser. With this move, Barcelona city is planning to save money over the years by reducing software/service licensing fees. They are also planning to hire new developers to write open-source software. The open-source product will also be made available to other Spanish municipalities and public bodies further afield allowing them the opportunity to save money on software licences.
  • Barcelona to ditch Microsoft in favour of open source Linux software
    Catalan capital Barcelona is planning to ditch proprietary software products from Microsoft in favour of free, open source alternatives such as Open-Xchange email. That’s according to a report by Spain's national paper El Pais, which reports that Barcelona plans to invest 70% of its annual software budget in open source this year.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open Source turns 20
    While open source software is ubiquitous, recognized across industries as a fundamental infrastructure component as well as a critical factor for driving innovation, the "open source" label was coined only 20 years ago. The concept of open source software - as opposed to free software or freeware - is credited to Netscape which, in January 1998, announced plans to release the source code of its proprietary browser, Navigator, under a license that would freely permit modification and redistribution. This code is today the basis for Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird. The Open Source Initiative (OSI) regards that event as the point at which "software freedom extended its reach beyond the enthusiast community and began its ascent into the mainstream".
  • Coreboot 4.7 Released With 47 More Motherboards Supported, AMD Stoney Ridge
    Coreboot 4.7 is now available as the latest release of this free and open-source BIOS/UEFI replacement. Coreboot 4.7 is the latest tagged release for this project developed via Git. This release has initial support for AMD Stoney Ridge platforms, Intel ICH10 Southbridge support, Intel Denverton/Denverton-NS platform support, and initial work on supporting next-gen Intel Cannonlake platforms.
  • Thank you CUSEC!
    Last week, I spoke at CUSEC (Canadian Undergraduate Software Engineering Conference) in Montreal.   I really enjoy speaking with students and learning what they are working on.  They are the future of our industry!  I was so impressed by the level of organization and the kindness and thoughtfulness of the CUSEC organizing committee who were all students from various universities across Canada. I hope that you all are enjoying some much needed rest after your tremendous work in the months approaching the conference and last week.
  • Percona Announces Sneak Peek of Conference Breakout Sessions for Seventh Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference
  • The Universal Donor
    A few people reacted negatively to my article on why Public Domain software is broadly unsuitable for inclusion in a community open source project. Most argued that because public domain gave them the rights they need where they live (mostly the USA), I should not say it was wrong to use it. That demonstrates either parochialism or a misunderstanding of what public domain really means. It should not be used for the same reason code known to be subject to software patents should not be used — namely that only code that, to the best efforts possible, can be used by anyone, anywhere without the need to ask permission (e.g. by buying a patent license) or check it it’s needed (e.g. is that PD code PD here?) can be used in an open source project. Public domain fails the test for multiple reasons: global differences in copyright term, copyright as an unalienable moral rather than as a property right, and more. Yes, public domain may give you the rights you need. But in an open source project, it’s not enough for you to determine you personally have the rights you need. In order to function, every user and contributor of the project needs prior confidence they can use, improve and share the code, regardless of their location or the use to which they put it. That confidence also has to extend to their colleagues, customers and community as well.