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LibreOffice 5.1.1 Fulfills 14 Year Request

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Italo Vignoli today announced the release of LibreOffice 5.1.1, the first update to 5.1 released last month. Today's release brings 83 bug fixes and one new feature that was originally requested in 2002. In other news, a new router was awarded the Free Software Foundation Respects Your Freedom certification and Dr. Roy Schestowitz is unhappy with the coverage of the Microsoft Linux love feasting this week. Several Solus and a couple of Korora reviews have popped up in recent days as well.

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Ubuntu Choice, Linux Movies, LibreOffice Documentation

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The big story today was the decision by Ubuntu developers to discontinue providing AMD proprietary graphic drivers. Olivier Hallot has been appointed to lead the new LibreOffice documentation project and Jun Auza has a round-up of Hollywood movies that use Linux in some way. Red Hat Enterprise Linux is heading for Qualcomm ARM server and Linux is back on PlayStations.

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Korora Love, Why Wayland, Microsoft Monopoly

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Korora 23 was released February 7 and today Jack Germain said you'll love it. Matthias Clasen today blogged that Wayland would still not be the default in Fedora 24 and Ubuntu convergence is starting to impress. Tim Sweeney, founder Epic Games and creator Gears of War, said Microsoft is (shockingly) trying to create a monopoly and a new startup is creating something on which users can run their choice of Windows or Ubuntu.

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Debian 9 Delay, Linux PTSD, and Shells

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The top story of this slightly slow new day was the announcement from Jonathan Wiltshire, Debian release assistant, stating Debian 9 would be delayed two months. Steven Ovadia dug up an interesting blog post from someone claiming to suffer from Linux Desktop PTSD and KDE announced a new community outreach program. Jason Baker posted a round-up and poll of the top five Linux shells and why do distros look so darn insecure?

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Also: Debian 9 "Stretch" Freeze Delayed to Integrate Linux Kernel 4.10

Mint Recovery, Tumbleweed Updates, Charlie Brown Ubuntu

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Today in Linux news Clement Lefebvre today said that things are back up and running over in Mintland with more security measures in place. Douglas DeMaio posted of the latest Tumbleweeds news including new KDE app store and Jack Wallen asked, "Why's everybody all pickin' on Ubuntu?" The Free Software Foundation said to 'read the fine manual' in answer to the ZFS GPL question and another security vulnerability involving SSLv2 was announced.

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Gentoo Choice, Awful Fedora 24, Debian Firefox

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Today in Linux news the Ubuntu ZFS controversy isn't quite settled after all. Fedora's Adam Williamson today blogged, " Lots of stuff is busted. We are aware of this, and fixing it. Hold onto your hats." Richard Freeman reminded folks the systemd disagreements aren't over either and Debian has finally stopped renaming Firefox to Iceweasel. Dedoimedo said today that Mepis derivative MX-15 is on the "highway to rad" and Christine Hall signed SCO's death warrant.

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ReactOS, openSUSE Reports, Miller on Fedora

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With Tumbleweed back up and running, Dominique Leuenberger is back with another weekly update while Neil Rickert test drove new Argon and Krypton. Tecmint.com said ReacOS is the "perfect Windows alternative" and LinuxInsider.com said RebeccaBlackOS is a "class act." Fedora's Matthew Miller spoke to PCWorld's Chris Hoffman about what's brewing at the blue hat and Riccardo Padovani video interviewed Mark Shuttleworth in tonight's Linux news.

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Tumbleweed Rolling, Tails Anonymity, Bodhi Forum Hiccup

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Today in Linux news openSUSE's Tumbleweed is back up and rolling thanks to two new Intels. The Bodhi project suffered a glitch in their forums today causing downtime but "little to no lost content." Bryan Lunduke interviewed nameless faceless members of the Tails team and SFC posted that including ZFS in Ubuntu does violate the GPL. John P. Mello Jr. has "the downside of Linux popularity" and Bruce Byfield looks back at the career of GNOME founder Miguel de Icaza.

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Mint Under Fire, Ubuntu Mixed Reviews

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Since Sunday's Mint reveal, a certain segment of users is upset over the lack of security measures that lead to the February 20 attack. Bryan Lunduke is impressed with a video of Ubuntu on a tablet, but actual users less so. A KDE NEON unstable repository is open and Jeff Law introduced folks to the new features in GCC 6. And finally,in light of the Mint mishap, Kevin Fenzi has offered up a "Fedora distribution download primer."

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Oh No, Linux Mint Hacked, ISO's Compromised

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The Linux Mint Website, forums, and images were hacked this weekend. Clement Lefebvre announced the breach to the public Sunday morning saying, "I’m sorry I have to come with bad news. We were exposed to an intrusion today." The hacker spoke with ZDNet today about his motivations and the extent of the damage, which includes uploading a version of Mint 17.3 Cinnamon with backdoors and selling forum user data on the black market.

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Security: Google and Morgan Marquis-Boire

  • Google: 25 per cent of black market passwords can access accounts

    The researchers used Google's proprietary data to see whether or not stolen passwords could be used to gain access to user accounts, and found that an estimated 25 per cent of the stolen credentials can successfully be used by cyber crooks to gain access to functioning Google accounts.

  • Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials

    Drawing upon Google as a case study, we find 7--25\% of exposed passwords match a victim's Google account.

  • Infosec star accused of sexual assault booted from professional affiliations
    A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault. On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire's home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years. A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym "Lila," provided The Verge with "both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia."

Review: Fedora 27 Workstation

On the whole there are several things to like about Fedora 27. The operating system was stable during my trial and I like that there are several session options, depending on whether we want to use Wayland or the X display server or even a more traditional-looking version of GNOME. I am happy to see Wayland is coming along to the point where it is close to on par with the X session. There are some corner cases to address, but GNOME on Wayland has improved a lot in the past year. I like the new LibreOffice feature which lets us sign and verify documents and I like GNOME's new settings panel. These are all small, but notable steps forward for GNOME, LibreOffice and Fedora. Most of the complaints I had this week had more to do with GNOME specifically than Fedora as an operating system. GNOME on Fedora is sluggish on my systems, both on the desktop computer and in VirtualBox, especially the Wayland session. This surprised me as when I ran GNOME's Wayland session on Ubuntu last month, the desktop performed quite a bit better. Ubuntu's GNOME on Wayland session was smooth and responsive, but Fedora's was too slow for me to use comfortably and I switched over to using the X session for most of my trial. Two other big differences I felt keenly between Ubuntu and Fedora were with regards to how these two leading projects set up GNOME. On Ubuntu we have a dock that acts as a task switcher, making it a suitable environment for multitasking. Fedora's GNOME has no equivalent. This means Fedora's GNOME is okay for running one or two programs at a time, but I tend to run eight or nine applications at any given moment. This becomes very awkward when using Fedora's default GNOME configuration as it is hard to switch between open windows quickly, at least without installing an extension. In a similar vein, Ubuntu's GNOME has window control buttons and Fedora's version does not, which again adds a few steps to what are usually very simple, quick actions. What it comes down to is I feel like Ubuntu takes GNOME and turns it into a full featured desktop environment, while Fedora provides us with just plain GNOME which feels more like a framework for a desktop we can then shape with extensions rather than a complete desktop environment. In fact, I think that describes Fedora's approach in general - the distribution feels more like a collection of open source utilities rather than an integrated whole. Earlier I mentioned LibreOffice can work with signed documents, but Fedora has no key manager, meaning we need to find and download one. Fedora ships with Totem, which is a fine video player, but it doesn't work with Wayland, making it an odd default choice. These little gaps or missed connections show up occasionally and it sets the distribution apart from other projects like openSUSE or Linux Mint where there is a stronger sense the pieces of the operating system working together with a unified vision. The big puzzle for me this week was with software updates. Linux effectively solved updating software and being able to keep running without a pause, reboot or lock-up decades ago. Other mainstream distributions have fast updates - some even have atomic, on-line updates. openSUSE has software snapshots through the file system, Ubuntu has live kernel updates that do away with rebooting entirely and NixOS has atomic, versioned updates via the package manager, to name just three examples. But Fedora has taken a big step backward in making updates require an immediate reboot, and taking an unusually long time to complete the update process, neither of which benefits the user. Fedora has some interesting features and I like that it showcases new technologies. It's a good place to see what new items are going to be landing in other projects next year. However, Fedora feels more and more like a testing ground for developers and less like a polished experience for people to use as their day-to-day operating system. Read more

6 Reasons Why Linux is Better than Windows For Servers

A server is a computer software or a machine that offers services to other programs or devices, referred to as “clients“. There are different types of servers: web servers, database servers, application servers, cloud computing servers, file servers, mail servers, DNS servers and much more. The usage share for Unix-like operating systems has over the years greatly improved, predominantly on servers, with Linux distributions at the forefront. Today a bigger percentage of servers on the Internet and data centers around the world are running a Linux-based operating system. Read more Also: All the supercomputers in the world moved to Linux operating systems

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