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Riddell Answers Canonical with Own IP Policy

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In the latest salvo in the Canonical IP controversy, Jonathan Riddell today posted his own IP Policy. Elsewhere, the GNOME Foundation today posted support of an updated User Data Manifesto and SUSE today revealed some SUSECon 2015 plans. Phoronix reported Monday that ext3 will be removed from the kernel and Red Hat announced the release of 7.2 Beta.

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Google, Microsoft Create Alliance for Open Media

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The founding members are Amazon, Cisco, Google, Intel Corporation, Microsoft, Mozilla and Netflix. The goal is to "create a new, open royalty-free video codec specification based on the contributions of members, along with binding specifications for media format, content encryption and adaptive streaming." The word open is used many times in the announcement, but only once with source. Is "open" the same thing as "open source?" Roy Schestowitz at Tuxmachines.org doesn't think so. He organized the news of the AOM under the title "OpenWashing (Fake FOSS)."

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Also: Comments on the Alliance for Open Media, or, "Oh Man, What a Day"

Mozilla's mobile misstep puts the Web at risk

Firefox Fading, Ditching OpenOffice, and Containers

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Dissatisfaction with Mozilla's recent announcement to change its extension core code is being expressed across the Internet. Folks aren't happy. Elsewhere, Chris Hoffman explains why you should switch from OpenOffice to LibreOffice and the Canonical IP fight continues. In other news, several container headlines caught my eye recently.

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More on Munich, Linux Coming Out

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Last week's news of Munich considering a switch back to Windows has been clarified or rebuked today. Reports from DebConf15 refute the claims from certain city councillors complaining about the Ubuntu-based Linux. Nick Heath and Robert Pogson weigh in. Jack M. Germain chimed in today on his look at the life and times of Linux saying, "In honor of Linux's two dozen years of giving, LinuxInsider brings some gifts of praise to the party." Elsewhere, Red Hat was included in Forbes' Most Innovative Companies roundup this year.

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Happy Birthday Linux, Thank you Linus

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The twenty-fourth birthday of the Linux kernel was the top story today. Linux' birthday is widely celebrated on August 25, the day of Linus' original post, while others mark the birthdate as October 5, the day of the first public release. Lots of sites paid homage with several running through the time-line of its life. Elsewhere, a couple articles sang Open Source praises today and DarkDuck seemed confused by Knoppix.

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The Open Source Greatness of Linux

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Ubuntu grabbed a large portion of the headlines today with Canonical's decision to abandon its paid software for desktops to concentrate on mobile devices. The Everyday Linux User reviewed Mageia 5 and Distrowatch.com has added "Release Model" to their database search options. Elsewhere, Danny Stieben said Linux is so great because it's Open Source and Munich is consdiering switching back to Linux on some machines because folks said there were no text editors, Skype support, or office suites installed. All this and more in today' Linux news round-up.

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Weird Names, New Filesystem, and Strange Distros

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The top story today seems to be the announcement from ex-Googlite Kent Overstreet of a new COW filesystem for Linux. In other news, Major Hayden explained why Ethernet devices have such weird names in Fedora and Manuel Jose covered the strangest Linux distributions. Elsewhere, Christine Hall posted her review of Bodhi 3.1.0 and Dedoimedo loved Mint 17.2. A review of LibreOffice 5 rounds out the day.

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Moksha, LibreOffice, and Antergos Woes

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Headlines pretty much returned to normal today as LinuxCon concluded last night, but a few stories still trickled in. Elsewhere, Christine Hall pondered the future of new Bodhi desktop Moksha and Jack Wallen discussed the LibreOffice 5.0 interface. And finally, adventures in Antergos dominated my day.

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The Latest from LinuxCon

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LinuxCon was the talk of the town this week with their announcements dominating the headlines. In other news, Ian Murdock blogged about how he came to Linux with a big thanks to Linus himself. Speaking of Linus, he made several headlines with his Q&A at LinuxCon this morning. Antergos got an update today, after my not having much luck with the last release last night. Dedoimedo said the Cinnamon desktop isn't "all sugar and spice" and Matthew Garrett didn't get a satisfying answer on intellectual property from Shuttleworth at LinuxCon.

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Debian & SFC Tout Copyright Aggregation Project as Debian turns 22

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The Debian Project and the Software Freedom Conservancy today announced the creation of the Debian Copyright Aggregation Project. The project protects contributors' code by enforcing the license as necessary. This announcement comes as contributors descend upon DebConf15 and Debianites worldwide celebrate Debian's twenty-second birthday. In other Linux news, Sabayon posted on their development this year and Gary Newell wondered if there is life for Enlightenment now they've been dumped by Bodhi.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming

Security News

  • Security advisories for Thursday
  • Please save GMane!
  • The End of Gmane?
    In 2002, I grew annoyed with not finding the obscure technical information I was looking for, so I started Gmane, the mailing list archive. All technical discussion took place on mailing lists those days, and archiving those were, at best, spotty and with horrible web interfaces. The past few weeks, the Gmane machines (and more importantly, the company I work for, who are graciously hosting the servers) have been the target of a number of distributed denial of service attacks. Our upstream have been good about helping us filter out the DDoS traffic, but it’s meant serious downtime where we’ve been completely off the Internet.
  • Pwnie Express makes IoT, Android security arsenal open source
    Pwnie Express has given the keys to software used to secure the Internet of Things (IoT) and Android software to the open-source community. The Internet of Things (IoT), the emergence of devices ranging from lighting to fridges and embedded systems which are connected to the web, has paved an avenue for cyberattackers to exploit.
  • The Software Supply Chain Is Bedeviled by Bad Open-Source Code [Ed: again, trace this back to FUD firms like Sonatype in this case]
    Open-source components play a key role in the software supply chain. By reducing the amount of code that development organizations need to write, open source enables companies to deliver software more efficiently — but not without significant risks, including defective and outdated components and security vulnerabilities.
  • Securing a Virtual World [Ed: paywall, undated (no year but reposted)]
  • Google tells Android's Linux kernel to toughen up and fight off those horrible hacker bullies
    In a blog post, Jeff Vander Stoep of the mobile operating system's security team said that in the next build of the OS, named Nougat, Google is going to be addressing two key areas of the Linux kernel that reside at the heart of most of the world's smartphones: memory protection and reducing areas available for attack by hackers.

today's howtos

Chew on this: Ubuntu Core Linux comes to the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 board

Linux and other open source software have been in the news quite a bit lately. As more and more people are seeing, closed source is not the only way to make money. A company like Red Hat, for instance, is able to be profitable while focusing its business on open source. Ubuntu is one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems, and it is not hard to see why. Not only is it easy to use and adaptable to much hardware (such as SoC boards), but there is a ton of free support online from the Ubuntu user community too. Today, Canonical announces a special Ubuntu Core image for the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 board. Read more