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Fedora 23 EOL, Bye to FBDEV, Installfests of Yore

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With Fedora 25 safely out of the door, time has come to bid adieu to version 23. Users are urged to upgrade. Elsewhere, Robin Miller looked back at an activity that older Linux users may remember, the Linux installfest. Michael Larabel reported today that the kernel may drop framebuffer device drivers and Dustin Kirkland shared Ubuntu's security overview.

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Also: neon User LTS, openSUSE Upgrades, Best Distro Poll

Korora 25 Unleashed, Best KDE Distro, Notorious B.U.G.

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Fedora-based Korora 25 was released Wednesday in 64-bit versions. Users are urged to upgrade. Elsewhere, Jack Wallen was seriously impressed by Fedora 25 and blogger DarkDuck said ROSA R8 is "near-perfect." Bruce Byfield discussed obstacles to Linux security just as a new kernel vulnerability comes to light. Dedoimedo declared the best KDE distro of 2016 and FOSSBYTES has 10 reasons to use Ubuntu.

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Longer Fedora Cycles, 2017 Predictions, New Bodhi Guide

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The top story today was Fedora developers' considering lengthening their developmental cycles and releasing only once a year. Matthew Miller said "PR is a legitimate input into planning." Bryan Lunduke is back with his prognostications for 2017 and Bruce Byfield has seven tips for using Plasma. DistroWatch Weekly reviewed Fedora 25 and Roger Carter penned an extensive user guide for Bodhi Linux 4.0.

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Mageia 5.1 Released, Tumbleweed's Latest, Most Secure

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The Mageia project today announced the release of stopgap version 5.1, an updated "respin" of 5.0 and all updates. The Daily Dot posted their picks for the most sure operating systems and the Hectic Geek is "quite pleased" with Fedora 25. Matthew Garrett chimed in on Ubuntu unofficial images and Dedoimedo reviewed Fedora-based Chapeau 24.

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DistroWatch Rankings and openSUSE Happiness, Devuan is Two

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Today in Linux news the Devuan project is two years old while the world waits for its inaugural release. Jesse Smith was happy with openSUSE 42.2 saying, "openSUSE succeeded in providing a stable, responsive environment." Elsewhere, KDE and NTP are fundraising and OMG!Ubuntu! looked at the difference 10 years can make in a distribution's ranking. Canonical said today that Mir isn't only for Unity and a newly funded sci-fi game looks promising indeed.

systemd-less Devuan may have turned two recently, but the project has yet to release 1.0. As Phoronix.com's Michael Larabel noted a beta was released in April but the project has been a bit quiet since. Larabel also said that systemd "hate" has calmed down this year, implying interest has probably waned in a systemd-free alternative. I think folks might still be interested in testing a release if and when a stable version is announced.

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Korora 25 Upgrades, Mageia 6 Delays, Gift Ideas

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The Korora project announced a bit of good news for user waiting for the latest release while Mageia users will have to continue to wait. opensource.com published a gift buying guide for Open Source fans and it looks like the netbook is back is back. Gary Newell reviewed Q4OS 1.8 and makeuseof.com today reminded us of why we use Linux.

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Kubuntu Cautiously Good, openSUSE 42.2 Upgrade Smooth

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Today in Linux news, the Fedora project discussed some upcoming features in version 25, headed up by GNOME 3.22. Dedoimedo test drove Kubuntu 16.10 and found Plasma to be its greatest shortcoming, mirroring what I thought of the latest openSUSE. Speaking of which, Neil Rickert blogged his thoughts on the openSUSE 42.2 experience and Jim Dean imparted a bit of information for Korora users.

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openSUSE 42.2 Leap Released, Fedora 25 a GO

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openSUSE 42.2 Leap was released Wednesday, November 16, as scheduled. "openSUSE Leap 42.2 is made to give stability-minded users and conservative technology adopters peace of mind." On the other side of town, Fedora 25 was declared "GOLD" and it's all "GO" for release Tuesday, November 22. Paul Brown gave an overview and history of SUSE at Linux.com and The Document Foundation posted videos online of their 2016 conference.

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Mint 18.1 Pushed to December, Linux Dominates Supercomputing

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Linux first appeared on the TOP500 supercomputer list in 1998, which was populated mostly by Unix. Today Linux runs 498 of those top 500 supercomputers, proving once again that Linux is dominating the world. Elsewhere, Clement Lefebvre said the Mint 18 update will probably be pushed into December due to continuing work on Cinnamon 3.2. Turns out there was a bit more intrigue behind the Munich Linux desktop dump and Jonathon Riddell has issued a user upgrade advisory for KDE neon users.

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openSUSE Leap Goes Gold, Fedora 25 Delayed a Week

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Today in Linux news openSUSE 42.2 Leap has gone Gold Master in time for next Wednesday's release. On the other side of town Fedora 25 has been delayed a week, pushing its release to November 22, 2016. Sam Varghese and John Grogan reported on the latest from SUSECon 2016, with one covering a Red Hat spy in attendance. Eric Hameleers released his latest liveslak and ISOs. The Hectic Geek compared Ubuntu 16.10 flavors and Carla Schroder examined Ubuntu's enterprise chops.

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More in Tux Machines

It Turns Out RISC-V Hardware So Far Isn't Entirely Open-Source

While they are trying to make it an open board, as it stands now Minnich just compares this RISC-V board as being no more open than an average ARM SoC and not as open as IBM POWER. Ron further commented that he is hoping for other RISC-V implementations from different vendors be more open. Read more

Perl 5.28.0 released

Version 5.28.0 of the Perl language has been released. "Perl 5.28.0 represents approximately 13 months of development since Perl 5.26.0 and contains approximately 730,000 lines of changes across 2,200 files from 77 authors". The full list of changes can be found over here; some highlights include Unicode 10.0 support, string- and number-specific bitwise operators, a change to more secure hash functions, and safer in-place editing. Read more

Today in Techrights

Will Microsoft’s Embrace Smother GitHub?

Microsoft has had an adversarial relationship with the open-source community. The company viewed the free Open Office software and the Linux operating system—which compete with Microsoft Office and Windows, respectively—as grave threats. In 2001 Windows chief Jim Allchin said: “Open source is an intellectual-property destroyer.” That same year CEO Steve Ballmer said “Linux is a cancer.” Microsoft attempted to use copyright law to crush open source in the courts. When these tactics failed, Microsoft decided if you can’t beat them, join them. It incorporated Linux and other open-source code into its servers in 2014. By 2016 Microsoft had more programmers contributing code to GitHub than any other company. The GitHub merger might reflect Microsoft’s “embrace, extend and extinguish” strategy for dominating its competitors. After all, GitHub hosts not only open-source software and Microsoft software but also the open-source projects of other companies, including Oracle, IBM, and Amazon Web Services. With GitHub, Microsoft could restrict a crucial platform for its rivals, mine data about competitors’ activities, target ads toward users, or restrict free services. Its control could lead to a sort of surveillance of innovative activity, giving it a unique, macro-scaled insight into software development. Read more