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rm -rf Whoops, Slackware 14.2 RC2, Shuttleworth Interview

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Mark Shuttleworth said in an interview published today that Linux would be difficult to use everyday if not for Ubuntu. Elsewhere, Patrick Volkerding announced Slackware 14.2 RC2 and one sysadmin had a real bad day after accidentally running rm -rf. Reiserfs creator and convicted murderer Hans Reiser is featured in a new motion picture that's getting mixed reviews and Neil Rickert shared his thoughts on btrfs.

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Kubuntu's Cautionary Tale, Requiem for Open Standards

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Andy Updegrove wrote yesterday, "The top IT companies are increasingly opting to use open source software to solve problems that they used to address with open standards." Elsewhere, Larry the BSD Guy said UbuntuBSD should consider what happened to Kubuntu when considering becoming an official Ubuntu flavor and Jesse Afolabi was "blown away" by Deepin OS 15. Jonathan Riddell announced a new rebasing of KDE Neon and Bruce Byfield looks at the Free Software Foundation's High Priority Projects.

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Red Hat Expansion Rumors and Easier Fedora Nightlies

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Red Hat is looking to expand their business into the Boston, Massachusetts and a version of the Red Hat logo may point where. Adam Williamson recently set up a directory where one can "easily find Fedora nightly images" and Benjamin Kerensa spoke with Vivaldi founder Jon von Tetzchner. In other news, Sasha Levin announced a new linux-stable security tree project and the Linux Foundation said the Internet is crumbling.

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New Malware Headlines, Fedora Stickers, New RMS Article

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A new Linux botnet named BillGates is making headlines today. The Russian-based Asian designed malware seems to be focusing on gaming sites. Elsewhere, Richard Stallman posted a new article today explaining the problem when free software requires non-free to function and Matt Hartley explained the difference between GNOME, Unity, and MATE. Then, for some fun, the new Plasma 5.7 wallpaper was revealed, a new Linux poll beckons, and Fedora announced a partnership with UnixStickers.com.

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LibreOffice 5.1.2, Ubuntu Numbers, OS is Dead

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The Document Foundation today announced the release of LibreOffice 5.1.2, the second update in the 5.1 Fresh branch. Nearly 90 bugs were squashed this cycle dealing heavily with rendering and placement issues. In other news, Red Hat touts a new client and Canonical is still trying to convince folks of their hundreds of millions of users. Matt Asay said today that the OS is dead thanks to the cloud and that "developers are becoming babies."

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New Vivaldi Browser, Red Hat Slapped, More Winbuntu

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One of the top stories today was the release of Vivaldi 1.0. Vivaldi is a new browser project founded by John von Tetzchner who co-founded Opera. In other news, Red Hat lost an important new client today but Jim Whitehurst is still confident of reaching $5 billion in revenue in five years. "PC-BSD 10.3 is looking great" and that Windows 10 update with Ubashu is now available.

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Dealing With Microsoft, KDE's New Vision, XScreenSaver Battle

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The fallout from last week's Canonical-Microsoft announcement continues to rain. First reactions ranged from enthusiastic to shocked and this week distrust is a common theme. Elsewhere, the KDE project presented its new and improved philosophy and is working on the mission statement. Apparently XScreenSaver is causing a bit of a kerfuffle in Debianland and Bruce Byfield ranked desktops from most customizable to "little more than launchers."

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Debian 7 & 8 Updated, New SUSE CTO, Different Distros

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The Debian project announced updates to "jessie" and "wheezy" last weekend bringing security and bug fixes only. In other news, SUSE announced a new executive position and the gentlemen who filled it. Elsewhere, Christine Hall discussed five distributions that "break the mold" and Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols reported on Linus Torvalds' talk at the 2016 Embedded Linux Conference.

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Fair Source, April Fools', Winbuntu review

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Today in Linux news, Matt Asay explained why Fair Source isn't Open Source and Blogger Locutus reviewed the new Winbuntu monster. Microsoft lured Oracle's Linux guy to Redmond and LinuxGizmos changed name and focus to Hackerboards.com. Of course, April 1 wouldn't be the same without some April Fools' jokes.

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Red Hat NSA, SUSE Phone, Fedora Looking Great

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Sam Varghese today again asked about Red Hat and its dealing with the NSA saying, "Red Hat is receiving a goodly sum to assist the NSA in activities that infringe on people's privacy." Red Hat today offered its enterprise operating system free of cost to developers and Phoronix.com said Fedora 24 is "looking great." Paul Thurrott posted screenshots of Ubuntu Bash on Windows 10 and Bryan Lunduke today asked, "Will openSUSE develop the SUSE Phone?"

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more