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Wayland Default Fedora 25, LibreOffice Emoji, Best Servers

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Red Hat's cutting-edge test bed is moving from Xorg/X11 to Wayland its next release. This is a big step even for a distribution known for adopting early technology. In other news, Akshay Deep has announced Emoji support for LibreOffice and Robin Muilwijk discusses the various Web server choices for Linux deployments.

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PowerShell for Linux, Mint 18 KDE, Fedora 25 Alpha NO-GO

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The top story today must be the open sourcing of Microsoft PowerShell and its availability for Linux. Alpha quality packages are downloadable on GitHub. In other news, Clement Lefebvre said Mint 18 KDE Beta should be available this weekend and Jan Kurik said Fedora 25 Alpha is a "NO-GO." Canonical is now a patron of KDE e.V. and the release of Plasma 5.8 has been bumped up to make openSUSE 42.2.

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ODF in the Wild, Netrunner Goes Maui, p0wnball Wizard

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Today in Linux news, the Linux Migrant noted two instances of ODF in use out in the real World. The Netrunner operating system has had a rocky existence with its changing bases and format, but apparently not enough. The project has changed again, this time renaming its desktop edition to Maui and currently deciding if the rolling system should continue. Elsewhere, Neil Rickert installed Tumbleweed without an Internet connection and shared all the details. The Register reported that Jersey Jack's The Hobbit pinball game runs on Ubuntu 15.10 and the Free Software Foundation Europe joined The Document Foundation Advisory Board.

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Debian is 23, Why use Geeko, Business Distros

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Today was Debian Day as fans all over the World celebrated the Linux project's birthday. Debian is 23 today, having been officially recognized as beginning August 16, 1993. Elsewhere, Bruce Byfield posted six Linux suggestions for businesses and Bertel King, Jr. listed six reasons to use openSUSE. Laura Abbott shared some tips for getting started with the Kernel project and My Linux Rig interviewed Andrew Conway, astronomer and Slackware user.

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OpenMandriva 3.0, Google Linux Snub, TCP Vulnerability

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OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 was announced Saturday with Linux 4.6.5, Plasma 5.6.5, and systemd 231. An early reviewer said he liked OpenMandriva but Plasma not as much. Elsewhere all anyone can seem to talk about is Google's decision to use something other than Linux to power its next embedded devices and a TCP vulnerability that could allow remote hijacking of Internet traffic. Patrick Volkerding has upgraded the toolchain in Slackware-current and Red Hat security expert said you can't trust any networks anywhere.

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Leap Alpha 3 Needs More Testing, Love at First Roll

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Douglas DeMaio today posted an update on Tumbleweed's progress and ended on a note of Leap. He's asking for more testers and bug reports. Elsewhere, Christine Hall said Manjaro Linux feels like "a well oiled sewing machine." The Document Foundation's Mike Saunders shared some LibreOffice 5.2 statistics and Red Hat's Atomic Host was updated to 7.2.6. Finally, Børge A. Roum tested a lot of Humble games and blogged his findings.

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More Fun with Windows 10, Yabba Dabba Do Bedrock Linux

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Windows 10 is back in the news and back up to their old tricks. The latest Windows 10 updates has been reported to delete Linux partitions without confirmation or even warning. Even pure Windows users have reported unbootable systems and Linux is the bad guy in a security question with Linux on Windows. Elsewhere, Lumina Desktop Environment hit milestone version 1.0.0 today and Linux Mint had an oopsy with their Firefox 48 update. New Bedrock Linux introduced a different approach to universal packaging and Christine Hall shared her top five favorite Linux distributions.

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Mint KDE Turns Green, ROSA R8 Out, Ubuntu 14.04.5

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Russian ROSA Company recently announced the release of ROSA Fresh R8 with your choice of four desktops. The final point release for Ubuntu 14.04 was announced and Clement Lefebvre said upcoming Mint 18 KDE will no longer sport its distinctive blue icon in favor of the green. In other Mint news, ArsTechnica's Scott Gilbertson said Linux doesn't get any better than Mint 18. Jamie Watson reviewed the difference between point and rolling Linux releases and two users share their personal Linux stories.

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Firefox 48, Mint 18 Xfce Released

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Clement Lefebvre today announced the release of Linux Mint 18 Xfce for users of that desktop environment. The other big story of the day was the release of Firefox 48 and its new multi-process operation. Elsewhere, Matt Hartley compared and contrasted Korora vs GeckoLinux and Mint MATE vs Ubuntu MATE. Also, Linux is becoming the more popular platform for botnet DDoS attacks.

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Also: Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Xfce Officially Released, Linux Mint 18 KDE Coming Soon

Debian Needs Artwork, Sysadmin Horrors, VA Linux

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July 29 was System Administration Appreciation Day and OpenSource.com celebrated with five sysadmin horror stories. Tecmint.com put together a list of t-shirts for system administrators and The Register had a round-up of fun things to do. Back in Linuxland, Bits from Debian put out the call for new artwork for upcoming version 9.0 and Ian Murdock was honored at this year's International Free Software Forum. And finally, VarGuy.com contributor Christopher Tozzi looked back at VA Linux today saying it was probably the most successful Open Source company.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: VPNFilter, Encryption in GNU/Linux, Intel CPU Bug Affecting rr Watchpoints

  • [Crackers] infect 500,000 consumer routers all over the world with malware

    VPNFilter—as the modular, multi-stage malware has been dubbed—works on consumer-grade routers made by Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear, TP-Link, and on network-attached storage devices from QNAP, Cisco researchers said in an advisory. It’s one of the few pieces of Internet-of-things malware that can survive a reboot. Infections in at least 54 countries have been slowly building since at least 2016, and Cisco researchers have been monitoring them for several months. The attacks drastically ramped up during the past three weeks, including two major assaults on devices located in Ukraine. The spike, combined with the advanced capabilities of the malware, prompted Cisco to release Wednesday’s report before the research is completed.

  • Do Not Use sha256crypt / sha512crypt - They're Dangerous

    I'd like to demonstrate why I think using sha256crypt or sha512crypt on current GNU/Linux operating systems is dangerous, and why I think the developers of GLIBC should move to scrypt or Argon2, or at least bcrypt or PBKDF2.

  • Intel CPU Bug Affecting rr Watchpoints
    I investigated an rr bug report and discovered an annoying Intel CPU bug that affects rr replay using data watchpoints. It doesn't seem to be hit very often in practice, which is good because I don't know any way to work around it. It turns out that the bug is probably covered by an existing Intel erratum for Skylake and Kaby Lake (and probably later generations, but I'm not sure), which I even blogged about previously! However, the erratum does not mention watchpoints and the bug I've found definitely depends on data watchpoints being set. I was able to write a stand-alone testcase to characterize the bug. The issue seems to be that if a rep stos (and probably rep movs) instruction writes between 1 and 64 bytes (inclusive), and you have a read or write watchpoint in the range [64, 128) bytes from the start of the writes (i.e., not triggered by the instruction), then one spurious retired conditional branch is (usually) counted. The alignment of the writes does not matter, and it's not related to speculative execution.

In Memoriam: Robin "Roblimo" Miller, a Videographer and Free Software Champion

Videographer Robin Roblimo Miller

Robin "Roblimo" Miller was a clever, friendly, and very amicable individual who everyone I know has plenty of positive things to say about. I had the pleasure of speaking to him for several hours about anything from personal life and professional views. Miller was a very knowledgeable person whose trade as a journalist and video producer I often envied. I have seen him facing his critics in his capacity as a journalist over a decade ago when he arranged a debate about OOXML (on live radio). Miller, to me, will always be remembered as a strong-minded and investigative journalist who "did the right thing" as the cliché goes, irrespective of financial gain -- something which can sometimes be detrimental to one's longterm health. Miller sacrificed many of his later years to a cause worth fighting for. This is what we ought to remember him for. Miller was - and always will be - a FOSS hero.

May everything you fought for be fulfilled, Mr. Miller. I already miss you.

Today in Techrights

Tux Machines Privacy Statement

Summary: Today, May 25th, the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into full effect; we hereby make a statement on privacy AS a matter of strict principle, this site never has and never will accumulate data on visitors (e.g. access logs) for longer than 28 days. The servers are configured to permanently delete all access data after this period of time. No 'offline' copies are being made. Temporary logging is only required in case of DDOS attacks and cracking attempts -- the sole purpose of such access. Additionally, we never have and never will sell any data pertaining to anything. We never received demands for such data from authorities; even if we had, we would openly declare this (publicly, a la Canary) and decline to comply. Privacy is extremely important to us, which is why pages contain little or no cross-site channels (such as Google Analytics, 'interactive' buttons for 'social' media etc.) and won't be adding any. Google may be able to 'see' what pages people visit because of Google Translate (top left of every page), but that is not much worse than one's ISP 'seeing' the same thing. We are aware of this caveat. Shall readers have any further questions on such matters, do not hesitate to contact us.